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Outpatient Care

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BUSINESS
May 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System's Chester County Hospital said on June 1 it will open a 72,000-square-foot outpatient center in West Grove in a facility built and owned by the for-profit development firm Anchor Health Properties. The center, which costs $28.4 million not including a surgery center that is expected to open this fall, was in the works before Penn's 2013 acquisition of Chester County Hospital, in West Chester. When it opens in June, the center called Penn Medicine Souther Chester County will offer radiology services, primary care, and ophthalmology.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Following the lead of other hospitals in Lower Bucks County, St. Mary Medical Center is planning a new outpatient care center. Hospital officials said the three-level addition would include an expansion of the hospital's emergency and trauma department, an outpatient surgery unit, and meeting rooms and staff offices to replace those currently in trailers on the hospital grounds. Both the cost of the expansion and the size of building "have yet to be determined," said Jan Haas, vice president of operations.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Following the lead of medical centers around the country, Lower Bucks Hospital is undergoing major renovations to meet the growing demands of outpatient care. "The balance now is definitely tipping toward outpatient care," said Len Karp, vice president of the Delaware Valley Hospital Council, an organization of 70 hospitals in the five-county area. "It's something that has been going on for a long time now. " Said Dennis Kain, chief executive officer of Lower Bucks Hospital: "This renovation has been the culmination of two years of planning in response to the needs of the community and the penetration of managed health care.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city will discontinue funding July 1 for outpatient care at two North Philadelphia hospitals that have been receiving special allotments for indigent patients. Representatives of both St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, 2600 N. Lawrence St., and Episcopal Hospital, Front Street and Lehigh Avenue, have appealed the decision, which was made by Health Department administrators. Last year, St. Christopher's received $172,000 and Episcopal Hospital was alloted $257,000. In a letter Thursday to Mayor Goode, Sarah Pye-Ross, Episcopal's community relations outreach coordinator, urged that funds be restored to "one of the most worthwhile health programs in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | by Bob Ritter, Daily News Staff Writer
Professional medical groups are making a last-minute budget appeal for $82.5 million more for medical care for the poor. The money is designed to help create a new funding pool to help doctors and hospitals handle the increased costs of outpatient care for people who cannot pay. If approved, the plan could attract new federal funds for Philadelphia hospitals, many of which treat large numbers of poor patients. Eight groups representing doctors, hospitals, eye doctors and dentists offered the plan at a Capitol news conference yesterday and asked the Legislature to consider the increase as part of ongoing budget talks.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the 1960s, Fort Dix's new Walson Army Community Hospital was teeming with activity. With Vietnam sending back its wounded and as many as 25,000 recruits suffering through basic training, there were times when its 500-plus beds were not enough. Today, yet another symptom of military downsizing, the hospital is merely a shell for a limited-service clinic. Its walls are crumbling and its patient wards are empty. The old delivery rooms, where once thousands of babies were born to the wives of young soldiers, now serve as office space.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will announce on Tuesday its biggest gift ever: $50 million toward the $425 million cost of an outpatient center rising on the institution's University City campus. The Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care, named for a family that owns a Fort Washington financial-services firm, will become the hub for complex outpatient care in the hospital's network in Southeastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The donation is part of a $100 million capital campaign to help pay for the facility, expected to open in 2015.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The union that represents casino workers in Atlantic City has for years been experimenting with ways to reduce health-care costs for its members while improving results. The latest effort is a primary-care center opened this year in Atlantic City by Unite Here Health, a national labor-management trust fund that provides health benefits to 20,000 Unite Here Local 54 members and dependents. The center, which had its grand opening Tuesday, has three physicians and a nurse-practitioner.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
While many area hospitals are on the critical list, Taylor Hospital in Ridley Park is getting a booster shot with the start of a $21.6 million expansion. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held Aug. 1 for the renovations, which include a new building for the emergency room and short-procedure unit, an additional medical office building and a parking lot. With declining admissions, the nursing shortage, soaring debts and government cutbacks hurting hospitals, it seems like a paradox for Taylor to begin a multimillion-dollar expansion project.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
As vice president and chief operating officer for Zurbrugg Memorial Hospitals, John Tegley is proud of the hospital system he helps to run, but he'll be the first to admit that it doesn't always run efficiently. Constructed in the early 1960s when more hospital beds were needed because hospital stays were longer, the Rancocas Valley division in Willingboro is a maze of corridors and small rooms. Tegley is responsible for the daily operation of the two hospitals in the system - one located in Riverside and the other in Willingboro.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System's Chester County Hospital said on June 1 it will open a 72,000-square-foot outpatient center in West Grove in a facility built and owned by the for-profit development firm Anchor Health Properties. The center, which costs $28.4 million not including a surgery center that is expected to open this fall, was in the works before Penn's 2013 acquisition of Chester County Hospital, in West Chester. When it opens in June, the center called Penn Medicine Souther Chester County will offer radiology services, primary care, and ophthalmology.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three percent of patients hospitalized in Pennsylvania in fiscal 2014 were "super-utilizers" - people admitted five or more times in a year, according to a new report from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council. Those 21,308 people accounted for 11 percent of total admissions and 14 percent of hospital days. The report estimated that super-utilizers were responsible for $545 million - 14 percent - of Medicare payments for inpatient stays and $216 million - 17 percent - of Medicaid payments in 2012.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The union that represents casino workers in Atlantic City has for years been experimenting with ways to reduce health-care costs for its members while improving results. The latest effort is a primary-care center opened this year in Atlantic City by Unite Here Health, a national labor-management trust fund that provides health benefits to 20,000 Unite Here Local 54 members and dependents. The center, which had its grand opening Tuesday, has three physicians and a nurse-practitioner.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Aria Health has proposed a "health-care village" for a 41-acre property in Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County. Aria's previous plan for the site in 2008 called for a hospital and medical-office complex, but that was stymied by community opposition. Aria officials presented the new concept Wednesday evening at a board of supervisors meeting, describing a potential development with medical offices, a physical rehabilitation facility, ambulatory care center, and clinical space.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will announce on Tuesday its biggest gift ever: $50 million toward the $425 million cost of an outpatient center rising on the institution's University City campus. The Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care, named for a family that owns a Fort Washington financial-services firm, will become the hub for complex outpatient care in the hospital's network in Southeastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The donation is part of a $100 million capital campaign to help pay for the facility, expected to open in 2015.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Revenue growth at area health systems was uneven in the fiscal year ended June 30, with the biggest systems showing strong gains while smaller competitors scraped out, at best, meager increases. Revenues from patients at Holy Redeemer Health System in Meadowbrook, for example, have been nearly flat since 2009. They were $336 million in the year ended June 30. That was $2 million more than in 2009 and $3.5 million less than in 2011. At Montgomery County neighbor Abington Health, patient revenues have been stuck at about $760 million for three years in a row, reflecting a widespread challenge that hospital executives attribute to changing medical-treatment methods and the weak economy.
NEWS
September 12, 2010
In response to the letter saying that outpatient commitment laws are "unworkable," the current outcomes of assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) show the opposite to be true ("Coerced treatment law unworkable," Tuesday). Statistics from the most current research on the most well-known AOT law, Kendra's Law, states a dramatic decrease in the number of people who are homeless, hospitalized, incarcerated, or victimized. In terms of funding, the most sensible, cost-effective treatment for individuals with severe mental illness who constantly end up in crisis situations is to provide sustained, continuous treatment in the community, not in a hospital or jail, which are the most costly.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2005 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Medicare plans to charge senior citizens 14 percent more for premiums next year and pay doctors about 4 percent less, agency officials said yesterday. The adjustments are meant to cope with unexpected increases in Medicare's spending on physician visits and outpatient care. Those outlays grew by 15 percent in 2004, not the 12 percent that had been projected, said Medicare chief actuary Richard S. Foster. "We expected significant growth and got more than that," Foster said.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2005 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the closing of Woman's Medical Hospital more than a week ago, doctors and community activists won a small victory yesterday in their fight to save the East Falls institution. A Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge ordered that the nonprofit group that owns the hospital buildings and its 12-acre campus keep the facility open for outpatients, including the unit that provides dialysis treatments to more than 100 people. The order forces WMCH Inc. - a nonprofit organization formed by state officials which acquired the land and buildings from Tenet Healthcare Inc. for $1 on Sept.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the 1960s, Fort Dix's new Walson Army Community Hospital was teeming with activity. With Vietnam sending back its wounded and as many as 25,000 recruits suffering through basic training, there were times when its 500-plus beds were not enough. Today, yet another symptom of military downsizing, the hospital is merely a shell for a limited-service clinic. Its walls are crumbling and its patient wards are empty. The old delivery rooms, where once thousands of babies were born to the wives of young soldiers, now serve as office space.
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