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Outreach

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NEWS
July 2, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Sonny Parker, once homeless and addicted, has spent much of the last three months convincing homeless and addicted people to give up their homes in the subway and enter the world of light. "Who better to reach them than those of us who've gone through it," Parker said yesterday. But Parker may not have a job tomorrow. The city's special outreach in the 13th and Market subway concourse, where as many as 200 people were encamped last winter, has effectively ended. The city has not renewed the outreach contract, which expired Wednesday.
LIVING
November 15, 1998 | By Mary Beth McCauley, FOR THE INQUIRER
At ground zero in the long fight against urban poverty, crime and despair stand the neighborhood houses of worship. Most offer care for the needy and for children as a simple religious mandate. In recent years, though, that mandate has been coupled with cold necessity. Historic government pullbacks have left congregations to shoulder more work - to operate a patchwork of programs with not only government encouragement but direct government funding. This new paradigm of so-called "faith-based initiatives" will be discussed and debated in a conference this week at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Marcellus Shale Coalition, the natural gas industry trade group, is expanding its presence in Southeastern Pennsylvania by hiring Shari Williams, a former communications specialist at the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the wife of State Sen. Anthony H. Williams (D., Philadelphia). Williams, who worked with the PUC for 17 years, led consumer education events on energy and utility issues in Eastern Pennsylvania. She will take on a new role with the shale coalition as outreach manager in the Philadelphia area, where the industry is stepping up efforts to address public apprehension with fracking, which takes place mostly in western and northern part of the state.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynne M. Abraham was sworn in yesterday as Philadelphia's 32d district attorney in the same City Hall courtroom where she had presided over criminal cases. Abraham, the city's first female district attorney, took the oath of office from Commonwealth Court Judge Alexander F. Barbieri. Abraham, a veteran judge with a reputation as a "tough cookie," immediately pledged to "aggressively and tenaciously prosecute all cases. " Abraham said Philadelphians have been coping with "enormous problems in fighting crime" and she promised that the District Attorney's Office "will do a lot of community outreach work.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The cocaine dealers shuffled their feet like prizefighters, cautiously eyeing the blue minivan as it pulled up to the corner of Ninth and Madison Streets on Tuesday morning. A prostitute checked her face in the mirror of a parked car. Pigeons gobbled crumbs left by a family keen on fattening the urban game for a future meal. But the van's occupants had not come seeking drugs or sex in a neighborhood where dilapidated rowhouses sprout like weeds among trash-strewn lots. Rather, they came to help.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Samuel Chambers goes to the doctor only when he has to. But every Tuesday, a hospital outreach site is open at King Terrace, a low-income senior housing center where Chambers works. Since it wasn't out of the way and was free, Chambers, 53, recently stopped in for a blood-pressure screening. Chambers is no different from most people, say health educators. That is why hospitals are opening more community outreach centers, said Anna Mae Greco-Galbraith, a community health educator at Phoenixville Hospital.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cruising down Jefferson Avenue, Gene White notices the young woman with the swollen belly. "There's one," he says, backing up to park near the corner grocery store she had just entered. White grabs his bag filled with pamphlets and fliers and stands patiently outside. When the woman emerges, he jumps into his delivery. Soon he has her home phone number and permission to visit later in the week. The scene is repeated throughout the day as White navigates through North Philadelphia, looking for bleary-eyed women with distended bellies, looking to score drugs; young pregnant girls with misguided impressions of motherhood; working women too overwhelmed to seek regular prenatal care; and the homeless ones with no means of taking care of themselves, much less a child.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 40 years ago, a tradition began in the Grove United Methodist Church in West Whiteland. As part of a community outreach effort, members of the congregation decided to invite people who lived at Devereux's nearby Kanner Center on Boot Road to come to Sunday services and a coffee hour before the service. Devereux is an organization that runs residential treatment centers and group homes for physically and mentally handicapped people in Chester County and the Main Line area.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly after becoming Drexel University's president in 2010, John A. Fry stood before the faculty and student body at convocation and declared civic engagement as one of his major goals. "My aspiration for Drexel University is for it to be the most civically engaged university in the United States, across all three dimensions of engagement: academic, student, and employee voluntarism, and institutionally supported neighborhood investment," Fry told the packed auditorium of about 900 people.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man on a grate near Fifth and Ranstead Streets was glad to see Phillip Beltz. "Hey! Can I get another pass for tonight?" asked the muscular young man in dingy jeans, who rubbed his naked hands together to keep them warm. "How did you like Food for Life?" asked Beltz, a social worker for Project HOME, referring to the North Philadelphia shelter where the man had spent the previous night. "Well, I had to sleep in a chair . . . and the heat went out," the man said. "But I'll go back.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2016
By Kevin C. Peterson While Donald Trump's support is seemingly surging among Republican and disaffected white voters, Hillary Clinton is gradually realizing she has a problem among the black electorate, particularly post-Civil Rights movement African Americans. That could spell disaster for Clinton in November, because to win she needs a robust turnout from black Americans in all generational demographics - from John Lewis' to John Legend's, from Marian Wright Edelman's to Mary Mary's.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The paper cutouts of smiling sunflower faces on Ed and Karen Cohen's kitchen table will soon be calling for a revolution. "Isn't that what we need?" Karen asked as South Jersey environmentalists gathered Sunday to paint, decorate, and otherwise prepare placards and other materials for the Clean Energy March in Philadelphia on Sunday. The Center City demonstration on the eve of the Democratic National Convention aims to bolster opposition to fracking and galvanize support for renewable energy.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Bereft of financial support from Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and other consumer giants avoiding this year's presidential conventions for fear that poisonous politics could taint their brands, the Democratic National Convention Committee is unveiling deals with tech firms it says will help reach voters later this month. On Monday, the Democrats said they will use Philadelphia-based Curalate to weed through social-media images and videos posted from the convention, and link them to cause-related websites for Democrats and favorite groups such as Planned Parenthood.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
On any given day, about 700 people are living unsheltered in the streets, train stations, or covered alcoves of Philadelphia. Most stake out space in four Center City locations where the city now wants to focus a new outreach program to connect people with services they need. The city's Office of Supportive Housing on Monday announced details of a new homeless outreach strategy targeting Rittenhouse Square and the areas around the Avenue of the Arts, the Convention Center, and Independence Hall during the morning and evening commutes and lunchtime.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The Benjamin Franklin Parkway has often served as the city's grandest stage, relegating its otherwise starring collection of cultural institutions to second billing. Unfortunately, they may not get even that much when Pope Francis becomes the Parkway's most prominent guest in a generation (with all due respect to Beyoncé): Authorities could require the museums to close as a security precaution. With a million or so people expected to gather in Philadelphia for the Catholic Church's World Meeting of Families in September, disruption will be inevitable and safety paramount.
NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tanya Baker and Hyacinth King expected to strike out with Little Miss Betty Wilson, a 64-year-old homeless woman bundled up and seated alone on a subway concourse floor near City Hall on Sunday. It was sunny and above freezing for the first time in days, but the mercury was about to nosedive again in a mercilessly cold winter that has broken records for cold, if not for snow. Outreach workers, Baker and King had a job to do on another Code Blue day in Philadelphia, the 47th so far. They could have forced Miss Betty to go to a hospital for the night.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the nine years that she has been accompanying her husband to Botswana, where he directs an ambitious health care program, Cindy Friedman has been unable to do much to help his efforts to reduce the incidence of HIV, train medical personnel, or treat tuberculosis. So Friedman developed her own outreach effort. A well-established fiber artist, she cultivated friendships with government officials, museum directors, and artists working in villages far from the capital, Gaborone. Through those relationships, she has helped foster artist communities and help talented men and women who had little or no training find creative outlets.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy King Keleher, 76, of Cherry Hill, community outreach director at Virtua Voorhees Hospital and then at Cooper University Health Care, died of cancer on Wednesday, Dec. 31, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. "She was an incredibly kind and thoughtful person," said Perry Weinstock, chief of cardiology at Cooper University Hospital. When he moved to Cooper from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in 1998, he said, "one of the first people I met was Nancy. " Besides her administrative work at Cooper, Weinstock said, "she was doing a lot of volunteer work for the Heart Association.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dawn Wells is the mother of two young boys, one of whom will turn 3 in February. It is the same age Scott McMillan was when, police say, he was beaten to death nearly three weeks ago by his mother and her boyfriend in their home in Chester County. At her home in Nova Scotia, Canada, Wells heard about the case through social media. "It doesn't matter what part of the world you're from, everyone's affected by this," she said. "It just broke my heart. " She wanted to do something for McMillan and his 6-year-old brother, who police say also was abused.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a goal of expanding Jewish enrollment, Drexel University will build a Center for Jewish Life on its West Philadelphia campus. The project will be funded by a $6 million pledge from philanthropist Raymond G. Perelman. "Our goal at Drexel is to make the university a greater school of choice for Jewish students from our region and across the nation," Drexel President John A. Fry said in a statement. The center, scheduled to open in fall 2016, will be named for Perelman.
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