CollectionsOutsider Art
IN THE NEWS

Outsider Art

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2012 | BY ROBERTA FALLON, For the Daily News
THE WHITNEY Biennial in New York claims to take the pulse of the country's art scene every two years, but the mother of all American art exhibits rarely digs deeper than New York or Los Angeles. For the radical "People's Biennial" now at Haverford College, curators looked elsewhere. The exhibit eschews work from major art centers in favor of five regional outposts (including Philadelphia) chosen through a jury process open to all. Organized by artist Harrell Fletcher of Portland, Ore., and curator Jens Hoffmann of San Francisco, People's Biennial originated when the two brought their idea for a nontraditional biennial to Independent Curators International (ICI)
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
On April 15, Sheldon and Jill Bonovitz will celebrate 46 years of marriage. Who knows where they might be or what they might be doing, but chances are, if past is prologue, it will involve art. Jill Bonovitz is a ceramic artist and a founder of the Clay Studio in Philadelphia. Sheldon Bonovitz is better known for his legal artistry, although he says he has "an artistic side. " "I have," he says, "a very strong sense of what works and what doesn't work. " What works is art. The two share a passion, and for the most part a sensibility, that has found mutual expression in a decades-long collecting collaboration.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Choices abound this weekend. The problem is, they are all happening in the next 24 hours! TONIGHT: Outsider art prevails at the First Unitarian Church with the primitive romantic stylings of man-child Daniel Johnston, Brother Danielson, of oddball Christian family troupe the Danielson Family, and Azita, the former frontwoman of the no-wave Scissor Girls (7:30 p.m., 2125 Chestnut St., 215-925-6356, $10, all ages, www.r5productions.com) . . . Tom Carter of Texas psych-folk band Charalambides stops in at the Philadelphia Record Exchange for a free performance (7 p.m., 618 S. 5th St., 215-925-7892, www.wholly other.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
The Museum of American Folk Art Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century American Folk Art and Artists, by Chuck and Jan Rosenak, has got people saying they don't know what folk art is anymore. "Is it handmade weathervanes, professional traveling artists, young women's handiwork, mass-produced decoys, a slave quilt, or is it the expression of self-taught artists, urban and rural, who respond to the world as they see it?" asks Robert Bishop, director of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York, who wrote the preface to the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | Mike Schaffer
Film Beasts of the Southern Wild (ssss out of four stars) Benh Zeitlin's intensely strange and wonderful film, about a girl named Hushpuppy, her defiant but deathly ill father, and the ragged Louisiana delta community they inhabit, is dreamlike and full of grand emotional swells. Moviemaking as outsider art. PG-13 (intense imagery, violence, adult themes). — Steven Rea Music Big-voiced Nona Hendryx releases her new album next week, Mutatis Mutandis (Latin for "by changing those things that need to be changed," sort of like saying, "Now that we've changed what needs changing")
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
"Outsider art" is naive in that it's produced by untutored artists, but the best of it, like the assembled sculptures of Julio Miraglia or the small bronzes of Louis Monza, also displays an intuitive grasp of formal aesthetics that one doesn't usually find in pure folk art. It can be very intense, even impassioned work, like the remarkable fist- sized assemblages by the anonymous black artist known as Philadelphia Wireman. These works demonstrate that outsider artists can be just as obsessive about art-making and just as aware of what they are doing as professionally trained ones.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
You'd recognize the faces: mob boss Tony Soprano, chemistry teacher-turned-meth-chef Walter White, and everyone's favorite dad, Homer Simpson. You may not recognize the name of the artist, Peter Somenshein, 28, of Narberth. But with his forthcoming solo show at the Oasis Art Center, that, too, may change. "It's been really cool working with Peter," says Maggie Mills, one of the artists who instruct aspiring talents at Oasis in North Philadelphia. "He's made amazing progress in the time he's been here.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The drawings of Adolf Wolfli are as fascinating as the story of his bizarre life. After seeing them, one can be easily seduced into embracing Wolfli as a native genius whose art has been suppressed by a narrow-minded critical establishment. Wolfli, who died in 1930, was a schizophrenic who created a vast oeuvre of thousands of pencil drawings while confined for 35 years to a cell in a Swiss mental asylum. He was the ultimate "outsider" artist - that is, one who worked in ignorance of European art-historical traditions.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In the world according to Irwin Chusid, the Shaggs, the New Hampshire sisters whose 1969 album Philosophy of the World is revered by cultists for its naive incompetence, are "unwitting godmothers of Outsider music. " Daniel Johnston, the lisping Texan with a history of mental illness and an undeniable gift for songwriting, is another Outsider touchstone. With tunes now featured in a Target commercial and on the just-issued CD Rejected Unknown, Johnston has mustered a modest tour that stops at the North Star Bar tonight.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - To honor the 80th birthday of celebrated South African playwright Athol Fugard, The Road to Mecca , a play he wrote in the mid-'80s, opened Tuesday night for the first time on Broadway. We have many reasons to celebrate Fugard - foremost, his creation of exceptional theater in his unswerving march against the official racism of South African apartheid - but The Road to Mecca is not among them. It's a ho-hum play with a dull first act, as tedious as cleaning up the piles on your desk, and with a second act that fails to deliver even the satisfaction of at least a clean desktop.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
You'd recognize the faces: mob boss Tony Soprano, chemistry teacher-turned-meth-chef Walter White, and everyone's favorite dad, Homer Simpson. You may not recognize the name of the artist, Peter Somenshein, 28, of Narberth. But with his forthcoming solo show at the Oasis Art Center, that, too, may change. "It's been really cool working with Peter," says Maggie Mills, one of the artists who instruct aspiring talents at Oasis in North Philadelphia. "He's made amazing progress in the time he's been here.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
Movies The Call See Steven Rea's preview on H2. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone See Steven Rea's preview on H2. Like Someone in Love A young Japanese prostitute develops an unusual relationship with a client who doesn't really want sex. Japanese with subtitles. Lore See Steven Rea's preview on H2. No True story of a young Chilean advertising executive who spearheads a campaign to defeat dictator Augusto Pinochet during an electoral referendum. Spanish with subtitles.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
For the most part, the artists of " 'Great and Mighty Things': Outsider Art From the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Collection," which goes on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Sunday, shouldn't be called "outsiders. " They may be free of associations with academic art and the so-called art mainstream, however one chooses to define that elastic term. But "outsider" is a tag invented by insiders, both to separate these artists from the elite (while making them marketable) and also to camouflage or excuse technical deficiencies in their work, particularly wonky drawing.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
On April 15, Sheldon and Jill Bonovitz will celebrate 46 years of marriage. Who knows where they might be or what they might be doing, but chances are, if past is prologue, it will involve art. Jill Bonovitz is a ceramic artist and a founder of the Clay Studio in Philadelphia. Sheldon Bonovitz is better known for his legal artistry, although he says he has "an artistic side. " "I have," he says, "a very strong sense of what works and what doesn't work. " What works is art. The two share a passion, and for the most part a sensibility, that has found mutual expression in a decades-long collecting collaboration.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | Mike Schaffer
Film Beasts of the Southern Wild (ssss out of four stars) Benh Zeitlin's intensely strange and wonderful film, about a girl named Hushpuppy, her defiant but deathly ill father, and the ragged Louisiana delta community they inhabit, is dreamlike and full of grand emotional swells. Moviemaking as outsider art. PG-13 (intense imagery, violence, adult themes). — Steven Rea Music Big-voiced Nona Hendryx releases her new album next week, Mutatis Mutandis (Latin for "by changing those things that need to be changed," sort of like saying, "Now that we've changed what needs changing")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2012 | BY ROBERTA FALLON, For the Daily News
THE WHITNEY Biennial in New York claims to take the pulse of the country's art scene every two years, but the mother of all American art exhibits rarely digs deeper than New York or Los Angeles. For the radical "People's Biennial" now at Haverford College, curators looked elsewhere. The exhibit eschews work from major art centers in favor of five regional outposts (including Philadelphia) chosen through a jury process open to all. Organized by artist Harrell Fletcher of Portland, Ore., and curator Jens Hoffmann of San Francisco, People's Biennial originated when the two brought their idea for a nontraditional biennial to Independent Curators International (ICI)
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - To honor the 80th birthday of celebrated South African playwright Athol Fugard, The Road to Mecca , a play he wrote in the mid-'80s, opened Tuesday night for the first time on Broadway. We have many reasons to celebrate Fugard - foremost, his creation of exceptional theater in his unswerving march against the official racism of South African apartheid - but The Road to Mecca is not among them. It's a ho-hum play with a dull first act, as tedious as cleaning up the piles on your desk, and with a second act that fails to deliver even the satisfaction of at least a clean desktop.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Chances are no mourners will gather at the foot of the South Street Bridge tomorrow when the wrecking ball arrives. The decrepit 85-year-old span will close to traffic, and demolition will begin almost immediately, according to the city. A new bridge is to open two years, and $67.5 million, from now. Aside from some modestly ornamental ironwork, the bridge has led a utilitarian existence, and the idea of replacing it with something of greater structural integrity strikes commuters between West Philadelphia and Center City as a sensible move.
NEWS
May 2, 2004 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As traffic droned and thudded overhead, about 200 people milled underneath Interstate 95 in South Philadelphia yesterday, snapping pictures, pushing baby strollers, tugging dogs on leashes - and taking in art. This is the third year that local photographer Zoe Strauss, 34, has mounted a temporary exhibit of her stark and often startling images of everyday life in an environment designed to make her work accessible to more than just the gallery crowd....
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|