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Ovarian Cancer

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NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adding to conflicting research on the risks and benefits of postmenopausal estrogen therapy, a large new study concludes that taking the hormone for at least 10 years significantly raises the risk of dying from ovarian cancer. But even with this study, the link is not proven and questions remain. The study was begun so long ago that it focused on women who took estrogen alone, even though women today usually take estrogen with progestin - a regimen that may reduce any ovarian-cancer risk.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Birth-control pills appear to reduce a woman's risk of ovarian cancer by at least 40 percent, regardless of the brand, even if she has been taking them less than a year or stopped taking them 15 years ago, researchers say. They say a goverment study involving more than 4,000 women provided the strongest evidence yet of the protective value of oral contraceptives against the deadly form of cancer. "This is very strong confirmation of something that had been suspected for quite some time," said Nancy C. Lee, a researcher from the federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta who reported the findings in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the discovery more than 30 years ago of a protein shed by tumor cells in the ovaries, researchers have tried unsuccessfully to use it for an ovarian-cancer screening test. Now, a mammoth, long-awaited United Kingdom study has had some success by tracking rapid changes in blood levels of the protein, CA125, rather than simply elevations above a presumed normal. A key to this screening strategy is an ovarian-cancer risk formula, or algorithm, developed over many years by a Harvard biostatistician with help from oncologists, including ones at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 9, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When the diagnosis of ovarian cancer came, New Jersey Community Affairs Commissioner Susan Bass Levin met the news with shock and a degree of relief. "I thought it couldn't happen to me," she said yesterday. "Nobody in my family had cancer. " After months of dealing with the cancer privately, the former Cherry Hill mayor went public in hopes of encouraging other women to get annual exams to detect cancer early - before it's too late to help them. Levin said she was grateful that her cancer had been detected in the early stages and was treatable.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Hugh G. Grady, 78, of Jenkintown, an expert on ovarian cancer and a distinguished medical educator, died Saturday at the St. Joseph's Villa nursing home in Flourtown. A native of Philadelphia, Dr. Grady was the salutatorian of the Class of 1926 of St. Joseph Prep as well as of the Class of 1930 at St. Joseph College. He received his medical degree from the Thomas Jefferson University School of Medicine in 1934. Dr. Grady completed his internship and residency at the old Philadelphia General Hospital.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most women with ovarian cancer get inadequate treatment that cuts their survival short. Experts keep lamenting this well-known problem. This spring, for example, a major report by the Institute of Medicine said that although women who receive care according to national guidelines have "improved survival, less than one-half of women with ovarian cancer receive such care. " What the report didn't say is that, since 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved two sophisticated blood tests that can help women get the optimal surgery for ovarian cancer.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women at high risk for ovarian cancer should get an annual blood test that could detect the disease in its earliest stage when it can be effectively treated, researchers told the American Association for Cancer Research meeting here yesterday. The test, which detects a protein found at elevated levels in the bloodstream of women with ovarian cancer, might someday be used much like a mammogram to screen healthy women over age 50, a cancer expert, Dr. Robert C. Bast Jr., said. If preliminary findings from a trial in England hold up in a larger study being planned, annual routine administration of the antibody test could save the lives of 4,500 to 5,000 American women every year, Bast said.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania researchers believe they are making headway in boosting the immune system to fight a formidable foe - late-stage ovarian cancer. On Saturday, the scientists presented results from the first 31 patients to receive experimental immune therapies made from their own cells, plus anticancer drugs. Distinguishing the effects of the novel therapies from conventional drugs is tricky, especially since two women who have remained cancer-free were in remission when they joined the study.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald and Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Most women with highly curable, early-stage ovarian cancer are not meticulously checked during surgery to see if the disease has spread - a lapse that could increase their chances of dying, according to a new National Cancer Institute study. The study also found that women frequently are not given the state-of-the-art chemotherapy treatments recommended for ovarian cancer, especially if they are 65 or older and have advanced disease. The findings are an indication that even as researchers develop new and more effective treatments for various cancers, many people do not get the standard of care already available.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
She felt that in some eerie way, her own life was being shown on TV. For months, Laura Rosenthal had been identifying with the show thirtysomething. Her husband, Jesse, was trying hard to make a go of his own business, just as character Michael Steadman was; the Rosenthals were raising two children, just as characters Nancy and Elliot Weston were. Like many young couples who are thirtysomething junkies, the Rosenthals enjoyed comparing the twists and turns of their own marriage with the ones on the show.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most women with ovarian cancer get inadequate treatment that cuts their survival short. Experts keep lamenting this well-known problem. This spring, for example, a major report by the Institute of Medicine said that although women who receive care according to national guidelines have "improved survival, less than one-half of women with ovarian cancer receive such care. " What the report didn't say is that, since 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved two sophisticated blood tests that can help women get the optimal surgery for ovarian cancer.
NEWS
February 28, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, COLUMNIST
Thank God. Help is here. I know, you've been worried. You thought the world was going to hell in a handbasket. You thought nobody cared about the serious problems we face, women in particular. But you needn't have worried. Because now there is a neck and chest cream. Thank God, right? I saw the commercial on TV a few minutes ago, and I was like, they are talking to me. Specifically, my dry neck. Which the ad called "crepey. " Like Death. You would think we'd met!
BUSINESS
February 11, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Adaptimmune Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company with U.S. operations in Philadelphia, said Tuesday that the Food and Drug Administration has granted "breakthrough therapy designation" for its TCR engineered T-cell therapy to treat cancer. The company said the designation, intended to expedite the development and review of drugs for serious or life-threatening conditions, is based on results of a Phase 1/2 trial in patients with metastatic or recurrent synovial sarcoma who received prior chemotherapy.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Vivien Parnell McCarthy, 69, a legal secretary who ran a psychic entertainment business from her home in Mount Airy, died Wednesday, Dec. 30, of ovarian cancer at home. Although she worked as a paralegal and secretary, Mrs. McCarthy was best known as Vivienne McCarthy, psychic, fortune teller, palmist, numerologist, and astrologist. Mrs. McCarthy used everything from playing cards to kangaroo bones, tea leaves to candle flames, and sand to stones in predicting the future, she told Philadelphia Daily News reporter Joe Clark.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny and Matt Stuetz have two things on their mind at all times: her cancer and their children. The Willow Grove couple were devastated when Jenny, 43, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. But their focus since then has been on keeping her healthy while also keeping the lives of their children - son Jackson, now 8, and daughter Madison, now 7 - as normal as possible. So for at least one week this summer, the children were able to shed some of their worries at Camp KIDS, a program of Gilda's Club in Warminster.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been a long journey to the priesthood for the Rev. James J. Grogan. He comes from a family that has produced about 15 priests in Ireland and the United States over the last century. But becoming a priest seemed unlikely for Grogan until fate and a call from God changed his direction. He was married and has three adult sons. A permanent deacon for nine years, he was ordained last month as a priest along with four others by Trenton Diocese Bishop David M. O'Connell. Grogan, 58, officially assumed his duties on July 1 at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church in Moorestown, the parish that has been his family's spiritual home for three decades and where his children attended parochial school.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before M. Allan Vogelson became a judge in 1995, he sometimes dined in Atlantic City in the early 1980s with Pete Rose, who was the Phillies' first baseman from 1979 to 1983. They shared the table with Carol Woliung, who in 1984 would become Rose's second wife. They were dining at the Playboy Hotel & Casino because Woliung was a Bunny waitress there. And because Vogelson's wife, Sandra, was, as she wrote in her resumé, " 'Bunny Mother,' the executive in charge of over 400 Playboy cocktail and dealer Bunnies.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the discovery more than 30 years ago of a protein shed by tumor cells in the ovaries, researchers have tried unsuccessfully to use it for an ovarian-cancer screening test. Now, a mammoth, long-awaited United Kingdom study has had some success by tracking rapid changes in blood levels of the protein, CA125, rather than simply elevations above a presumed normal. A key to this screening strategy is an ovarian-cancer risk formula, or algorithm, developed over many years by a Harvard biostatistician with help from oncologists, including ones at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1962, President John F. Kennedy committed the nation to landing a man on the moon by decade's end. In July 1969, it was mission accomplished. A half-century later, invoking Kennedy's challenge, scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced they, too, were shooting for the moon. They launched the Cancer Moonshots Program, with the aim of reducing cancer deaths within five to 10 years. "It's a very goal-oriented effort that seems to impact one thing - and that is cancer mortality," Dr. Ronald DePinho, president of MD Anderson, said Saturday at the annual meeting convened by the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her jaw was broken. Fractures lined her skull. Burns covered her thighs. Two weeks shy of her first birthday, the girl had just arrived at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Social workers immediately placed the infant in foster care. But arresting the alleged abuser - her mother - took eight months. At first, Ashley Reichard, 26, of Bristol Township, blamed the girl's father, police said. And then she allegedly pretended to have ovarian cancer, shaving her head and eyebrows and forging medical forms as a Bucks County grand jury investigated.
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