CollectionsOven
IN THE NEWS

Oven

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
May 1, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I would appreciate knowing what is considered to be a simmering temperature in an oven? I prefer to cook soups in ovens rather than on top of the stove because they don't burn as easily on the bottom. - C.S. I have excellent results cooking pot roasts in the oven at 225 to 250 degrees. The result is a very tender, flavorful pot roast. Soups and meat stocks can be cooked at the same temperature. Of course, since ovens vary greatly in their temperature accuracy, monitor the pot to find the optimum oven setting in your own oven.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Pamela Haines
The oven wouldn't work, but it was a good stove, not something to be cast away lightly. I called a friend who knows about these things and he gave me the name of an appliance repair man. Tom was friendly on the phone. I was hopeful he might bring us good news but braced for the worst. He was even more friendly in person. He had grown up in our neighborhood before moving out to the suburbs. He remembered dances at the Catholic school across the street. He talked as he checked out the oven: "Well, it's an old one, but the problem is really simple.
FOOD
February 11, 1987 | By NORMA SCHONWETTER, Special to the Daily News
Whether you are new to microwaving or a long time owner, everyone appreciates microwave shortcuts and tips for success. To quick thaw frozen whipped topping, microwave a 4 1/2-ounce carton on Medium Low (30 percent) for 1 minute. For a browner looking pie crust, brush with dark corn syrup, maple syrup or vanilla for sweet fillings. Brush with Worcestershire or soy sauce for savory fillings. Microwave a two crusted fruit pie for 10 minutes on High, then place in preheated 450 degree oven for 10 minutes or until browned and juices are bubbling through slit.
NEWS
August 9, 2009 | By Beth Williams FOR THE INQUIRER
It is my research partner's birthday, and I want to bake her a cake. Here in this small town in the Peruvian Andes, I am unsure how to begin - I have no electric oven to bake in, and certainly no Internet with which to search for a cake recipe. A growing international health nonprofit sent my partner and me to San Jose de Secce on a reconnaissance mission. We eat and sleep at the Medina family's hospedaje, where women huddle around the wood-burning stove with Se?ora Medina, gossiping and chewing coca leaves while the household band of cuy, or guinea pigs, run rampant at their feet.
FOOD
August 22, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: My cookies always burn on the bottom before the tops are quite done. Is there any way I can prevent this? - Terri Dear Terri: Your oven may be too hot. Many home ovens have inaccurate thermostats, so you may be cooking at temperatures higher or lower than what you think you've set them at. An inexpensive oven thermometer, available in most cookware gadget departments, can give you the correct oven temperature, and you can then adjust...
FOOD
November 12, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: How can I remove a stale odor from the inside of my microwave oven? - Betty Dear Betty: If you think the oven needs cleaning, wash it out thoroughly with a little baking soda dissolved in hot water. Then, if the odor persists, place a cup of water, with several tablespoons lemon juice added, into the oven. Bring the water to a boil and let it boil for a few minutes. This should freshen up the oven nicely. I'm sending you a copy of my newsletter, "Eliminating Household Odors," which includes other tips for freshening up your household furnishings and appliances, as well as formulas for homemade air fresheners and methods for destroying obnoxious odors such as tobacco smoke, musty mildew, paint and cooking odors.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years ago last month, Mark T. Collins, 23 and living alone in a house in the Feltonville section of the city, told his family in a note that he was "going away" and that they would never see him again, police said. Yesterday, police and family members identified his decomposed body, found Monday night in an old bread-baking oven in the basement of the now-vacant house, in the 300 block of East Rockland Street. He apparently had climbed into the large brick oven and shot himself in the head with a 12-gauge shotgun shortly after writing the note, police said.
FOOD
December 31, 1986 | By NORMA SCHONWETTER, Special to the Daily News
Microwave manufacturers have designed two new compact microwave ovens that are incredibly versatile. They microwave, toast, bake, broil and microbake using thermal heat. Basically, they are under-the-cabinet units that can replace a toaster oven, thereby reducing some of the clutter in small kitchens. Appealing to apartment dwellers and condo owners, they offer the consumer a combination microwave that is compact and more reasonably priced than the larger units previously available.
FOOD
November 2, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Most people who have tasted sun-dried tomatoes concede that they are delicious and lend themselves to many wonderful uses. And all agree that they're expensive, ranging from about $16 to more than $25 a pound. Plus, an 8 1/2-ounce jar of sun-dried tomatoes just doesn't last very long. If you decide to beat the cost and make them yourself, most recipes are time-consuming, requiring a week of drying and turning. They're also barely feasible for urban dwellers or people who live where the sunlight isn't especially strong and the air isn't especially dry. The fact is you can make a good version of sun-dried tomatoes, which is actually a food of the less affluent people of Sicily.
FOOD
March 22, 1989 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. I read an article on how to dry fruit. The process involved constructing wooden frames, using cheesecloth and drying the fruit outside for two to three weeks. I need something faster. Can fruit be dried in the oven? - Jen Haeseler Auburn, Pa. A. "Stocking Up" by Rodale Press gives the following information on how to dry fruit in the oven: The fruit to be dried should be perfect - unblemished, unbruised and fully ripe. One oven can take about six pounds of fruit. Fruit should be exposed top and bottom.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 5, 2016
Makes 8 servings 1/2 cup olive oil, plus more as needed 4 cloves of garlic, crushed 2 shallots, finely diced (can be replaced by small onion) 10-12 medium tomatoes, cut in quarters 5-6 sprigs of fresh thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt, or any salt 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place oil, garlic, and diced shallots in a medium baking dish; put in the oven for 7-10 minutes. 2. Remove pan from the oven and add tomatoes, thyme, and oregano.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Staff Writer
HOW DO YOU change behavior? How do you persuade kids to see the benefits of curried chicken with cauliflower over Cheetos and KFC? My Daughter's Kitchen cooking classes teach kids to cook healthy dinners, providing a primer on the basics of chopping and sautéing while exposing them to new fresh foods along the way. This spring, volunteers in 31 classes around the region have had a good measure of success: In my class at Prince Hall Elementary in...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
One Halloween, they dressed as Taylor Swift and Kanye West. Another year, they went as Katy Perry and Elmo. And for their friend's annual costume bash in 2012, she was Miss Piggy and he was Kermit. That night, in front of 30 people and their miniature poodle, Lexi, with Adele's cover of "Make You Feel My Love" playing and a friend videotaping every moment, Marcus proposed and Allison said yes. "I shook like a leaf the rest of the night," she recalls. They'd known each other since ninth grade at Philadelphia's High School for the Creative and Performing Arts.
FOOD
March 11, 2016
Makes 6 Servings 2 bananas, peeled and sliced into coins 2 tablespoons butter (cut in half, to be used in 1 tablespoon measurements) 4 large eggs 1/2 cup flour 1 cup whole milk 1/2 cup old-fashioned oatmeal (not quick cooking) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon brown sugar 8 ounces Greek vanilla yogurt, for serving 1. Preheat oven to 425 F. 2. Peel banana and slice into coins. 3. Melt one tablespoon of butter in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat.
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Makes 6 servings 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 large rutabaga, peeled and cut into 3/8 inch dice (7 cups) 1/3 cup thyme leaves 1 cup finely grated parmesan 2 cloves garlic, crushed Scant 5 tablespoons capers, coarsely chopped 3 small yellow bell peppers 3 small red bell peppers 2 teaspoons olive oil 6-ounce chevre log, broken into 3/8 inch pieces 1/3 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, coarsely chopped ...
FOOD
January 7, 2016
Makes 4 slices 1 cup chickpea flour 1 cup water 11/2 tablespoon olive oil, plus more to grease skillet 1/2 teaspoon salt Optional: 1/4 teaspoon dried herbs, such as oregano 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. 2. Lightly grease a 10-inch cast iron skillet. 3. Place in the oven for 5 minutes until hot. 4. Pour socca batter into the pan. Bake 8-10 minutes, until socca nears golden brown and middle is firm. Remove from oven and set aside. Per slice: 227 calories 8 grams fat, no cholesterol, 30 grams carbohydrates, 10 grams protein, 300 milligrams sodium, 9 grams fiber.
FOOD
December 18, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
The students from Wiggins Prep Elementary in Camden were wound up for their last day of cooking class: They'd be preparing dinner for parents, siblings, and guests, showing off the skills they'd learned over the last seven weeks. And their excitement was bubbling over. The teachers were having issues of their own. "I just want to let you know what we are working with today," said Edith Bobb, one of the three teachers who have helped with the class. Dawn Wilson had put on two different-colored socks that morning, and Susan Lore came to school wearing two different shoes.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MAUREEN FITZGERALD, Inquirer Food Editor mfitzgerald@phillynews.com, 215-854-5744
NOT SO LONG AGO, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna-noodle; chicken and rice; ground beef and macaroni; these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia. "I guess people don't make them anymore.
FOOD
December 11, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Not so long ago, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna noodle, chicken and rice, ground beef and macaroni, these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Cooking a big holiday feast can be quite the juggling act. Not enough burners or oven capacity! Some folks rely on the kindness of neighbors, taking charge of their stoves to prep the pies or side dishes, while your primary oven is cooking up the turkey. Others work the cook/remove/reheat in-the-microwave routine with varied goodies on their menu, to better or lesser effect. But today, for those interested and ready to upgrade kitchen appliances, there are better solutions. A growing breed of multitasking ovens from mainstream brands (priced $1,500-$2,500)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|