CollectionsOxford University
IN THE NEWS

Oxford University

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 21, 2005 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three college students with ties to the area were among the 32 Americans announced as 2006 Rhodes scholars yesterday. The winners were chosen from 903 applicants representing 333 colleges and universities and will enter the University of Oxford in October 2006. They will join international scholars selected from 13 countries and regions. Luke P. Norris, a senior at Gettysburg College, plans to study international relations at Oxford. He is the college's first Rhodes scholar since 1917, according to the Rhodes Trust.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddy W. Dow, 85, of Philadelphia, who retired in 1993 as a professor of American literature at Rutgers-Camden after a 29-year career there, died of liver disease Tuesday, June 9, at home. Mr. Dow was named for the founder of the Church of Christ, Scientist, Mary Baker Eddy. "It was in respect of our paternal grandmother. She was a practitioner," Mr. Dow's sister, Miriam Gene Philleo, said from Palm Springs, Calif. Born in Gaylord, Mich., he earned a bachelor's degree at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, a master's in English at the University of Iowa in 1954, and, after studying at Oxford University in England, a doctorate in American civilization at the University of Pennsylvania in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"There but for the grace of God go I. " It's a thing people say. You see homeless people in the train station, or victims of war, disease, or misfortune. And you realize it could have been you, yet somehow it isn't. But who ever actually checks it out? Wes Moore did. Wes Moore is the name of at least two men. The two were born less than a year apart in Baltimore, separated by only a few blocks. One is now in the Maryland Correctional Institution near Jessup, Md., serving life for murdering a policeman.
SPORTS
December 27, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Steve Simpson, a Williams College graduate now attending Oxford University, won the Philadelphia Junior Court Tennis Championship by defeating Drew McGowan of the University of Pennsylvania, 6-3, 6-3, yesterday at the Racquet Club. Gabe Kinzler won the Junior-Junior title, for players 14 and younger, by beating James Price in a pro-set final, 10-5. Top-seed Wayne Fisher advanced to the second round of the Mount Laurel Holiday Men's Tennis Championship by defeating Marty McGuire, 6-3, 6-2, at the Mount Laurel Racquet Club.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Princeton University's provost has ascended to be the school's next president, the board of trustees announced Sunday. Effective July 1, Christopher L. Eisgruber, Princeton's provost for the past nine years, will succeed Shirley M. Tilghman. Tilghman announced last fall her intention to step down at the end of this academic year after 12 years in office. Eisgruber, 51, said at a Sunday afternoon announcement that he is honored to lead the university, from which he graduated in 1983 with a degree in physics.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Gerhard Miller, 78, of Doylestown, a teacher and headmaster for more than 40 years, died Monday, Sept. 1, of heart disease at his home. Mr. Miller was a descendant of two signers of the Declaration of Independence - Arthur Middleton and John Rutledge, both of South Carolina. His great-uncle George S. Gerhard founded Bryn Mawr Hospital. The George S. Gerhard Society, created in 1979, helps raise money for the hospital. Mr. Miller began his teaching career at the Haverford School in 1962.
NEWS
March 21, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert B. Stevens, president of Haverford College since 1978, will leave his post July 1 to become chancellor of the University of California at Santa Cruz. Stevens, 53, an English-born lawyer and an expert on legal history and social legislation, will be the fifth chancellor at Santa Cruz, which was opened in 1965 as an experimental school within the University of California system. His appointment was approved yesterday by the university's Board of Regents, which also named three other new chancellors in the nine-campus system, including the first two women to serve as chief executives.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carrie LaSeur has studied in France, taught English in Japan, and tutored in Philadelphia. Next, she hopes to restructure the American education system, beginning in the West. Don't laugh. The Bryn Mawr College senior will take the first scholarly steps toward that goal in the fall when she travels to England to begin studies as a Rhodes scholar. LaSeur, 21, learned Saturday that she was one of 32 Rhodes scholars picked to study at Oxford University. There were 1,275 applicants from 350 American colleges vying for the scholarships, which provide funding for study for a minimum of two years.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Reuters
Gary Owen Hughes came to Philadelphia seven years ago with pearl-like diction and the most golden of credentials: a doctorate from Oxford University and a dissertation that sparkled. But when editors for a massive Pennsylvania colonial history project read rough drafts he produced on the job, they were worried. The writing was nowhere as good as the thesis. They studied the essays more closely and drew an awful conclusion: Hughes' work was patched together from other sources - stolen goods.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Ralph Cipriano and the Associated Press contributed to this article
The news had barely sunk in: She was one of 32 students in the nation named Rhodes scholars this weekend and awarded two years of graduate study in England. But yesterday, Theresa Simmonds was talking about the "most exciting thing" of her life, and it had nothing to do with Oxford. She was talking about teaching American history to a class of 11th graders at West Philadelphia High School. "I find the kids amazingly politically and socially aware," says Simmonds, a senior studying urban and environmental studies at the University of Pennsylvania.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddy W. Dow, 85, of Philadelphia, who retired in 1993 as a professor of American literature at Rutgers-Camden after a 29-year career there, died of liver disease Tuesday, June 9, at home. Mr. Dow was named for the founder of the Church of Christ, Scientist, Mary Baker Eddy. "It was in respect of our paternal grandmother. She was a practitioner," Mr. Dow's sister, Miriam Gene Philleo, said from Palm Springs, Calif. Born in Gaylord, Mich., he earned a bachelor's degree at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, a master's in English at the University of Iowa in 1954, and, after studying at Oxford University in England, a doctorate in American civilization at the University of Pennsylvania in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"There but for the grace of God go I. " It's a thing people say. You see homeless people in the train station, or victims of war, disease, or misfortune. And you realize it could have been you, yet somehow it isn't. But who ever actually checks it out? Wes Moore did. Wes Moore is the name of at least two men. The two were born less than a year apart in Baltimore, separated by only a few blocks. One is now in the Maryland Correctional Institution near Jessup, Md., serving life for murdering a policeman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
WHAT'S NEW on Twitter? Am I doing well enough at work? Where are my kids? What's the latest on Putin - I'm going to a party tonight and I don't want to look stupid. Sound familiar? Comedian Ruby Wax said that humans "don't have the bandwidth" mentally to survive the demands of 21st-century life. With our brains constantly stimulated, many of us are on the verge of a mental breakdown - whether we are among the one in four people living with a mental illness or not. Wax tackles this issue, as well as methods to combat the chaos, in her book, Sane New World , a bestseller in Britain that came out yesterday in the U.S. She'll bring a stage companion to the book to Christ Church Neighborhood House on Nov. 13 as part of the 13th annual First Person Arts Festival, which began yesterday and runs through Nov. 15 at locations troughout the city.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Gerhard Miller, 78, of Doylestown, a teacher and headmaster for more than 40 years, died Monday, Sept. 1, of heart disease at his home. Mr. Miller was a descendant of two signers of the Declaration of Independence - Arthur Middleton and John Rutledge, both of South Carolina. His great-uncle George S. Gerhard founded Bryn Mawr Hospital. The George S. Gerhard Society, created in 1979, helps raise money for the hospital. Mr. Miller began his teaching career at the Haverford School in 1962.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the annals of Rhodes scholars, a lofty list that already includes Nobel laureates, Olympians, and a U.S. president, add two residents of the Philadelphia region. Evan Behrle of Oxford, Chester County, and Alexander Wang of Doylestown, Bucks County, were among 32 Americans awarded the prestigious scholarship Saturday. They will receive free tuition to earn graduate degrees at Oxford University in the United Kingdom. Behrle, a senior at the University of Virginia, said he planned to study urban poverty at Oxford.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philippus Miller Jr., 84, an insurance executive in Philadelphia for more than three decades, died Sunday, Aug. 18, of cancer at Beaumont, a retirement community in Bryn Mawr. Mr. Miller was a descendant of two signers of the Declaration of Independence - Arthur Middleton and John Rutledge, both of South Carolina. Known to friends as Binnie, he was a former secretary general of the Society of the Cincinnati, one of the nation's oldest patriotic organizations. Members must be descendants of officers who fought during the Revolutionary War. Formed in 1783 by the officers of the Continental Army, the group chose George Washington as its first president.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Princeton University's provost has ascended to be the school's next president, the board of trustees announced Sunday. Effective July 1, Christopher L. Eisgruber, Princeton's provost for the past nine years, will succeed Shirley M. Tilghman. Tilghman announced last fall her intention to step down at the end of this academic year after 12 years in office. Eisgruber, 51, said at a Sunday afternoon announcement that he is honored to lead the university, from which he graduated in 1983 with a degree in physics.
NEWS
November 21, 2005 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three college students with ties to the area were among the 32 Americans announced as 2006 Rhodes scholars yesterday. The winners were chosen from 903 applicants representing 333 colleges and universities and will enter the University of Oxford in October 2006. They will join international scholars selected from 13 countries and regions. Luke P. Norris, a senior at Gettysburg College, plans to study international relations at Oxford. He is the college's first Rhodes scholar since 1917, according to the Rhodes Trust.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Brian Strom has met his share of smart, educated, ambitious, dedicated people. But, the Penn Valley resident had never met a Rhodes Scholar. Now, he and his wife, Lani, are the proud parents of one. Their daughter, Shayna Strom, a senior at Yale University and 1998 graduate of the private Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, was one of 32 U.S. college students selected as a Rhodes Scholars yesterday, the scholarship trust announced.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oxford. Just saying it kind of makes you thrust out the chest and arch the back. Beverley Swanson, a 1985 Oxford University graduate, tried Wednesday night to explain the essence of attending this internationally renowned academic mecca. "It was a place where you meet some of the brightest people in the world," said the recent British transplant to New Hope. "Yes, and the same people who seemed so intelligent the night before will be walking around campus the next morning with their toothbrush in their mouth and toothpaste on their finger because they completely forgot what the hell they were doing.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|