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Oyster Bar

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NEWS
August 31, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
This is one in an occasional series of profiles of local chefs and restaurant owners. On a recent day, executive chef Vince "Vinny" Montesano had his eye on a cheesecake - or, rather, the entire dessert display. At Ludwig's Inn & Oyster Bar, a popular restaurant that is becoming known outside its northwest Chester County environs, a tray of desserts is kept in the foyer. The display is a tempting reminder that the inn specializes in homemade classics, such as New York-style cheesecake and peanut butter-cream pie. Moments before, in one of those bizarre but not-so-rare moments in the work life of the professional chef, Montesano was told that an elderly woman had taken a bite from one of the desserts.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Restaurateur Stephen P. Graham has hit a string of home runs with his "Casey" baseball-theme restaurants around the suburban Philadelphia region. Now, he's hoping the streak reaches all the way to Ludwigs Corner. Graham and his partner, West Chester real-estate lawyer W. Robert Landis, are the new owners of the former Black Angus Restaurant, a landmark in northern Chester County for more than 30 years. The Black Angus, closed for the last few months, will re-open in August as the Ludwig's Inn and Oyster Bar. Yes, Oysters.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Marshalton Inn may have a new owner, its 37th, as it celebrates its 200th anniversary next year. But the Village of Marshallton will probably still have a controversy with its 36th owner about how an 18th-century historic district copes with the development pressures of the 21st century. George Mershon has quietly placed the inn and the adjacent Oyster Bar in Marshallton, four acres of land and two liquor licenses on the block for $1.25 million. The inn and Oyster Bar have not been publicly advertised, but Kit Anstey of Anstey & Associates, the listing agent, has been showing them to potential buyers.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1987 | By Linda S. Wallace and Gerald Etter, Inquirer Staff Writers
For two years, they courted each other, eyeing each other from afar with great interest. Then yesterday, the Old Original Bookbinder's Restaurant, at 125 Walnut St., announced it was taking the plunge: It would break with a 122-year tradition by giving up the single life and venturing into a business marriage with Resorts International Inc. of Atlantic City. At a ceremony accompanied by a feast of shrimp sandwiches, Old Original Bookbinder's, Philadelphia's landmark seafood house, announced plans for a 280-seat restaurant in the Taj Mahal, a 42-story casino-hotel scheduled to open in Atlantic City in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The cafe is in crisis in its French homeland, where an average of two are now closing each day. According to a recent article in the New York Times, changing tastes (less drinking and eating out), a new smoking ban, and the global financial meltdown are responsible for bringing that storied world of zinc bars, Beaujolais and pâté to its knees. Philadelphia, thankfully, has taken on the mantle of keeping that old French joie de bistro alive. Or so it has seemed in the last year, as numerous variations on the Gallic theme mushroomed around town, ranging from an oyster bar (Coquette)
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | Daily News wire services
SAN FRANCISCO OYSTER LOVER GETS HIS DUE A San Mateo County small-claims judge awarded oyster lover Alan Wald $100, agreeing that "all-you-can-eat" means just that. The successful suit brought by Wald who insisted on consuming vast quantities of oysters at an all-you- can-eat special at the Moonraker restaurant in Pacifica, Calif., demonstrates how vulnerable establishments can be when people take the concept seriously. Wald made four trips to the oyster bar during a recent brunch before the Moonraker manager cut off his supply, saying he had eaten 75 oysters.
FOOD
November 1, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Derrick Wheeler, whose background is in business and engineering, has acted on his desire to own a fine-dining restaurant. Vella , a northern Mediterranean BYOB co-owned by his wife, Sally, has taken the former Freskada space in the Main Street at Exton Town Center (120 Woodcutter St., Exton, 610-524-3334). He's managing it with Kathleen Devine, a 30-year dining veteran. Designer Joseph D'Ambro, whose resumé includes Alba in Malvern, Sovana in Unionville and Talula's Table in Kennett Square, installed a rustic, Old World look with distressed furnishings.
FOOD
January 12, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
To say the region is in a brewpub frenzy is no understatement. Iron Hill just opened its ninth location, in Chestnut Hill, and is planning a 10th in South Jersey in 2013. In Ambler, Forest & Main Brewing Co. is due to open toward the end of the month. A bit further off is Ardmore's Tired Hands Brewing Co. Opening last month: Bill Mangan's third McKenzie Brew House , a bright, tasteful transformation of the Charlie Brown's Steakhouse in Valley Fair Shopping Center off Route 202 (324 W. Swedesford Rd., Berwyn, 610-407-4300)
FOOD
April 29, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
So our supper begins. It hasn't begun so humbly in days, various feasts and celebrations having spirited us to finer tables, in one case concluding in the take-home gift of a hollow dark-chocolate pig commemorating the birthday of a friend born in the Year of the Pig. One sprawling dinner in an Old City bistro included a passed hors d'oeuvre of tiny potato blinis topped with a bud of house-cured salmon, exquisite and sweet. Another, in a cozy townhouse dining room, was an homage to spring foraging - a mince of wild ramps beneath the pecorino in tender ravioli; and baby fava beans slick beside spongy morels in the rabbit dish.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanne Gibstein first noticed her angel at Bookbinders, the one on 15th Street, where she's been going once or twice a week for 30 years to pick up coleslaw. She sits down at the same table - Station 3, they call it, by the oyster bar - and waits for her order. When it's cold outside, they bring her coffee. When it's hot, they bring her something cold to drink. The handsome woman known to them as "Miss Jeanne" used to make the slaw herself, but that takes too much time now, and, at 78, she fits as much of the world into her day as possible.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 1, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Derrick Wheeler, whose background is in business and engineering, has acted on his desire to own a fine-dining restaurant. Vella , a northern Mediterranean BYOB co-owned by his wife, Sally, has taken the former Freskada space in the Main Street at Exton Town Center (120 Woodcutter St., Exton, 610-524-3334). He's managing it with Kathleen Devine, a 30-year dining veteran. Designer Joseph D'Ambro, whose resumé includes Alba in Malvern, Sovana in Unionville and Talula's Table in Kennett Square, installed a rustic, Old World look with distressed furnishings.
FOOD
January 12, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
To say the region is in a brewpub frenzy is no understatement. Iron Hill just opened its ninth location, in Chestnut Hill, and is planning a 10th in South Jersey in 2013. In Ambler, Forest & Main Brewing Co. is due to open toward the end of the month. A bit further off is Ardmore's Tired Hands Brewing Co. Opening last month: Bill Mangan's third McKenzie Brew House , a bright, tasteful transformation of the Charlie Brown's Steakhouse in Valley Fair Shopping Center off Route 202 (324 W. Swedesford Rd., Berwyn, 610-407-4300)
FOOD
April 29, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
So our supper begins. It hasn't begun so humbly in days, various feasts and celebrations having spirited us to finer tables, in one case concluding in the take-home gift of a hollow dark-chocolate pig commemorating the birthday of a friend born in the Year of the Pig. One sprawling dinner in an Old City bistro included a passed hors d'oeuvre of tiny potato blinis topped with a bud of house-cured salmon, exquisite and sweet. Another, in a cozy townhouse dining room, was an homage to spring foraging - a mince of wild ramps beneath the pecorino in tender ravioli; and baby fava beans slick beside spongy morels in the rabbit dish.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The cafe is in crisis in its French homeland, where an average of two are now closing each day. According to a recent article in the New York Times, changing tastes (less drinking and eating out), a new smoking ban, and the global financial meltdown are responsible for bringing that storied world of zinc bars, Beaujolais and pâté to its knees. Philadelphia, thankfully, has taken on the mantle of keeping that old French joie de bistro alive. Or so it has seemed in the last year, as numerous variations on the Gallic theme mushroomed around town, ranging from an oyster bar (Coquette)
NEWS
August 31, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
This is one in an occasional series of profiles of local chefs and restaurant owners. On a recent day, executive chef Vince "Vinny" Montesano had his eye on a cheesecake - or, rather, the entire dessert display. At Ludwig's Inn & Oyster Bar, a popular restaurant that is becoming known outside its northwest Chester County environs, a tray of desserts is kept in the foyer. The display is a tempting reminder that the inn specializes in homemade classics, such as New York-style cheesecake and peanut butter-cream pie. Moments before, in one of those bizarre but not-so-rare moments in the work life of the professional chef, Montesano was told that an elderly woman had taken a bite from one of the desserts.
FOOD
November 21, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
What happens when "Mr. Potato Skins" crosses one of his fern bars with the high-end fresh-fish concept of a Striped Bass? In the best of outcomes, it would likely end up looking like Devon Seafood Grill, a surprisingly successful compromise between corporate mass appeal and quality restauranting. Not only is it the latest addition to Rittenhouse Square's collection of tony sidewalk restaurants, it is also the most accessible. Mr. Potato Skins, by the way, would be Dan Scoggin, the guy who pioneered fern-bar casual dining at T.G.I.
FOOD
June 29, 1997 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
With a decor that features handsomely displayed model sailing ships and photos of tall ships, Radnor's new Oyster Bar could have been lifted, intact, from some upscale ocean resort. (Newport springs to mind. Or the Hamptons.) But no, this is the Main Line, where heirloom roses - and not the sea - scent the air, and the folks at the next table are more likely to be old guard than old salts. Moreover, much of what was sampled recently at the restaurant seemed to have missed the boat when it comes to the sort of pristinely simple fare that folks crave at a seaside restaurant.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanne Gibstein first noticed her angel at Bookbinders, the one on 15th Street, where she's been going once or twice a week for 30 years to pick up coleslaw. She sits down at the same table - Station 3, they call it, by the oyster bar - and waits for her order. When it's cold outside, they bring her coffee. When it's hot, they bring her something cold to drink. The handsome woman known to them as "Miss Jeanne" used to make the slaw herself, but that takes too much time now, and, at 78, she fits as much of the world into her day as possible.
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | Daily News wire services
SAN FRANCISCO OYSTER LOVER GETS HIS DUE A San Mateo County small-claims judge awarded oyster lover Alan Wald $100, agreeing that "all-you-can-eat" means just that. The successful suit brought by Wald who insisted on consuming vast quantities of oysters at an all-you- can-eat special at the Moonraker restaurant in Pacifica, Calif., demonstrates how vulnerable establishments can be when people take the concept seriously. Wald made four trips to the oyster bar during a recent brunch before the Moonraker manager cut off his supply, saying he had eaten 75 oysters.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Marshalton Inn may have a new owner, its 37th, as it celebrates its 200th anniversary next year. But the Village of Marshallton will probably still have a controversy with its 36th owner about how an 18th-century historic district copes with the development pressures of the 21st century. George Mershon has quietly placed the inn and the adjacent Oyster Bar in Marshallton, four acres of land and two liquor licenses on the block for $1.25 million. The inn and Oyster Bar have not been publicly advertised, but Kit Anstey of Anstey & Associates, the listing agent, has been showing them to potential buyers.
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