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Oyster Creek

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NEWS
September 12, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Employees at the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant violated a safety cooling requirement early yesterday morning, and some records about the incident were intentionally destroyed, the plant's operator said. The plant had been shut down since Thursday for maintenance work, and the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission ordered yesterday that it remain shut during a federal investigation of the safety violation and the apparent coverup attempt. The plant cannot return to service until the NRC gives its approval, said Karl Abraham, spokesman at the commission's regional office in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Cleanup of radioactive tritium that leaked from the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in Ocean County, New Jersey, last year is beginning this week. Plant owner Exelon Corp. will start pumping efforts on two monitoring wells in the Cape May and Cohansey aquifers below the power plant, where levels of tritium that far exceeded health standards issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were documented in June, according to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. – Officials say power was fully restored at the Oyster Creek nuclear plant on Saturday afternoon, several days after the nation's oldest operating plant lost off-site power. The outage began Monday morning, when an electrical disruption caused the plant's reactor to automatically shut down. Officials believe the power loss was caused by the grounding of a high-voltage line that provides electricity to the Ocean County nuclear plant. Personnel spent the week performing minor maintenance that can be done only while the reactor is offline.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - A year ago, New Jersey environmental officials reached a deal with the owners of the nation's oldest nuclear power plant to shut it down 10 years earlier than expected. In return, the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station would not have to build costly cooling towers. On Wednesday, state officials kept their end of the deal, granting Chicago-based Exelon Corp. a permit that will enable the plant to continue drawing water from Oyster Creek to help cool the nuclear reactor.
NEWS
November 7, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission yesterday approved the restart of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant, which has been out of operation since a violation of safety requirements in September. The NRC reported that the plant, in Forked River, Ocean County, N.J., has adopted new training and monitoring procedures to prevent a repeat of the incident. Workers violated federal safety limits at the plant Sept. 11 by closing off cooling water that keeps the nuclear fuel from melting.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - In this southern Ocean County municipality, where it's a compliment to be called a Piney, and hunting and fishing on Barnegat Bay are long-held traditions, residents have been neighbors with the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant for more than 40 years. The community has come to depend on the 700 jobs and $70 million payroll the facility brings to this rural and industrially barren fringe of the Pinelands. Residents know that the plant's presence has kept their property taxes relatively low, and have made an uneasy peace with what proximity to Oyster Creek could mean if disaster were to strike.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day that Exelon Corp. officially announced the closing of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in New Jersey, state officials unveiled a sweeping plan to revitalize Barnegat Bay, the ailing coastal waterway that provides the plant's cooling water and has borne the brunt of its effects. The closure of the nation's oldest operating nuclear plant, which is to happen by the end of 2019, is neither the first - nor likely the last - among the nation's aging nuclear fleet. It raises the question of what will replace them.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1997 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GPU Inc., the New Jersey utility, said yesterday that in the face of deregulation, it may sell or shut down its Oyster Creek nuclear generating station in Lacey Township, Ocean County. The price for the 28-year-old plant would be $700 million, said Fred D. Hafer, GPU president and chief operating officer. If no buyer is located, the shutdown would begin in 2000, Hafer said. That would eliminate about 7 percent of GPU's 9,000 megawatts of generating capacity. Hafer said that regulation of the electric utility industry has served the public well but that it was time for a change to competition.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
Nuclear plant is too dangerous It has been proved conclusively that when nuclear plants are closed, cancer rates in children drop dramatically. The study by the Radiation and Public Health Project checked children's baby teeth for radioactive strontium 90, which results only from nuclear-bomb explosions and nuclear reactors. This is why the Tooth Fairy Project, as the study is known, should continue to check children's baby teeth for strontium 90 and why the legislature should provide funding for this research.
NEWS
March 29, 2009
Coast Guard crews from Atlantic City and Barnegat Light, N.J., yesterday recovered the body of missing boater Ken Madsen, 52, in Barnegat Bay near Oyster Creek. Earlier in the day, New Jersey state police reported a man missing from a boat they had found aground, with its engine running, near Waretown, N.J. A wallet and recreational gear were aboard. The state police reported stopping Madsen in the boat while he was underway for undisclosed reasons.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When David Lochbaum, director of the Nuclear Safety Project for the Union of Concerned Scientists, began to hear of the Sandy-related storm problems at the Oyster Creek nuclear plant in Ocean County, he had an "I-told-you-so moment. " In March 2011, Japan was reeling from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster that stemmed from natural events - an earthquake and tsunami. "What we learned at Fukushima is being reinforced by Sandy," said Lochbaum, who says that the process that regulators use to license nuclear plants is flawed.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. – Officials say power was fully restored at the Oyster Creek nuclear plant on Saturday afternoon, several days after the nation's oldest operating plant lost off-site power. The outage began Monday morning, when an electrical disruption caused the plant's reactor to automatically shut down. Officials believe the power loss was caused by the grounding of a high-voltage line that provides electricity to the Ocean County nuclear plant. Personnel spent the week performing minor maintenance that can be done only while the reactor is offline.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - A year ago, New Jersey environmental officials reached a deal with the owners of the nation's oldest nuclear power plant to shut it down 10 years earlier than expected. In return, the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station would not have to build costly cooling towers. On Wednesday, state officials kept their end of the deal, granting Chicago-based Exelon Corp. a permit that will enable the plant to continue drawing water from Oyster Creek to help cool the nuclear reactor.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BAY HEAD, N.J. - Everyone knows Barnegat Bay is in trouble. The real question is, how bad are things? To get answers, the state Department of Environmental Protection will team with research institutions across the state to carry out 10 studies of aspects of Barnegat Bay to get a comprehensive view of the health of the struggling waterway. The answers won't all be in until 2014. The studies will examine such things as pollution nutrients in the water, crabs and clams, and the prevalence of stinging jellyfish and algae blooms.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Joshua Adam Hicks, Inquirer Staff Writer
April Woerner lived through earthquakes as a child in Japan and the Philippines, so the tremor she felt in Cherry Hill on Tuesday was unmistakable. "It seemed like it was coming up from the earth," said the 68-year-old woman, a Cherry Hill resident for 35 years whose father served in those countries while in the Army. "It was an irregular shaking, kind of a side-to-side movement. It felt too solid to be a truck going by and creating a vibration. You felt this came from a deeper source.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Joshua Adam Hicks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
April Woerner lived through earthquakes as a child in Japan and the Philippines, so the tremor she felt in Cherry Hill Tuesday was unmistakable. "It seemed like it was coming up from the earth," said the 68-year-old woman, a Cherry Hill resident for 35 years whose father served in those countries while in the Army. "It was an irregular shaking - kind of a side-to-side movement. It felt too solid to be a truck going by and creating a vibration. You felt this came from a deeper source.
NEWS
June 28, 2011
TOMS RIVER, N.J. - A task force set up to examine emergency plans at New Jersey's four nuclear reactors in the aftermath of the Japanese disaster wants more pumps at the plants, and is seeking to ensure that emergency generators at three plants in Salem County are interconnected enough to function in a disaster. The state's Nuclear Review Task Force was formed in late March, shortly after the disaster at a nuclear plant brought on by an earthquake and tsunami that knocked out power to critical cooling systems.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Wednesday declined to review the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's license renewal of Exelon Corp.'s Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in New Jersey. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia said the NRC did not abuse its discretion when it rejected a challenge of the license renewal by a coalition of environmental groups. "We are confident that the NRC's review of Exelon's application was well-reasoned, and we will not second-guess technical decisions within the realm of its unique expertise," the court said.
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