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Oyster Sauce

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FOOD
January 5, 2012
The owners of American Sardine Bar are trying to keep the bar focused on beer, but the small menu of sandwiches that chef Scott Schroeder has created already dominates the idle chat. There's a fried P.B.&J. ($5) that has a Frosted Flake crust, and the Krab Kake ($8) on a soft, buttered roll, in which crab stick (hence the "K") is formed into a crisped, burger-shaped patty. Don't skimp on the sides - the roasted Brussels sprouts are kicked up with oyster sauce and pickled Thai bird chiles.
FOOD
August 2, 1987 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Cantaloupe, the melon with the orange flesh and the delicate sweetness, is at its juicy best on these sweltering days of midsummer. Serve a cool wedge wrapped in prosciutto as a dinner appetizer. Chop a few chunks into a fruit salad. Squeeze some fresh lime over melon balls and make a light, refreshing dessert. Or give yourself the special treat of freshly made cantaloupe-ginger sorbet. In this age of excellent, work-saving small appliances, making the sorbet is unbelievably fast and easy, perfect for the cook "In a Hurry.
FOOD
January 31, 2013 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
These noodles are a fun and approachable dish good for a busy weeknight or to celebrate Chinese New Year.   Shrimp and Shiitake Noodle Stir-Fry   Makes 4 servings 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1 small sweet onion, sliced 7 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, thinly sliced 1 red bell pepper, cored and thinly sliced 91/2-ounce package thick Asian-style noodles, such as udon ...
FOOD
March 8, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Chinese food, once thought too exotic for home cooks, has been so de- mystified in recent years that many dishes have actually become American family standbys. Stir-fry recipes abound. So do East-West combinations such as hamburger casseroles made crunchy with water chestnuts or chicken dishes enlivened with soy sauce and fresh ginger. The menu that follows - one designed for cooks In a Hurry - requires some ingredients that are slightly unusual but that store well, so you can keep a supply on hand after an initial shopping trip.
FOOD
October 8, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I recently grabbed a late-night dinner at The Continental at 2nd and Market streets. I fell in love with the Rad Na Thai Chicken. Any chance of prying the recipe out of the chef? Tammy Dotts, Pottstown Dear Tammy, The Continental Restaurant and Martini Bar is owned by former concert promoter Steven Starr. In 1995, he took over the old Continental Diner, hired a designer from New York's SoHo and the Continental was reborn. Chef de Cuisine Raul Bacordo came to the Continental from New York's China Grill.
FOOD
October 20, 1993 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
This one-wok meal is as fast, fresh and versatile as can be. And you don't even have to own a wok. In fact, I much prefer stir-frying in my large nonstick skillet. Stir-frying is perhaps the Asian culinary contribution to the Western notion of the one-dish meal. It's cooked in just a few minutes, meaning that more time is spent slicing, mincing and assembling ingredients than in the actual process of cooking. The secret to the successful stir-fry is organization. Read over the recipe, measure, chop, mince or slice all the ingredients and set them out in little bowls before you heat the skillet.
FOOD
November 25, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Original Philadelphia Neighborhood Cookbook (Camino Books, $11.95) is a culinary testament to a city known for its ethnic areas. It's also a book filled with an interesting variety of recipes. Irina Smith and Ann Hazan - both Philadelphia cooking instructors - have covered the city's neighborhoods from Germantown to South Philadelphia, exploring kitchens and uncovering pots as they went along. The result is a paperback offering instructions for diverse fare ranging from lamb stuffed with oysters from Head House Square to stuffed cabbage from Manayunk.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Ever walk through a restaurant on the way to your table and be so tantalized by the displayed desserts that you wished you could order some, tout de sweet? That's the way I felt at the Inn at Sugar Hill in Mays Landing, N.J. Well, sort of. It was only after some less than sterling appetizers and entrees that I greeted the arrival of the dessert tray with a sense of relief. This is a roundabout way of saying, save room for dessert. Better yet, stop by for dessert after feasting on world-class ribs from the Kingfish, just up Route 40 near Buena.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011
Try these main-dish recipes as the centerpiece for your Chinese New Year celebration. CLAMS WITH BLACK BEAN SAUCE 2 quarts water 30 medium-sized clams, scrubbed with a stiff brush to remove sand and grit For the sauce: 2/3 cup chicken stock 1 1/2 tablespoons oyster sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon sugar Pinch of white pepper...
FOOD
October 1, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Most restaurants find their way to this review column because they are recommended or talked about. Lai Lai made it on sheer size. The new and attractive Chinese restaurant occupies the site of the late La Camargue. Seeing the address and knowing that the floor space is about twice that of most Chinatown restaurants, I reasoned that the new owners must feel fairly certain that they know their business well enough to fill all those tables and pay Walnut Street rents. As occasionally happens, I was right.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 31, 2013 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
These noodles are a fun and approachable dish good for a busy weeknight or to celebrate Chinese New Year.   Shrimp and Shiitake Noodle Stir-Fry   Makes 4 servings 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1 small sweet onion, sliced 7 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, thinly sliced 1 red bell pepper, cored and thinly sliced 91/2-ounce package thick Asian-style noodles, such as udon ...
FOOD
January 5, 2012
The owners of American Sardine Bar are trying to keep the bar focused on beer, but the small menu of sandwiches that chef Scott Schroeder has created already dominates the idle chat. There's a fried P.B.&J. ($5) that has a Frosted Flake crust, and the Krab Kake ($8) on a soft, buttered roll, in which crab stick (hence the "K") is formed into a crisped, burger-shaped patty. Don't skimp on the sides - the roasted Brussels sprouts are kicked up with oyster sauce and pickled Thai bird chiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011
Try these main-dish recipes as the centerpiece for your Chinese New Year celebration. CLAMS WITH BLACK BEAN SAUCE 2 quarts water 30 medium-sized clams, scrubbed with a stiff brush to remove sand and grit For the sauce: 2/3 cup chicken stock 1 1/2 tablespoons oyster sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon sugar Pinch of white pepper...
FOOD
October 8, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I recently grabbed a late-night dinner at The Continental at 2nd and Market streets. I fell in love with the Rad Na Thai Chicken. Any chance of prying the recipe out of the chef? Tammy Dotts, Pottstown Dear Tammy, The Continental Restaurant and Martini Bar is owned by former concert promoter Steven Starr. In 1995, he took over the old Continental Diner, hired a designer from New York's SoHo and the Continental was reborn. Chef de Cuisine Raul Bacordo came to the Continental from New York's China Grill.
FOOD
October 20, 1993 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
This one-wok meal is as fast, fresh and versatile as can be. And you don't even have to own a wok. In fact, I much prefer stir-frying in my large nonstick skillet. Stir-frying is perhaps the Asian culinary contribution to the Western notion of the one-dish meal. It's cooked in just a few minutes, meaning that more time is spent slicing, mincing and assembling ingredients than in the actual process of cooking. The secret to the successful stir-fry is organization. Read over the recipe, measure, chop, mince or slice all the ingredients and set them out in little bowls before you heat the skillet.
FOOD
October 1, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Most restaurants find their way to this review column because they are recommended or talked about. Lai Lai made it on sheer size. The new and attractive Chinese restaurant occupies the site of the late La Camargue. Seeing the address and knowing that the floor space is about twice that of most Chinatown restaurants, I reasoned that the new owners must feel fairly certain that they know their business well enough to fill all those tables and pay Walnut Street rents. As occasionally happens, I was right.
FOOD
March 8, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Chinese food, once thought too exotic for home cooks, has been so de- mystified in recent years that many dishes have actually become American family standbys. Stir-fry recipes abound. So do East-West combinations such as hamburger casseroles made crunchy with water chestnuts or chicken dishes enlivened with soy sauce and fresh ginger. The menu that follows - one designed for cooks In a Hurry - requires some ingredients that are slightly unusual but that store well, so you can keep a supply on hand after an initial shopping trip.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Ever walk through a restaurant on the way to your table and be so tantalized by the displayed desserts that you wished you could order some, tout de sweet? That's the way I felt at the Inn at Sugar Hill in Mays Landing, N.J. Well, sort of. It was only after some less than sterling appetizers and entrees that I greeted the arrival of the dessert tray with a sense of relief. This is a roundabout way of saying, save room for dessert. Better yet, stop by for dessert after feasting on world-class ribs from the Kingfish, just up Route 40 near Buena.
FOOD
November 25, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Original Philadelphia Neighborhood Cookbook (Camino Books, $11.95) is a culinary testament to a city known for its ethnic areas. It's also a book filled with an interesting variety of recipes. Irina Smith and Ann Hazan - both Philadelphia cooking instructors - have covered the city's neighborhoods from Germantown to South Philadelphia, exploring kitchens and uncovering pots as they went along. The result is a paperback offering instructions for diverse fare ranging from lamb stuffed with oysters from Head House Square to stuffed cabbage from Manayunk.
FOOD
August 2, 1987 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Cantaloupe, the melon with the orange flesh and the delicate sweetness, is at its juicy best on these sweltering days of midsummer. Serve a cool wedge wrapped in prosciutto as a dinner appetizer. Chop a few chunks into a fruit salad. Squeeze some fresh lime over melon balls and make a light, refreshing dessert. Or give yourself the special treat of freshly made cantaloupe-ginger sorbet. In this age of excellent, work-saving small appliances, making the sorbet is unbelievably fast and easy, perfect for the cook "In a Hurry.
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