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Oysters

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NEWS
May 17, 2012
8-ounce tub of oysters, chopped, with juice 1 pint clam juice 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons flour 2 cups milk 1 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon black pepper 1. Add oysters to 1 pint of clam juice and bring to a boil. 2. Make white sauce: In a saucepan, melt the butter over a medium flame and stir in the flour. When it starts to bubble, take the pan from the fire and slowly stir in 1 cup of milk, letting the flour absorb the liquid. Put the pan back over the heat and just as slowly add 1 cup more of milk, never ceasing the stirring.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Tired of shelling out a lot of clams to sell their oysters, some seafood dealers in Pennsylvania are making a stink and have asked the state legislature for help. The target of their wrath is a 1925 law that the state Agriculture Department has paid particular attention to of late - a law requiring seafood shops to sell oysters by count. What that means is that retailers who buy their oysters in bulk, then repackage them for resale in smaller containers, can't merely dump them into new packages.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
One recent afternoon, the oysters (and a few clams) were making their star turns at Oyster House on Sansom Street - a mouthwatering postscript to a South Jersey shellfish story all but ended by a stunting parasite in 1950. Out came icy platters of Dias Creek's Venus offerings, informed by local vegetation; Betsy's Cape Shore Salts, farmed by the daughter of Hal Haskin, the researcher credited with rescuing the fishery; and a briny new baby - reminiscent of New England's coveted Wellfleet - called Forty North: Its racks line the flats off Barnegat Bay, its meat is salty with ocean.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - Lying 50 yards off the shore of a remote cove along a stretch of mud flats on the Delaware Bay - where prehistoric man once cultivated oysters with a kind of primitive aquaculture - modern-day researchers and aqua-farmers have been working hand in hand for more than a decade to seed and grow New Jersey's beleaguered oyster industry. And the results are paying off in a farm-to-table Cinderella story that has taken oysters out of the depths of blight- and disease-decimated shellfish populations, through the thorny trial and error of scientific research, and into a recovery phase that is producing a marketable product fit for gourmands.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
Stand by for increased shelling at a Monmouth County, N.J., naval base. State environmental officials are allowing an experimental oyster colony at a Navy pier in Middletown to expand. The goal of researchers from Rutgers University and the New York/New Jersey Baykeeper is to reestablish the once-plentiful shellfish in the Raritan Bay to help improve its water quality. The state Department of Environmental Protection allowed the groups to use nearly 11 acres off the Earle Naval Weapons Station to grow oysters and expand its research reef.
FOOD
March 29, 2000 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
When Jimmy Garrett first started shucking oysters, his hands used to get tired. Handling a knife with tired hands can be dangerous - he used to slip once in a while and cut himself. But that was in the old days, close to 50 years ago. These days, Garrett wouldn't think twice about shucking 350 oysters on a busy day at Old Original Bookbinders in Society Hill. The renowned restaurant can handle close to 1,000 people in its sprawling dining rooms - imagine what happens if everybody orders oysters.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc Zitter enjoyed a special plate of oysters at the Washington Inn in Cape May last weekend. They were his, grown on the tidal flats of the lower Delaware Bay and among the first he has sold to restaurants since leaving his job as a heavy-equipment operator 18 months ago to become an oyster farmer. "The display on the plate was pretty awesome," Zitter, who just three weeks ago started selling his oysters under the brand Salty Lady, said in an interview Thursday. "It was nice to see, like I finally made it. " Zitter, 43, is part of a slowly and quietly emerging oyster-farming industry along the Delaware Bay, where oysters were nearly wiped out in the second half of the 20th century by disease and pollution.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fates of a migratory shorebird, horseshoe crabs, and the state's oyster industry have converged at the center of a debate over how each should be accommodated where they come together every spring, in New Jersey tidal flats along the Delaware Bay. Wildlife advocates hope to restore the dwindling population of red knots, small birds that federal authorities listed as a threatened species about three months ago. The bird's round-trip migration of...
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
HIGHLANDS, N.J. - Researchers have gathered enough data to be able to say that an oyster-restoration program wrecked by Hurricane Sandy will work, and they now have more than $16,000 from the Dave Matthews Band to help reestablish the research on a Navy pier. The band, through its Bama Works Fund, gave the grant to the NY/NJ Baykeeper group, which will use it to rebuild and relocate an aquaculture building destroyed by the storm. Meredith Comi, director of Baykeeper's pilot project at the Earle Naval Weapons Station, said many nets holding the oysters were ripped from the pier during the storm.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
Viewed from outside, the fire hall here seemed to rock and sway Friday night in an effort to contain all the noise and commotion inside. "It doesn't get rowdy, and you know why?" declared Jim Atkinson, 65, of Millsboro. "There are no females here. " But there were 1,200 men in there. Twelve hundred men comprising every conceivable shape, size and socioeconomic status. They milled about elbow-to-elbow in the packed hall, swilling beer and eating oysters and ham sandwiches.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The afternoon wore on and Snockey's, the century-old South Philly oyster house, began running out of things - crab cakes, littleneck clams, time. One customer, Arlene Campbell, was told by co-owner Ken Snock that her takeout order was the last one Snockey's would ever serve. She walked out with boxes filled with shrimp, clams, and salmon for her family. It was standing-room-only around the small bar, and behind it staff bustled, shucking the last oysters and serving the last beers and Bloody Marys to the last rush of customers who would ever walk through Snockey's doors.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - As the Jersey Shore's fledgling oyster aquaculture industry continues to expand, a new study proposes that it be restricted because of its potential harmful impact on the endangered red knots and other migratory birds along the state's Delaware Bay shoreline. An environmental report by the state Endangered and Nongame Species Program suggests that oyster aqua-farmers should have limited access to their crops on the bay during the spring migration of the red knot.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What it is: Sometimes one thing - perhaps a song or a place - can encapsulate an entire summer in one neat sensory keepsake. Maybe it's a meal in which tastes and textures converge to create a bit of summer bliss on a plate - like the broiled Atlantic flounder with Jersey Fresh vegetables served at the Oyster Creek Inn in Leeds Point. Chef Scott Kuppel says the rustic restaurant, at the edge of a salt marsh, usually begins serving the fish dish in June, just when delectable Jersey-grown veggies such as sweet corn, tomatoes, and spinach are coming into season.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
One recent afternoon, the oysters (and a few clams) were making their star turns at Oyster House on Sansom Street - a mouthwatering postscript to a South Jersey shellfish story all but ended by a stunting parasite in 1950. Out came icy platters of Dias Creek's Venus offerings, informed by local vegetation; Betsy's Cape Shore Salts, farmed by the daughter of Hal Haskin, the researcher credited with rescuing the fishery; and a briny new baby - reminiscent of New England's coveted Wellfleet - called Forty North: Its racks line the flats off Barnegat Bay, its meat is salty with ocean.
FOOD
July 3, 2015 | Craig LaBan
Here is an excerpt of Craig LaBan's online chat : Craig LaBan: I learned the very sad news this morning that my friend Ed Hitzel - the South Jersey food critic, publisher, and broadcaster - died Monday night at 64 of a heart attack while eating at one of his favorite restaurants, Joe Italiano's Maplewood Restaurant in Hammonton. Eddie, as he was known to friends and listeners of his "Table for One" radio show (on WOND-1400 AM and, more recently, WIP-610 AM), had become a true South Jersey restaurant icon, publishing a well-read magazine (Ed Hitzel's Restaurant Magazine)
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - Lying 50 yards off the shore of a remote cove along a stretch of mud flats on the Delaware Bay - where prehistoric man once cultivated oysters with a kind of primitive aquaculture - modern-day researchers and aqua-farmers have been working hand in hand for more than a decade to seed and grow New Jersey's beleaguered oyster industry. And the results are paying off in a farm-to-table Cinderella story that has taken oysters out of the depths of blight- and disease-decimated shellfish populations, through the thorny trial and error of scientific research, and into a recovery phase that is producing a marketable product fit for gourmands.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fates of a migratory shorebird, horseshoe crabs, and the state's oyster industry have converged at the center of a debate over how each should be accommodated where they come together every spring, in New Jersey tidal flats along the Delaware Bay. Wildlife advocates hope to restore the dwindling population of red knots, small birds that federal authorities listed as a threatened species about three months ago. The bird's round-trip migration of...
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There's a Manhattan aging in a barrel on a bar by the beach, flanked by 29 taps of craft beer. There's another bar, a so-called speakeasy, tucked behind a tiny wine store where diners buy bottles at $15 over retail to go with some wacky small plates, or choose from more than 280 whiskies. And what is that sound I keep hearing at the Jersey Shore? It's the sizzle of prime steaks on the grill. The shell-crack of crabs dusted in Old Bay. The dull click of raw-bar oysters being unhinged, their briny liquor glistening in the salt air. This is the summer of moving on by the sea, with a fine drink in hand and some old-school indulgences on my plate.
FOOD
November 28, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
Thanksgiving dinner routinely tottered at the edge of meltdown at our house. It all got to the table, miraculously. And it got shoveled down in a matter of minutes. Maybe we were trying to put it behind us, this thing that had nearly poleaxed Mom. We were eager for the reliably serene second act: the next-day turkey clubs. They were then, as they are today, often better than the original, actually: peaceable, predictable, unhurried, enduring. We asked a few local chefs to give Thanksgiving leftovers their best shot.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc Zitter enjoyed a special plate of oysters at the Washington Inn in Cape May last weekend. They were his, grown on the tidal flats of the lower Delaware Bay and among the first he has sold to restaurants since leaving his job as a heavy-equipment operator 18 months ago to become an oyster farmer. "The display on the plate was pretty awesome," Zitter, who just three weeks ago started selling his oysters under the brand Salty Lady, said in an interview Thursday. "It was nice to see, like I finally made it. " Zitter, 43, is part of a slowly and quietly emerging oyster-farming industry along the Delaware Bay, where oysters were nearly wiped out in the second half of the 20th century by disease and pollution.
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