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Oz

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NEWS
January 8, 2010
PHILADELPHIA is still the Emerald City, but we no longer resemble Oz. At least not the one on HBO that protrayed hellish conditions in an overcrowded prison. According to a story in yesterday's Daily News, the city has managed to reduce the prison population by just over 1,000 - from 9,767 to 8,587. Credit goes to Mayor Nutter, Prisons Commissioner Louis Giorla, and Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Everett Gillison for moves that included transferring many prisoners to the state system, where they belonged, and moving nonviolent offenders more quickly through the system.
NEWS
May 17, 2004
FOR MORE than three years, I have suspected that the Bush administration is psychotic. I haven't room to list all the reasons, but here are some musings on its pathology: First, we know there is a well-established link between conservatism and fear. I would add isolation and the ignorance that often accompanies it to this phenomenon. Bush and his bully boys and girl are motivated not only by corporate greed, but also by their own chickenness - and the unconsious projection of their own terrors and hostilities (and guilts)
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Set designer Rob Odorisio is too tall to be a Munchkin, but he has an elfin gleam in his eye as he winds his way through the bang and clatter of the Walnut Street Theater's scene shop. A bona fide holiday extravaganza - utilizing the Royal Shakespeare Company's adaptation of the MGM film - his "Wizard of Oz" plays through Jan. 7. With a production cost estimated at $60,000, "The Wizard of Oz" is the largest musical the Walnut has ever mounted. Its multiple sets, massive moving components, working Yellow Brick Road, special effects, cast of 50 (plus two dogs)
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The tornado that whisked Dorothy out of Kansas in the "Wizard of Oz" had nothing on that human tornado named Judy Garland who played her. Talk about a force to be reckoned with! More than 30 years after her death, Garland still fascinates. And in a new biography, "Get Happy" (Random House, $29.95), veteran journalist Gerald Clarke recaps her life in more incredible detail than has ever been told before. Garland was unusually gifted. She could sing. She could act. She could mesmerize an audience.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
"Tis the season. The annual round of theatrical extravaganzas has begun, each production hoping to whet your festive appetite. The Walnut Street Theatre's contribution to the holiday menu is "The Wizard of Oz. " The company's staging of the beloved MGM classic "The Wizard of Oz" is ambitious. Unfortunately, this holiday spectacle is technically akin to Mother Goose's little girl with the curl in the middle of her forehead. When it's good, it's very, very good. But when it's bad . . . To be sure, the company starts out at a deficit - trying to duplicate on stage what took multiple takes, even with the magic of filmmaking - but even without such trickery, there are certain things you just gotta get right, when you're wrangling Dorothy's magical mystery tour through the land of Oz. Like, the people who "fly" can't look so obviously like actors wearing harnesses attached to (thick)
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | by Denis Hamill, New York Daily News
Tom Fontana sleeps four hours a night. No one can figure out where he finds the time. He rises at 5:30 every morning in his New York apartment. For the next five hours, he hunches over his desk writing new episodes of the groundbreaking HBO prison series "Oz," or rewriting scripts for "Homicide," which many critics call the best drama on network TV. Fontana co-produces both shows with director Barry Levinson, and the pair also has about a dozen other TV shows in various stages of development, including a firefighter drama for CBS and an old-fashioned variety show - "Ed Sullivan with a '90s, twisted edge" - for ABC. By 11 a.m., Fontana is on the elaborate set of "Oz" on the sixth floor of the Chelsea Market building in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"This yellow brick road seems to go on forever," sighs our weary heroine toward the first-act finale of The Wizard of Oz, which runs through Jan. 7 at the Walnut Street Theatre, but she doesn't know the half of it. Everything in this misbegotten adaptation seems to go on forever. Everything, that is, except the yellow brick road itself. There is no yellow brick road - which, inasmuch as the script slavishly echoes the screenplay of the much-loved movie, seems decidedly odd. But perhaps one shouldn't complain about the omission, for virtually every other scenic effect is of such tacky ineptitude that you might think the production was designed by the humbug wizard himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | By Kay Gardella, New York Daily News
Jack Haley Jr. remembers he was about 8 when he first saw MGM's "The Wizard of Oz. " "I was with Gary Crosby, who is working with me now. It was a Saturday morning in a Beverly Hills theater, when kids got in for 11 cents. It was an eye-popping, jaw-dropping experience. "The first thing I thought was, 'Gee, there's my father up there, there's Uncle Bert, there's Uncle Ray and there's that nice Miss Garland, who served me tea on the set," he said, referring to Jack Haley Sr. (the Tin Man)
NEWS
November 19, 2002
ANOTHER election has come and gone. As usual, the majority of Philly voters went for the Democratic candidates. We will now have a Democratic governor along with our Demo mayor. Hey, folks: D.C. will be under Republican control. The feds will probably give this state/city the same respect as a fur salesman would get at a PETA rally. Politics in Philadelphia reminds me of the city of Oz. Somewhere in City Hall, Frank Keel stands behind a big curtain and pretends that he is Mayor Street.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
In Hollywood, facelifts are so commonplace it won't raise an eyebrow that on the eve of its 75th birthday, The Wizard of Oz has had some work done. Digital wizards have converted the beloved 1939 film to 3-D for a one-week-only engagement at Imax theaters from Friday through Sept. 26. Oz is so hallucinatory to begin with that a 3-D retrofit threatens, with the force of a Kansas twister, to blow moviegoer minds. Happily, the conversion has been done with restraint and respect.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
UNDER PRESSURE from Congress, TV physician Mehmet Oz yesterday offered to help "drain the swamp" of unscrupulous marketers using his name to peddle so-called miracle pills and cure-alls to millions of Americans desperate to lose weight. Oz appeared before the Senate's consumer-protection panel and was scolded by chairwoman Claire McCaskill , D-Mo., for claims he made about weight-loss aids on "The Dr. Oz Show. " Oz, a cardiothoracic surgeon, acknowledged that although he never endorsed specific companies or brands, he did, perhaps, gush a bit too much about green coffee and other supplements.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Acting swiftly on parents' wishes, Philadelphia School District Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. on Friday said Luis Muñoz Marín Elementary would not be given to a charter company to run. Parents voted overwhelmingly - 223-70 - on Thursday for the struggling K-8 school at 3300 N. Third St. to remain a traditional district school. In a separate vote, the school's advisory council voted, 11-0, to reject Aspira of Pennsylvania, the charter company vying to take over the school. Hite, in a statement, said he was grateful to parents and community members who helped guide the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Dozens of writers, directors, filmmakers, and composers have adapted L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz for TV, stage, and film. I'm not going to pretend to know the differences that distinguish each version. But I will say that Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Wizard of Oz , now at the Academy of Music, offers a visually satisfying, much fuller musical take on this staple of American culture. Lloyd Webber based his show on the 1939 Judy Garland-driven film, keeping much of the plot and most of Harold Arlen and E.Y. "Yip" Harburg's songs intact.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
ADDING NEW songs to the score from the 1939 film version of "The Wizard of Oz"? Isn't that akin to painting earrings and sunglasses on the Mona Lisa? That's what David Andrews Rogers thought. But not anymore. "When I was first offered the project, I approached it with a little uncertainty, thinking, it ran well in London, and ran well in Toronto, but we're talking America, we're talking about a group of people who really take, not just fondness for, but ownership of, this iconic film," said Rogers, who on Tuesday hits the Academy of Music as musical director for Andrew Lloyd Webber 's stage version of what is arguably the most beloved American film of all time.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mehmet Oz's followers believe he is a trustworthy, serious-minded (and hot) physician. His equally fervent flock of critics say he is a fad-foisting, ratings-grubbing (and smart) TV celebrity. In the 10 years since Oprah dubbed him "America's Doctor," the 53-year-old Oz has shown he is comfortable in both roles. "I just absolutely like him," said Maria Southard, 57, a food-service supervisor in the Philadelphia public schools. "I believe what he says and repeat it at home and work.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
To view video of Bordentown's Thompson Street 'Oz'-themed Halloween, visit www.inquirer.com/oz
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
In Hollywood, facelifts are so commonplace it won't raise an eyebrow that on the eve of its 75th birthday, The Wizard of Oz has had some work done. Digital wizards have converted the beloved 1939 film to 3-D for a one-week-only engagement at Imax theaters from Friday through Sept. 26. Oz is so hallucinatory to begin with that a 3-D retrofit threatens, with the force of a Kansas twister, to blow moviegoer minds. Happily, the conversion has been done with restraint and respect.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE QUICK-THINKING actions and sheer strength of will of one police officer may have helped save Officer Edward Davies' life Tuesday, sources said yesterday. Officer Shawntai Cooper was in the Almonte Mini Market with Davies when the struggle with Eric Torres took place, sources said. It was Cooper who carried Davies out to her police cruiser after he was shot and drove him to Temple University Hospital, the sources said. A police spokesman did not return multiple requests for comment on Cooper's actions yesterday, which were being labeled by many as "heroic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Watch the tale of two young women who meet in the Land of Oz in the Broadway musical Wicked , at the Academy of Music through Aug. 4. The audience will learn the story of the two who became the evil Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good Witch of the North, both before and after Dorothy set foot in Munchkinland. It's an intriguing tale of two girls who meet in college - one born despised for her emerald green skin, the other her popular, beautiful roommate. How did these two lives entwine, separate, then reconnect?
NEWS
July 5, 2013
IF YOU'RE hoping to spot veteran entertainer John Davidson around town during his extended run in the Academy of Music's production of "Wicked," here's a hint: You might have a better chance running into him in the wilds of South Jersey. Rather than stay in downtown hotels during his engagement as the Wizard in the 10-year-old blockbuster musical that runs through Aug. 4, Davidson and Rhonda , his wife of three-plus-decades, are spending the 40-week "Wicked" tour in an RV that, for their local visit, will be anchored at a Gloucester County campground.
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