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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2008 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
FOR TODAY'S schoolchildren, how would the ascent of Barack Obama to the presidency really resonate? Obviously, everyone would mark this as a most historic occasion, the first time a man of color had achieved the highest leadership post in the land. But would young people be able to put this landmark into true, historic context and cause for celebration, contemplating the depths of discrimination and the many battles for civil rights that were waged for this day of justice and equality to finally prevail?
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WHYY is a relatively low-profile station in the world of public broadcasting. It doesn't produce flashy, syndicated television shows like Frontline, from Boston's WGBH, or Nature, from New York's WNET. Among public stations in the top-10 markets, it is in the middle of the pack for budget and staff. WHYY is tops in one category - how much it rewards its chief executive. President and CEO William J. Marrazzo's potential pay, benefits and expenses totaled $740,090 in the year ending June 30, 2007, according to its most recent tax filing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1991 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
People run hot or cold on Sting. The jut-jawed, strong-willed British singer/songwriter, bassist and actor has wrung much fame from the Police, from a dozen fair-to-mediocre movie and theater roles ("Dune" to "Threepenny Opera") as well as from a successful solo music career and lots of pontificating for the likes of Amnesty International and the Save-the-Rainforest campaign. Sting's new album package, "The Soul Cages," will probably leave some people feeling both hot and cold about the man. Certainly this is his most sombre, serious effort to date - a sad suite describing a life as a shipbuilder's son and sailor from northern industrial England.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three bidders on separate projects in an $18.1 million expansion and renovation for Rancocas Valley Regional High School have sued the district, delaying an award until at least late this month. The companies bid in three of the five project categories - general contracting, ventilation and plumbing. They sued the district in Burlington County Superior Court after a second round of bids was rejected in February for coming in about $400,000 over budget. In all, there were about 25 bids in the five categories.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Like the stylish full-size Dodge pickup, the new GMC Sonoma Highrider has taken a wonderful step backward. The Highrider, however, has achieved throwback status in a very different way. Its retrogression is mechanical rather than aesthetic. Indeed, this special GMC 4wd compact pickup does fly in the face of recent practice. Since few people regularly take their four-wheel-drive sport utilities and pickups off the beaten path, the manufacturers have been trying to make these off-road vehicles as comfortable as possible on road, often sacrificing off-road facility in the process.
NEWS
July 12, 2009
President Obama's $787 billion economic recovery plan hasn't made much of a dent in the recession, but taxpayers can't afford talk of another "stimulus" bill. Like many Democrats, Gov. Rendell was hard-pressed in Washington the other day to specify how the federal government's plan is helping Pennsylvania. At first Rendell offered a guess that the federal aid, $1 billion for the state so far, has created "a couple of thousand" jobs. That works out to $500,000 per job, hardly an efficient use of taxpayer dollars.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1994 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James and Sarah Freed have a modern marriage. They met at a high-tech company. Then started their own. The firm, Impac Technology Inc., is in its fourth year and recently was named by the Wharton Small Business Development Center as one of the 100 fastest-growing private firms in the Philadelphia area. "It has been a lot of extra weekends and a lot of long hours," says Sarah Freed. The Exton firm manufactures and packages software. But the Freeds don't write software.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A mistrial was declared yesterday in the case of a Franklinville man accused of accepting an overnight package from Los Angeles that contained about one pound of marijuana. Judge Donald A. Smith Jr. of Gloucester County Superior Court said Charles Simmons would have to be retried after a jury forewoman, following about eight hours of deliberations, announced that the jury could not agree on any charge. "We couldn't get past the first one," the forewoman said when the judge asked if there had been consensus on any of the three charges: possessing, possessing with intent to distribute, and conspiring to distribute marijuana.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1995 | By Cindy Anders, FOR THE INQUIRER
Waiting for their sons in the school parking lot one day, Sheldon Gerstenfeld, a Chestnut Hill veterinarian, and Roger Kehr, a packaging engineer, had an idea. Gerstenfeld told Kehr he was trying to figure out how to ship tropical fish, but he couldn't figure out how to keep the fish right-side up. Kehr, having spent lots of time on sailboats, suggested a gimbal, the mechanism that keeps a ship's compass level. With a gimbal device, no matter how the package is turned, gravity would keep it right-side up. It was such a basic concept that they were certain someone must have been come up with it before, so Kehr called a patent attorney.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1995 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A problem was dogging Alpo Petfoods. At a time when the "treats" category of pet food was increasing, its Alpo Snaps weren't moving off the shelf, despite the company's name recognition. The problem: Serious packaging. The solution: Lighten up. "Our packaging was all wrong," said Jay Kemper, a former Alpo employee who, at the time, was the manager of the Alpo Snaps brand, a snack food for Rover. So Alpo, of Allentown, now owned by Nestle Food Co., turned to the Bailey Design Group, of Plymouth Meeting, for a packaging makeover.
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