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Paint Manufacturers

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NEWS
May 12, 1993 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that the Philadelphia Housing Authority does not have the right to sue paint manufacturers in federal court for the cost of removing poisonous lead paint from public housing. The city cannot prove which paint manufacturer sold the paint used in specific residential units, and it cannot hold the paint industry liable in general for damage to children who ate or inhaled lead from the paint, the court ruled. Arthur H. Bryant, executive director of Trial Lawyers for Public Justice and co-counsel for the city, called the ruling "a terrible injustice.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1992 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 21,000 Pennsylvania and New Jersey painters who contend they suffered health problems because they used lead paints may proceed with a lawsuit against paint manufacturers, a federal judge has ruled. The ruling, in a case filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, was another wedge in a growing local move to hold paint and pigment makers legally accountable for health problems allegedly caused by lead paint. Previous suits filed in Pennsylvania against the lead-paint industry have been dismissed in their initial stages because they sought damages based on manufacturers' market share, a formula that is not accepted by Pennsylvania courts as a way of assigning responsibility.
NEWS
May 31, 2006
CHRIS Brennan's recent column about lead paint purported to outline the dispute between a landlord and tenant over lead paint in an Overbrook apartment. He takes easy shots at the property owner, and in the process displays no sense of what it takes to eradicate the lead paint infesting properties across the nation. Every paint company in the country sold dangerous lead paint for decades. Landlords just bought it, and used it, like everybody else. The cost of eradicating the problem is enormous, often more than the total value of a property.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I seem to be allergic to latex, as I get a rash whenever I put on dishwashing gloves - but I want to paint my living room. Are there other environmentally safe options to latex paint? - K A: I am very sorry you have to deal with this. Allergic responses to latex products aren't unusual, but they can range from a very serious reaction to an irritating rash. If you suspect you're allergic to latex, you should visit a doctor. The good news - as far as your living room goes - is that what we've been calling "latex" paint hasn't had real latex in it for a long time.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1999 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The paint-making industry is not just about mixing chemicals for the right shade of blue anymore. Consolidation, technology, environmental concerns and marketing also are major components. M.A. Bruder & Sons Inc., a 100-year-old family-owned business, illustrates the changes. "For years, we were in a business where demand was greater than supply," said Jim Bruder, chief executive officer of the privately held Broomall company. "But today, we're in a buyer's market. " Between 1977 and 1996, the number of paint manufacturers in the United States fell 18 percent, from 1,288 to 1,055, according to the National Paint and Coatings Association in Washington.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Our bedroom was rebuilt by the previous homeowner after a fire with what I'm guessing is an old style of wallboard; wallpaper was then put directly over that wallboard. I've been trying to remove the wallpaper, but it is completely an uphill battle. Where the seams were spackled, the wallpaper comes off easily when dampened with water. But on most of the rest of the space, the paper might as well be glued to the thin layers of cardboard-like wallboard. Once the paper is saturated and scraping is attempted, trying to get it off often tears or gouges the surface of the wallboard.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neighbors of Camden County's contaminated Kirkwood Lake got some good news and some bad news this week. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a proposed $14 million major cleanup of a federal Superfund site in Gibbsboro and Voorhees. The contaminated cluster of miles of land and waterways includes the county-owned lake. The area, one of more than 100 Superfund sites remaining in New Jersey, was contaminated by paint-makers that operated in the area from the mid-1800s until the late 1970s.
LIVING
February 5, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I would like to repaint my kitchen, but have a question. The walls have some mold on them despite the use of a dehumidifier in the basement. Is there an additive or special paint I can use to prevent mold and fungus buildup with the new paint? Answer: From what the experts - residential painters and remodeling contractors - say, you'll have to first determine the cause of the moisture that provides the medium for mold to grow. Although most paint manufacturers are producing products with mold-growth inhibitors - Zinsser, Sherwin-Williams, and Benjamin Moore, to name three - and designed for high-moisture areas such as kitchens and bathrooms, just covering over the problem isn't enough.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Just for a moment, say you don't like the way your kitchen looks but you really don't have almost $16,000 to complete a "minor kitchen remodel. " What about doing a few things, such as painting your cabinets, adding hardware, and changing the color of the tile if it doesn't go with the new look of the cabinets? Mary Jo Peterson, a kitchen designer from Brookfield, Conn., and perennial speaker at trade shows, says there have been times when she has simply repainted cabinet doors and changed the hardware to give things that new look.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cans of spray paint may soon be harder to buy than assault weapons. Philadelphia City Councilman Frank DiCicco yesterday introduced a bill that would ban the retail sale of spray paint and wide indelible markers - to anybody and everybody, no matter what they want it for. It's just the latest salvo in the city's battle against an insidious problem that is destroying property values and the quality of life everywhere. The bill will be listed for a public hearing, probably next month, before coming up for a vote in Council.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I seem to be allergic to latex, as I get a rash whenever I put on dishwashing gloves - but I want to paint my living room. Are there other environmentally safe options to latex paint? - K A: I am very sorry you have to deal with this. Allergic responses to latex products aren't unusual, but they can range from a very serious reaction to an irritating rash. If you suspect you're allergic to latex, you should visit a doctor. The good news - as far as your living room goes - is that what we've been calling "latex" paint hasn't had real latex in it for a long time.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neighbors of Camden County's contaminated Kirkwood Lake got some good news and some bad news this week. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a proposed $14 million major cleanup of a federal Superfund site in Gibbsboro and Voorhees. The contaminated cluster of miles of land and waterways includes the county-owned lake. The area, one of more than 100 Superfund sites remaining in New Jersey, was contaminated by paint-makers that operated in the area from the mid-1800s until the late 1970s.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
It's dark, dreary, and occasionally damp. Spiders lurk. Stinkbugs lie dead in the corners. And on the shelves: Ugh. Old cans of paint, their labels obscured by drips, their lids encrusted with clumped hues of yellow, green, and ecru. That's how one corner of my basement looks. And perhaps yours, too. It's evidence of my un-eco paint past. You could color those sins by the numbers. But while my old cans have been drying - one, it turned out, was more than a decade old - the paint industry has been progressing, growing ever greener.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Our bedroom was rebuilt by the previous homeowner after a fire with what I'm guessing is an old style of wallboard; wallpaper was then put directly over that wallboard. I've been trying to remove the wallpaper, but it is completely an uphill battle. Where the seams were spackled, the wallpaper comes off easily when dampened with water. But on most of the rest of the space, the paper might as well be glued to the thin layers of cardboard-like wallboard. Once the paper is saturated and scraping is attempted, trying to get it off often tears or gouges the surface of the wallboard.
LIVING
February 5, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I would like to repaint my kitchen, but have a question. The walls have some mold on them despite the use of a dehumidifier in the basement. Is there an additive or special paint I can use to prevent mold and fungus buildup with the new paint? Answer: From what the experts - residential painters and remodeling contractors - say, you'll have to first determine the cause of the moisture that provides the medium for mold to grow. Although most paint manufacturers are producing products with mold-growth inhibitors - Zinsser, Sherwin-Williams, and Benjamin Moore, to name three - and designed for high-moisture areas such as kitchens and bathrooms, just covering over the problem isn't enough.
NEWS
May 31, 2006
CHRIS Brennan's recent column about lead paint purported to outline the dispute between a landlord and tenant over lead paint in an Overbrook apartment. He takes easy shots at the property owner, and in the process displays no sense of what it takes to eradicate the lead paint infesting properties across the nation. Every paint company in the country sold dangerous lead paint for decades. Landlords just bought it, and used it, like everybody else. The cost of eradicating the problem is enormous, often more than the total value of a property.
LIVING
January 21, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One thing in life I've always been certain of is this: There is no good reason to paint a room boring beige or lifeless white. Over the years, I've had a coral bathroom, a deep periwinkle den, and a bedroom with celadon green walls, pale yellow trim, and a ceiling of sky blue. For a decade, my kitchen was the color of yellow squash. Now, after a renovation, I have caramel walls, cobalt blue cabinets, and beechnut green tile. In a world where more than half of all paint sold is white, where cream-colored interiors have long defined good taste, the reaction I get to my adventurous color schemes always surprises me. "Gee," one visitor after another has murmured wistfully.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Just for a moment, say you don't like the way your kitchen looks but you really don't have almost $16,000 to complete a "minor kitchen remodel. " What about doing a few things, such as painting your cabinets, adding hardware, and changing the color of the tile if it doesn't go with the new look of the cabinets? Mary Jo Peterson, a kitchen designer from Brookfield, Conn., and perennial speaker at trade shows, says there have been times when she has simply repainted cabinet doors and changed the hardware to give things that new look.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1999 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The paint-making industry is not just about mixing chemicals for the right shade of blue anymore. Consolidation, technology, environmental concerns and marketing also are major components. M.A. Bruder & Sons Inc., a 100-year-old family-owned business, illustrates the changes. "For years, we were in a business where demand was greater than supply," said Jim Bruder, chief executive officer of the privately held Broomall company. "But today, we're in a buyer's market. " Between 1977 and 1996, the number of paint manufacturers in the United States fell 18 percent, from 1,288 to 1,055, according to the National Paint and Coatings Association in Washington.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cans of spray paint may soon be harder to buy than assault weapons. Philadelphia City Councilman Frank DiCicco yesterday introduced a bill that would ban the retail sale of spray paint and wide indelible markers - to anybody and everybody, no matter what they want it for. It's just the latest salvo in the city's battle against an insidious problem that is destroying property values and the quality of life everywhere. The bill will be listed for a public hearing, probably next month, before coming up for a vote in Council.
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