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NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Perhaps because she was a woman working in a period dominated by male artists, or perhaps because Hodgkin's disease forced her to stop painting when her talent was in full flower, the late Reva Urban has been overlooked in chronologies of American painting over the last 30 years. The exhibition of her work in the Arthur Ross Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania suggests that Urban's reputation deserves to be refurbished. If these works are typical, during the early to mid-1960s she was as innovative as any of her contemporaries, and more so than most.
NEWS
March 2, 2015
RENOWNED Bucks County portrait artist Nelson Shanks has painted everyone from Princess Diana to President Bill Clinton and from Pope John Paul II to Marisa Tomei. He and his wife, Leona, are the founders of Studio Incamminati, an art school on 12th Street near Callowhill. On a recent Friday, as the north light of a chilly afternoon flooded his Andalusia studio, Shanks, 77, chain smoked cigarettes and drank Diet Cokes while painting Gabrielle, a beautiful young belly dancer, on a 7-by-5-foot canvas.
LIVING
March 10, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
In Jane Golden's eyes, Philadelphia is the city of murals - an outdoor canvas to be covered with tributes to hometown heroes, unforgettable victims, and vivid celebrations of the rhythms of urban life. Turn a corner in North Philadelphia and see Jackie Robinson sliding home, the moment frozen on the side of a three-story brick building. Or swing by Broad and Spring Garden Streets for a towering tribute to women. Philadelphia has about 2,000 of these murals. Soon it will have more.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all African American artists, Henry Ossawa Tanner is probably the best known. His work hangs in the White House as well as the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But paintings by Tanner (1859-1937), who grew up here, studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins, and then emigrated to Paris, do not often come on the market - not major ones, anyway. That is why widespread attention is being paid to Bill Bunch's auction of more than 200 paintings, which begins at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Concordville Inn. Midway in that sale, Bunch will offer a previously unknown painting by Tanner.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The fabric panels that Maine artists Gayle Fraas and Duncan Slade are exhibiting at Works Gallery are described as "quilts," but they're really quilted paintings. They're executed in dyes thickened with seaweed extract on cotton broadcloths that have been finished like quilts - backing, binding, etc. - and embellished with decorative stitching. That said, it's hard to think of the pieces as quilts, because they're easel-scale and framed like paintings or prints. Yet their fiber-art character ultimately prevails.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It was suggested in this space two weeks ago that museums of American art might have outlived their usefulness. After seeing "Paris 1889: American Artists at the Universal Exposition," at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, we are pleased to report that this is emphatically not the case. For without a museum like the academy, an exhibition like this would not be possible. The academy is admirably equipped to mount such a historical re- creation, so much so that it's difficult to tell when the permanent collection ends and the exhibition begins.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Michael Manzavrakos' cast-iron sculptures and mixed-media works on paper at Dolan/Maxwell Gallery are on easy terms with expressionism. These pieces epitomize the gestural quality of the work of this artist, who is well-known in the Midwest but is making his solo debut here on the East Coast. The works illustrate the close connection between sculpture and painting in Manzavrakos' artistry. Moreover, the patinated surfaces of these abstract sculptures include zones of color, demonstrating that Manzavrakos believes sculptural expression doesn't need to restrict itself to purely sculptural means.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Highlighted by furnishings from the exclusive Rittenhouse Club in Center City and by an unusual painting by Arthur B. Carles of a man who may be Leopold Stokowski, Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia next week will hold a three-day, 1,100-lot catalogue sale rich in Philadelphia tradition. The Carles is expected to sell for between $15,000 and $20,000 when it is offered at the auction's third session at 10 a.m. next Saturday. According to the $20 catalogue, it is similar - and probably relates - to a drawing in the Phillip Jamison collection in West Chester that is identified as Stokowski.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Steve Riedell didn't invent the shaped painting, but he has given it an unusual twist. He creates the painting and its support separately, then combines them. The method is demanding, but the result is an object that, paradoxically, accentuates its "painted" quality. Riedell's exhibition at Larry Becker Contemporary Art contains 12 such paintings made over the last several years. Some are essentially flat, while others project from the wall like sculptures. Each piece is a wood construction derived from an architectural source covered with painted canvas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015
Q:  Please help break up this fight! My husband and I are painting our front room. I think the trim should be painted before the wall; my husband thinks you should do the opposite. I'm just glad we both like the color of the ceiling or we would fight about that, too. We have a month's worth of kitchen cleaning chores on the line? Who's right? - Emily A: Oh, no! I love helping people with their decorating problems, but I don't like it when people lose bets on my account.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
A glance down the hallway toward the gallery of the Woodmere Art Museum, where its 74th Annual Juried Exhibition begins, reveals the quirky aesthetic of jurors and artist brothers Steven and Billy Dufala. In the distance, an enormous, featureless, off-white creature shaped like a cross between a duck and a sheep lies on the floor. Behind it is a large painting of two women standing side by side against a starry night, one holding an ungainly cloudlike form, the other's face hidden by a mass of droopy hair - or something like hair.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - Call this summer drama 50 shades of yellow. And then gray. And back to yellow again. In this overpopulated beach town, the summer parking battles are being fought with cans of paint. And a parade of trips to Municipal Court. Hey, the accused are arguing, this is how it's always been done in Sea Isle: You paint the strip of the curb in front of your house yellow to make sure cars don't block your driveway, or maybe even you make it a little longer to save a space.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based paint manufacturer Axalta Coating Systems and NASCAR star Jeff Gordon said Tuesday the racer will use the iconic rainbow paint scheme for the final time on Aug. 22 in Bristol, Tenn. A four-time champion in stock car racing's best circuit, Gordon plans to retire after this season. He gained most of his fame driving a car with a multi-colored rainbow on the hood. The rainbow wrapped around the word "DuPont," which was his team's main corporate sponsor. The Carlyle Group bought Wilmington-based DuPont's performance paint division in 2013 and renamed the company Axalta.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2015
Q: My husband and I want to paint the kitchen, great room, and dining area walls a lighter color. (The builder painted the whole house a gross, muddy tan color.) We like white, but we went to the paint store and couldn't believe how many options there were. How do you pick the right one? - Amy A: I love white walls lately! And I understand how hard it is to choose the right white. Not only does every paint manufacturer make hundreds of colors, a third of them seem to be light enough to be white - and that doesn't include the actual whites.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The Painted Bride hosted a celebration of the saxophone Tuesday night. The PRISM Quartet welcomed two of the most celebrated performers in modern jazz for a show blurring the lines between jazz and classical music. In this latest installment in the Heritage/Evolution series, PRISM's season finale added Chris Potter and Ravi Coltrane to the mix. The show opened with two pieces by PRISM founding member and tenor player Matthew Levy. The pastoral "Found," written in honor of the composer's second wedding anniversary that night, began with Coltrane playing solo.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
No American professional sport is more obviously wrapped in nonathletic businesses than auto racing. That's why NASCAR - and especially this weekend - is important for Philadelphia-based Axalta Coating Systems. Axalta makes paint in thousands of colors and formulas for cars, trucks, buses, and industrial fixtures. It sells business-to-business, working through distributors, big body-shop groups, and automakers in 130 countries, generating first-quarter revenue of close to $1 billion.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
POPE FRANCIS once wrote that "an authentic faith always involves a deep desire to change the world, to transmit values, to leave this earth somehow better than we found it. " Since 1984, the city's Mural Arts Program has done just that at nearly 4,000 locations throughout Philadelphia. Now, the Mural Arts Program is teaming up with the World Meeting of Families to honor Pope Francis and his visit to Philadelphia in September with a 4,239-square-foot mural on the side of a North Philadelphia school.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a kid growing up in West Chester, Neilson Carlin wanted to be a comic book artist. His fondness for fantasy still peeks through in his Kennett Square studio - a bobblehead doll of the Lord of the Rings character Gollum; the Fantastic Four T-shirt he wore while teaching on a recent day; and the comic book figurines on a shelf of supplies. But after he met his devoutly Catholic future wife, Carlin converted to Catholicism. Now 44, he devotes his talent to large-scale drawings of a different kind of "heroes in costume.
REAL_ESTATE
May 24, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, I replied to a reader's question about "ghost shadows" on his ceiling. It isn't as spooky as it sounds. The reader was asking about paint he could use to hide the lines, which reappeared after he had painted the ceiling three years ago. Of course, I responded to his request for a paint recommendation by suggesting a shellac-based product that I have used to cover water stains from leaks that have been repaired and to keep...
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