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NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Perhaps because she was a woman working in a period dominated by male artists, or perhaps because Hodgkin's disease forced her to stop painting when her talent was in full flower, the late Reva Urban has been overlooked in chronologies of American painting over the last 30 years. The exhibition of her work in the Arthur Ross Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania suggests that Urban's reputation deserves to be refurbished. If these works are typical, during the early to mid-1960s she was as innovative as any of her contemporaries, and more so than most.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell, Staff Writer
After a one-year hiatus, the relaunched Philadelphia antiques show - among the nation's most widely respected events of its kind - returned this weekend with an emphasis on fine art amid its many treasures. Prominent on the show's floor, an "extremely rare" $595,000 copper weather vane of a fireman's hat rested steps from a painting of an outsized bull that's become "priceless" to its antiques-dealer owner. In its 54th showing, the rebranded Philadelphia Antiques and Art Show overflowed with decorative arts, fine porcelain, and uncommon furnishings spanning more than three centuries.
LIVING
March 10, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
In Jane Golden's eyes, Philadelphia is the city of murals - an outdoor canvas to be covered with tributes to hometown heroes, unforgettable victims, and vivid celebrations of the rhythms of urban life. Turn a corner in North Philadelphia and see Jackie Robinson sliding home, the moment frozen on the side of a three-story brick building. Or swing by Broad and Spring Garden Streets for a towering tribute to women. Philadelphia has about 2,000 of these murals. Soon it will have more.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all African American artists, Henry Ossawa Tanner is probably the best known. His work hangs in the White House as well as the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But paintings by Tanner (1859-1937), who grew up here, studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins, and then emigrated to Paris, do not often come on the market - not major ones, anyway. That is why widespread attention is being paid to Bill Bunch's auction of more than 200 paintings, which begins at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Concordville Inn. Midway in that sale, Bunch will offer a previously unknown painting by Tanner.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The fabric panels that Maine artists Gayle Fraas and Duncan Slade are exhibiting at Works Gallery are described as "quilts," but they're really quilted paintings. They're executed in dyes thickened with seaweed extract on cotton broadcloths that have been finished like quilts - backing, binding, etc. - and embellished with decorative stitching. That said, it's hard to think of the pieces as quilts, because they're easel-scale and framed like paintings or prints. Yet their fiber-art character ultimately prevails.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It was suggested in this space two weeks ago that museums of American art might have outlived their usefulness. After seeing "Paris 1889: American Artists at the Universal Exposition," at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, we are pleased to report that this is emphatically not the case. For without a museum like the academy, an exhibition like this would not be possible. The academy is admirably equipped to mount such a historical re- creation, so much so that it's difficult to tell when the permanent collection ends and the exhibition begins.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Michael Manzavrakos' cast-iron sculptures and mixed-media works on paper at Dolan/Maxwell Gallery are on easy terms with expressionism. These pieces epitomize the gestural quality of the work of this artist, who is well-known in the Midwest but is making his solo debut here on the East Coast. The works illustrate the close connection between sculpture and painting in Manzavrakos' artistry. Moreover, the patinated surfaces of these abstract sculptures include zones of color, demonstrating that Manzavrakos believes sculptural expression doesn't need to restrict itself to purely sculptural means.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Highlighted by furnishings from the exclusive Rittenhouse Club in Center City and by an unusual painting by Arthur B. Carles of a man who may be Leopold Stokowski, Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia next week will hold a three-day, 1,100-lot catalogue sale rich in Philadelphia tradition. The Carles is expected to sell for between $15,000 and $20,000 when it is offered at the auction's third session at 10 a.m. next Saturday. According to the $20 catalogue, it is similar - and probably relates - to a drawing in the Phillip Jamison collection in West Chester that is identified as Stokowski.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Steve Riedell didn't invent the shaped painting, but he has given it an unusual twist. He creates the painting and its support separately, then combines them. The method is demanding, but the result is an object that, paradoxically, accentuates its "painted" quality. Riedell's exhibition at Larry Becker Contemporary Art contains 12 such paintings made over the last several years. Some are essentially flat, while others project from the wall like sculptures. Each piece is a wood construction derived from an architectural source covered with painted canvas.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, STAFF WRITER
The first Phoenixville VegFest, a celebration of all things vegan, will bring a cornucopia of nonanimal food and drink, adoptable pigs that paint abstracts, and a guy who calls himself "Gangster Vegan" to Bridge and Main Streets on Saturday afternoon. "Phoenixville has become a very vegan-friendly town," said Jeesely Soto, who lives there and organized VegFest with two fellow volunteers from the Peace Advocacy Network, a regional nonprofit promoting "peaceful existence through veganism, social justice, and respect for the Earth's inhabitants and resources.
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
JIM SCHWARTZ noted the impact of rookie corner Jalen Mills when Schwartz was asked Thursday why Eric Rowe was traded. "Jalen was a seventh-round pick and really exceeded our expectations, and probably anybody's expectations for him," Schwartz said. "We're looking at a situation where we're going to have four corners active. Jalen has played some nickel for us, also. That really wasn't on Eric's plate. "Eric worked really hard and did everything we asked from him. We certainly wish him the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: My fiancé and I just bought our first house together. We are doing some painting before we move in, but whoever did the previous paint job was really sloppy with the ugly wall color, and it's all over the beautiful wood trim. I can't scrape it off without scratching the wood. If we paint over the sloppy areas, it'll look like we messed up. What should we do? - W. A: How frustrating. I've had to deal with cleaning up sloppy paint lots of times, especially in older houses. It probably explains why a lot of homeowners started to paint their trim.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly and Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITERS
The weary farmboy who once graced the cover of the Saturday Evening Post might sleep forever, but not the FBI. On Thursday - 40 years since Norman Rockwell's painting Taking a Break was stolen from a Cherry Hill home - the bureau's Art Crime Team issued a new appeal for any information related to the theft. It was one of several items taken during a June 30, 1976, break-in at the home of Robert and Teresa Grant, according to the FBI. The bureau and the Cherry Hill Police Department say they are still seeking leads, Also known as Lazybones , the 25-by-28-inch oil was featured on the cover of the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The offer was simple. An artist was organizing a come-as-you-are exploration of older women's faces - devoid of makeup. With hair untended. That invitation, delivered to 20 friends between the ages of 65 and 73, came from South Philadelphia painter Ellensue Gross, who has long been fascinated by facial features. "In them," she said, "I really wanted to capture the character, emotions, and spirit of my subjects. " Along the way came a growing realization that women felt enormous pressure to not visibly age - and were relentlessly wooed by the marketplace to follow the fantasy.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A Funeral Mass will be held Saturday, June 4, for Paul J. Englebert of Wayne, a painting contractor, who died Thursday, April 28, from congestive heart failure in a long-term care facility in Fort Myers, Fla. He died on his 75th birthday. He and wife Diane Batchelder Englebert had bought a condo in Fort Myers last year. Born in Wayne, Mr. Englebert graduated from Radnor High School in 1959. Known to friends as "Bertie," he was quarterback on the Radnor Raiders football team that broke Lower Merion's winning streak in both 1957 and 1958.
REAL_ESTATE
May 16, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
My recent column announcing that I am painting the exterior of my house for the last time brought expressions of concern from those who don't like the words last time . And, thankfully, a couple of painting questions, which is the reason I write these columns. John Czuba's question concerning painting aluminum siding is one I have gotten before over the years, but it's one that always merits a response. Yes, you can paint aluminum siding, and the website of the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House is my go-to on all broad-brush matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I seem to be allergic to latex, as I get a rash whenever I put on dishwashing gloves - but I want to paint my living room. Are there other environmentally safe options to latex paint? - K A: I am very sorry you have to deal with this. Allergic responses to latex products aren't unusual, but they can range from a very serious reaction to an irritating rash. If you suspect you're allergic to latex, you should visit a doctor. The good news - as far as your living room goes - is that what we've been calling "latex" paint hasn't had real latex in it for a long time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Before the mid-'70s, a psychiatrist would have been mad to admit he was gay. Quite literally. At the time, homosexuality was listed as a mental illness in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . Philadelphia psychiatrist John Ercel Fryer, however, did just that in 1972 - and of all places at the American Psychiatric Association's annual conference in Dallas. "I am a homosexual. I am a psychiatrist," he said, opening a now-famous speech. To protect himself - he already had lost a job at the University of Pennsylvania because he was gay - he wore a rubber Halloween mask, calling himself Dr. H. Anonymous.
REAL_ESTATE
April 25, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
I know I talked about painting in a recent column, but that was just about my plans for the exterior of the house this year. In the meantime, the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House has come up with suggestions for sprucing up a house to get it ready for sale. The top 10 touch-ups: Make sure the front door is well-painted. It will make a great first impression. In the entry hall, touch up areas where the paint shows marks or nicks, and clean every surface. Better yet: Put on a fresh coat of neutral-colored paint throughout.
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