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Painting

NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
It wasn't exactly his line of work, but Darrell Davis was doing OK. He rolled the dove-gray paint on the walls of the West Chester Community Center auditorium with a smooth rhythm, made easier with the commercial power roller. "I was volunteered," joked Davis, community center board member and dean of administration at Lincoln University. "We've been working on this a long time, and seeing it come to fruition is kind of nice," he said. Davis and 10 other volunteers spent a morning last weekend painting the high-ceilinged auditorium in its final transformation from dingy sometime-gym and community meeting room to the high-tech cultural center of West Chester's black community.
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | By Liz Marshall, Special to The Inquirer
"She looks very sad. One of her relatives died, and she's patting her dog for comfort. " That was the interpretation of the Mary Cassatt painting Woman With Dog expressed by Amy Hentz, a Unionville Elementary School fifth grader. The Brooklyn Bridge, a painting by Joseph Stella dominated by strong lines and shapes, looked like a roller coaster to fifth-grader Tony Skiadas. And the reaction to Forest With a Squirrel, by Franz Marc, which depicts a red squirrel surrounded by vivid colors and abstract shapes?
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
It is a scene that never was and never will be - but you can't take your eyes off it. Two 19th-century women idly chatting next to the Betsy Ross house . . . a young boy playing on a field in front of Carpenter's Hall . . . Independence Hall standing stately in the center of a grassy mall . . . City Hall off to the left . . . the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the background . . . Elements of a historic city brought together in one painting, defying...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Ordinarily one would look askance at a museum's giving one of its trustees a solo exhibition. But in the case of Katharine Steele Renninger, the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown passes muster. Renninger is the secretary of the museum board, but she's also a Bucks County painter of long standing and noticeable achievement. On that basis, she clearly deserves this retrospective. Renninger is a hard-core realist, a painter of architecture, objects and artifacts. Specifically, she is a painter of patterns, shadows and shapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"A Collector's Eye" is a small gem of an exhibition at the James A. Michener Art Museum that samples American painting of the 1930s and '40s. The works come from the collection of Bucks County resident John Horton, who has been collecting American art of this period since the early 1980s. There are only 14 paintings in the show, but they cover a broad swath of stylistic and philosophical territory, from social realism to the more politically neutral regionalism to the fascination with the industrial milieu portrayed by the precisionists.
NEWS
March 2, 1987 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
On a recent late afternoon, a 30ish-looking woman walked into a small gallery near Front and Chestnut streets. The Ellin/Baker Gallery had just closed, but she didn't know it. The proprietors were in the back. Out front, a tall black man and his 14-month-old son hardly looked up from their father-and-baby babble when she stepped into the near-vacant room. "Who's Earl Lewis?" asked the woman, Carol Hallstead. "I'm Earl Lewis," the man answered, scooping up his son and walking toward her. "I like your work and it's nice to meet you," Hallstead said as she turned to study two walls of watercolor paintings, almost all a portal into a Philadelphian's vision of his city and its people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
At the Arcadia University art gallery, you can watch German artist Vera Lehndorff disappear, or nearly so, right before your eyes. If her name doesn't ring a bell, try Veruschka. That was Lehndorff's persona as a super model during the 1960s, when she appeared in Vogue and other leading fashion magazines. Lehndorff stars in a series of "performance" photographs from the 1970s and '80s made by her collaborator, Holger Tr?lzsch. The images they created together, shown also in a video program, are startling and provocative.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
While some students traded books for beachballs this summer, others traded books for brushes and bucks. College Pro Painters, a business that employs students 18 and older as painters, foremen and franchise owners, came to the Main Line area in 1982. In 1983, gross sales were about $70,000. In 1988, the expanded Middle States Division - which includes New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware - had gross sales of just under $2.9 million. This summer, about 1,100 students - including some in Kansas and Colorado - worked as painters and foremen in the Middle States Division, which is headquartered in Valley Forge.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Mary Frank, perhaps best known for her ceramic sculptures of fragmented figures, turned to painting in the mid-1980s because of health problems. The result is mixed. Frank's paintings are more emotionally charged than her sculptures, although not as visually powerful. Yet they confirm that her view of life is intrinsically poetic and expressed through mystical visions. A traveling exhibition of 31 paintings created since 1985, organized at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, N.Y., has come to the Allentown Art Museum.
LIVING
December 20, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Though Shirelle, 13, lives in a residential center with 50 other children, she gets to do many activities that take time and supervision. To her joy, she and a friend were recently allowed to cook a meal just for themselves in the big kitchen. She was amazed at the different ingredients that went into one recipe. And they were downright astounded that it all turned into a meal. There is severe neglect and abuse in Shirelle's past. She is in intensive therapy and takes medication to help her deal with her feelings.
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