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Palestinian Refugees

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NEWS
December 26, 1988 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a boy, Muhammad Aabdeh was taught that this refugee district north of Jerusalem was no more than a stop-off, that someday - possibly soon - he and his family would be going home, home to Lydda, the village they had fled during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. Aabdeh grew up in Kalandia, got married and built a comfortable house here, but he still believes that Lydda - now the Israeli town of Lod - is where he belongs. Thus, his feelings about a peace initiative launched earlier this month by Yasir Arafat, leader of the Palestine Liberation Organization, are decidedly mixed.
NEWS
May 12, 1998 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ibrahim Ali Rifai and his rapidly growing family are one indication that the Palestinian refugee problem, now a half-century old, is not likely to fade away with the mere passage of time. Rifai is an ebullient man, born 62 years ago in a village near the Sea of Galilee. He has two wives, 15 children and about 35 grandchildren. In the entire extended clan, no one has a passport. Not one family member is a citizen of any nation, although all the children and most of the grandchildren were born in Lebanon.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Arab leaders endorsed a Saudi peace proposal at their summit in Beirut, Lebanon, yesterday. Here is a look at what the proposal contains and means, and the history surrounding some of the key points. Question: What is the proposal? Answer: Arab nations would establish "normal relations" with Israel in exchange for three conditions: Israeli withdrawal from the lands it took in the 1967 Six-Day War, the creation of an independent Palestinian state with its capital in East Jerusalem, and permission for Palestinian refugees who have fled Israel to return.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Ever since Palestinian misery in Gaza and the West Bank erupted in rioting, the world has had advice for Israel. Only last week, the Security Council, backed by the Reagan administration, told Israel to desist from plans to deport the ringleaders. It is not clear what Israel is supposed to do with people committed to civil disorder, sometimes violently so, and who work actively to get others to join them. Prison is no deterrent. It is a finishing school for rock-throwers, where these senior radicals serve as faculty.
NEWS
July 9, 2000
Hats off to President Clinton for gambling on a last-ditch, endgame summit on the Middle East. It will start Tuesday at Camp David, where he will join Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak. To call this meeting high-stakes is a gross understatement. Israeli-Palestinian negotiations have dragged on for seven years since the Oslo peace talks, but this meeting aims to set the framework for a final agreement. That means resolving all the issues many have labeled insoluble, like the boundaries of a Palestinian state, the future of Jerusalem, and the fate of Palestinian refugees.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Jamal Halaby, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordanian authorities will strike those who incite violence during protests with an "iron fist," the country's police chief said Thursday as the Islamist-led opposition vowed to continue demonstrations that have rattled the U.S.-allied kingdom. The protests, which erupted Tuesday across Jordan in response to the government's hiking fuel and gas prices, are the largest and most sustained to hit the country since the start of uprisings in the region nearly two years ago. Gunmen taking advantage of street chaos caused by the protests fired on two police stations late Wednesday, wounding 17 people, including 13 police officers, officials said.
NEWS
April 15, 2004 | Daily News wire services
In a historic policy shift, President Bush yesterday endorsed Israel's plan to hold on to part of the West Bank in any final peace settlement with the Palestinians. Bush also ruled out Palestinian refugees' returning to Israel, bringing strong criticism from the Palestinians. Bush's ringing endorsement of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's plan was immediately interpreted across the Arab world as a deathblow to the very "road map" for peace Bush helped create and a break with decades of U.S. policy.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
Learning wrong lessons Re: "Fixing a wrong on rights," editorial, Dec. 3: It is indeed true, as the editorial states, that "we are a nation that is still learning. " We are learning: That terrorist thugs deserve official statement of crimes, access to legal counsel, speedy trials in courts of law and the benefit of criminal doubt as if they were citizens. That militant extremists who fight under no flag should be granted POW status when captured hiding their bombs.
NEWS
October 20, 1995 | By Trudy Rubin
All during this week, a car ferry filled with 659 Palestinian refugees, half of them children, was stranded off Cyprus because no country would take them in. This news item summons up memories of World War II Jewish refugee ships banned from entering Palestine. But in this case, the refugees are unwelcome in the ports of brother Arabs, as well as in Israel. If you think this news sounds peculiar, given ongoing peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians, you are right. But the story of the hapless Countess M ferry underscores one of the biggest - and least publicized - problems still blocking a full Mideast peace.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The prospects for reaching an Israeli-Palestinian deal by John Kerry's April 29 deadline are about as unlikely as Vladimir Putin's giving up Crimea. The secretary of state probably wishes he never launched his quixotic campaign for Mideast peace a year ago. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' Monday meeting with President Obama at the White House only illustrated the unbridgeable gulf between Israeli and Palestinian positions. But Kerry was right to warn in April that "if we do not succeed now, we may not get another chance.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Karin Laub, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced Monday that he is fast-tracking legislation that would allow him to put any peace deal with the Palestinians to a national referendum - an apparent attempt to silence hard-liners in his party and coalition government. Netanyahu spoke three days after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said progress has been made toward a resumption of Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, stalled for five years. Kerry has invited Israeli and Palestinian negotiators to Washington for preliminary talks, though wide gaps remain on the framework of the actual negotiations.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The White House has just announced that President Obama will visit Jerusalem in March - his first presidential trip to Israel and the first overseas visit of his second term. This trip, which will also include the West Bank and Jordan, will be crucial for Obama, whose Mideast policy is in tatters. He'll be trying to warm up his cool relations with Prime Minister Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu, and to focus on Iran and Syria. But Obama will also need to put forward new ideas for resurrecting the Israel-Palestinian peace process, a task on the order of raising Lazarus from the dead.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Jamal Halaby, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordanian authorities will strike those who incite violence during protests with an "iron fist," the country's police chief said Thursday as the Islamist-led opposition vowed to continue demonstrations that have rattled the U.S.-allied kingdom. The protests, which erupted Tuesday across Jordan in response to the government's hiking fuel and gas prices, are the largest and most sustained to hit the country since the start of uprisings in the region nearly two years ago. Gunmen taking advantage of street chaos caused by the protests fired on two police stations late Wednesday, wounding 17 people, including 13 police officers, officials said.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - The Palestinian Authority president has set off a strident debate by shattering a once-inviolable taboo, publicly suggesting his people would have to relinquish claims to ancestral homes in Israel. Mahmoud Abbas' comments on the refugee issue, made in an interview on Israeli TV over the weekend, triggered hot responses from Palestinians and Israelis alike. In Israel, it suddenly put the long-sidelined issue of peace talks back in the Israeli public's consciousness ahead of parliamentary elections.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - The Syrian regime pounded Aleppo with warplanes and artillery shelling Saturday as ground forces seeking to regain momentum in the country's largest city advanced on three neighborhoods, activists said. Shelling and air raids against the eastern Helwaniyeh neighborhood caused a large number of casualties, according to the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and another activist group called the Local Coordination Committees. Amateur videos showed wounded people bleeding on the floor of a crowded makeshift hospital as they received treatment.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Ali Abunimah
I am coming to the University of Pennsylvania this week to incite violence against the State of Israel - pro-Israel groups and commentators have contended - and, along with hundreds of students and other speakers who will attend the 2012 National Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Conference, to engage in an "act of warfare. " Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, we are coming together to push forward an inclusive movement that supports nonviolent action to promote the human rights of the Palestinian people, because only full respect for these rights can lead to peace.
NEWS
January 6, 2005
Enough about Eagles! Re: "Optimism = Super Bowl?", Jan. 4: I must be an optimist. I can actually visualize a time when this baseless drivel casting Philadelphians as pessimists will no longer be repeated ad nauseam in publications such as The Inquirer. Thoughtful people in this area (i.e., most of us) recognize that in any given year, the Eagles have only a chance to win the Super Bowl, much like other good teams around the league have a chance to win it. Not winning it does not make the Eagles "losers.
NEWS
November 12, 2004 | By Walter Reich
One doesn't speak ill of the dead - much less so if his passing plunges his people into grief. But if his actions in life denied those people the very goal he'd promised them, the one on which they'd hung their hopes and their destiny, then one has no choice but to speak, even as one acknowledges the man's remarkable achievement. And Yasir Arafat's achievement was remarkable indeed. Without him, the Palestinian refugees who fled or were expelled from their homes in 1948 might have been forgotten, like the German refugees expelled from Czechoslovakia and Poland in 1945, or the Hindu and Muslim refugees displaced at the partition of India in 1947.
NEWS
November 3, 2004 | By Gwynne Dyer
Yasir Arafat isn't dead yet. The disorder that forced him to desert his besieged headquarters in Ramallah and fly to Paris for medical treatment may not kill him, but he may never go home again, and his long reign as the undisputed leader of the Palestinian people is certainly over. So it is time to write his political obituary, if not his personal one. He should have died at least 10 years ago, of course. It would have been better for his reputation, for he never had the skills to run a proto-state like the Palestinian Authority: even as "president" of the Palestinian Authority, he remained at heart a guerrilla chieftain who ruled through cronies and relatives, co-opted his opponents with bribes of one sort or another, and never failed to appoint at least two rivals to any position of power.
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