CollectionsPalsy
IN THE NEWS

Palsy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Bruce C. Morgan, 76, of Coatesville, who retired in 1993 as the guidance director at Haddonfield Memorial High School, died of progressive supranuclear palsy, a brain disorder, on Monday, March 28, at the Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. Joseph G. Serico knew Mr. Morgan when Serico was assistant principal at Haddonfield from 1988 to 1990 and its principal from 1990 to 2002. "He was very focused on helping us keep central that children need to come first in all decision-making," Serico said.
SPORTS
July 1, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
D.A. Wei-bring rebounded from a recent bout with fatigue brought on by Bell's palsy and played nearly flawless golf from tee to green yesterday to win the Greater Hartford Open. Weibring shot a 3-under-par 67 for a 10-under 270 total that put him 4 strokes ahead of runner-up Tom Kite. His fifth title on the PGA tour was his first since he was found to have Bell's palsy earlier this year. "I had a lot of emotions going on," Weibring said. "I knew I had a chance to win today, and that was important, given what I've experienced this year.
NEWS
February 3, 1987
The propaganda from the National Rifle Association implies that the only thing preventing immediate invasion by hordes of Ostrogoths (or worse) is an armed American citizenry pointing their trusty fowling pieces out the window. But when was the last time you heard of a homeowner using his or her right to keep and bear arms in an intelligent, constructive manner? It doesn't seem to work out that way. Instead of gallant stands against bad guys, the story you generally get is tragedy.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pamela Van Dusen Carpenter, 79, of East Falls, a mother and volunteer, died Friday, Sept. 18, of complications from progressive supranuclear palsy at home. A "displaced Minnesotan," Mrs. Carpenter came to Philadelphia in 1966 with her husband, John, an Episcopal priest. The family lived for two years in Port Richmond, where he was vicar at St. George's and Holy Redeemer Parish.In 1968, the two moved to Center City so he could attend law school. He joined the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, and Mrs. Carpenter embraced Center City life with her five small children.
SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Weibring posted a small victory for himself Saturday by being the last player to make the 36-hole cut at the U.S. Open. But the bigger victory for the 33-year-old Dallas native was in just getting to Merion Golf Club. Weibring, currently playing on the Web.com Tour, has been afflicted with Bell's palsy for the last 21/2 months and hadn't played a tournament since mid-April. "Your eye, the right side of your face gets paralyzed so you can't close or blink your eye or anything," said Weibring, the son of former PGA Tour player D.A. Weibring.
SPORTS
July 1, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Before D.A. Weibring teed off in the final round of the Greater Hartford Open in Cromwell, Conn., he got some encouragement from his teenage son. "You deserve to win this, you've been through a lot," Matt Weibring told his father, who held a one-stroke lead entering yesterday's final round. Weibring held that same lead when he met up with his son again at the turn. The 16-year-old offered some advice: "Take the tournament shot-by-shot, and don't look at the scoreboard. " Weibring went on to win his fifth title - but more importantly - the first since his career was abruptly interrupted when he was diagnosed with Bell's palsy earlier this year.
SPORTS
January 27, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A student with cerebral palsy can resume playing soccer with crutches for Strath Haven High, Pennsylvania state athletic officials have ruled. Strath Haven junior Bobby Calderoni had been ruled ineligible last fall after a collision with another player. The PIAA's board of directors overrode that decision Friday. For the last two seasons, the PIAA had allowed Calderoni to play using the padded metal supports, which he is not allowed to raise above his waist. But his eligibility was revoked after a junior varsity game last fall in which the opposing goalkeeper broke a finger.
LIVING
May 26, 1995 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"Here's an apple and a duck!" Michael, 4, announced after he put the finishing touch on a wooden puzzle. He had a big grin on his face. "I did this by myself," he said. He reached for a plastic Noah's Ark, placed the animals in the top, put the roof back on and pushed it across the rug. "They're taking a trip to the zoo," he confided. "Here they go. " Michael has made wonderful progress since he was born prematurely and drug addicted. He tests as mildly mentally retarded and is functioning on a 3-year- old level.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011
TV has occasionally spotlighted physically challenged characters on fictional shows as well. Here are a few who stand out: "Tate" (1960). David McLean played a bounty hunter who's the fastest draw in the West even though he lost the use of his left arm in the Civil War. "Ironside" (1967-75). Although a sniper's bullet forced Raymond Burr's detective into a wheelchair, he still managed to roll over bad guys. "Longstreet" (1971-72). He may have been blinded by an explosion, but James Franciscus' insurance investigator could still see through criminals' flimsy stories.
NEWS
March 1, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Born in Russia with cerebral palsy in 1990, Vanya Pashtukhov was abandoned by his alcoholic mother at a bleak Moscow orphanage called Baby House 10. For the next half-dozen years, he was clothed in rags and confined to a metal crib in near-constant "bed regime. " Government doctors labeled him "ineducable" and, when he was only 6, shunted him to an adult asylum for "mental defectives. " "It was terrifying," he recalled recently. "Like a devil's den. " Pashtukhov's pitiful childhood was no singular nightmare.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Bruce C. Morgan, 76, of Coatesville, who retired in 1993 as the guidance director at Haddonfield Memorial High School, died of progressive supranuclear palsy, a brain disorder, on Monday, March 28, at the Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. Joseph G. Serico knew Mr. Morgan when Serico was assistant principal at Haddonfield from 1988 to 1990 and its principal from 1990 to 2002. "He was very focused on helping us keep central that children need to come first in all decision-making," Serico said.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pamela Van Dusen Carpenter, 79, of East Falls, a mother and volunteer, died Friday, Sept. 18, of complications from progressive supranuclear palsy at home. A "displaced Minnesotan," Mrs. Carpenter came to Philadelphia in 1966 with her husband, John, an Episcopal priest. The family lived for two years in Port Richmond, where he was vicar at St. George's and Holy Redeemer Parish.In 1968, the two moved to Center City so he could attend law school. He joined the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, and Mrs. Carpenter embraced Center City life with her five small children.
SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Weibring posted a small victory for himself Saturday by being the last player to make the 36-hole cut at the U.S. Open. But the bigger victory for the 33-year-old Dallas native was in just getting to Merion Golf Club. Weibring, currently playing on the Web.com Tour, has been afflicted with Bell's palsy for the last 21/2 months and hadn't played a tournament since mid-April. "Your eye, the right side of your face gets paralyzed so you can't close or blink your eye or anything," said Weibring, the son of former PGA Tour player D.A. Weibring.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The climb up the 72 steps that lead to the entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art began at 10 a.m. Saturday for the woman known as the Left-Thumb Blogger. Glenda Watson Hyatt, a 44-year-old writer with cerebral palsy whose autobiography is called I'll Do It Myself , didn't quite do it alone. The Rocky devotees wouldn't let her. Hyatt was surrounded by a Rocky impersonator, a newspaper executive who wrote a book about Rocky, and a band playing the Rocky theme.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
To be or not to be. Shakespeare chose simple words for the most complicated of questions, words so powerful that they have resonated for four centuries. When Heather Krause, a teaching artist with Walnut Street Theatre, saw how her students responded to those words, she had an outrageous idea: stage Hamlet with six high school-age actors with mental retardation and cerebral palsy, children so disabled that all are in wheelchairs and some cannot speak without the aid of machines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011
TV has occasionally spotlighted physically challenged characters on fictional shows as well. Here are a few who stand out: "Tate" (1960). David McLean played a bounty hunter who's the fastest draw in the West even though he lost the use of his left arm in the Civil War. "Ironside" (1967-75). Although a sniper's bullet forced Raymond Burr's detective into a wheelchair, he still managed to roll over bad guys. "Longstreet" (1971-72). He may have been blinded by an explosion, but James Franciscus' insurance investigator could still see through criminals' flimsy stories.
SPORTS
June 17, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
THE GREAT ATHLETES play relaxed. No moment is too overwhelming. The possibilities are considered and analyzed. When you watch Evan Turner next season, and every indication is that you will be watching him play for the 76ers, notice the rhythm and pace to his game. It is understated, quiet, effective and very relaxed. When you've been where Turner has been and lived what he has lived, playing basketball does not seem all that daunting. Before his fourth birthday, Turner got just about every illness imaginable.
NEWS
March 1, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Born in Russia with cerebral palsy in 1990, Vanya Pashtukhov was abandoned by his alcoholic mother at a bleak Moscow orphanage called Baby House 10. For the next half-dozen years, he was clothed in rags and confined to a metal crib in near-constant "bed regime. " Government doctors labeled him "ineducable" and, when he was only 6, shunted him to an adult asylum for "mental defectives. " "It was terrifying," he recalled recently. "Like a devil's den. " Pashtukhov's pitiful childhood was no singular nightmare.
SPORTS
January 27, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A student with cerebral palsy can resume playing soccer with crutches for Strath Haven High, Pennsylvania state athletic officials have ruled. Strath Haven junior Bobby Calderoni had been ruled ineligible last fall after a collision with another player. The PIAA's board of directors overrode that decision Friday. For the last two seasons, the PIAA had allowed Calderoni to play using the padded metal supports, which he is not allowed to raise above his waist. But his eligibility was revoked after a junior varsity game last fall in which the opposing goalkeeper broke a finger.
NEWS
July 19, 2006 | By Jeff Price and Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what investigators called a tragic accident, a 23-year-old handicapped Perkiomenville man in a wheelchair died after he was mistakenly left all day in his family's van parked at their house. The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office yesterday concluded that the man, who had cerebral palsy from birth and was in a wheelchair, died from hyperthermia, the effects of extreme heat. The man's name was not released because police considered the case "a private family matter," said Risa Ferman, Montgomery County first assistant district attorney.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|