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NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Yuri Kageyama, ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Panasonic slumped to a 30.4 billion yen ($389 million) quarterly loss, hit by lower sales after the earthquake in northeastern Japan, and announced the sale of part of its refrigerator and washing machine business to Chinese rival Haier. Panasonic Corp., which makes Viera TVs and Lumix cameras, said Thursday the deal for Haier Group to buy the Sanyo brand home appliances businesses in Japan and Southeast Asia is set to be completed by March 2012. It did not give a value for the deal.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | JONATHAN TAKIFF, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER, TAKIFFJ@PHILLYNEWS.COM, 215-854-5960
"DIDJA HEAR the news? Panasonic is getting out of the TV business," blabbed a buddy. Uhhh, not really. This half-truth started with a Reuters quote from a Panasonic executive that the Japanese electronics giant will shutter a huge plasma-TV factory next year. That is true. What nobody reported is why Panasonic is making the move: not to exit the TV business but to ease away from the profit-challenged HDTV category and speed the transition to the next wave of premium-priced "4K" Ultra High Definition TVs that deliver four times the resolution of today's high-definition sets.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
IN THE REGION N.J. bank deregisters stock Cornerstone Financial Corp., Mount Laurel, said it would deregister its stock under the JOBS Act, which President Obama signed last month. The new law boosted the threshold above which banks must register their shares with the Securities and Exchange Commission, to 1,200 shareholders from 300 shareholders. Cornerstone said it has 410 shareholders. The bank, which had deposits of $342 million on March 31, estimated cost savings from the deregistration of $150,000 to $175,000 a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2011
T HE GIZMO : Panasonic TC-P55VT30 raises the bar and lowers the price of premium grade TV. RECESSION SPENDING: TV sets are like fruit. You'll pay a lot to nab the fresh-picked first of the season. But when cartons pile up in the warehouse because consumers are watching their wallets, even top-tier set makers start cutting prices to move the merch. LIVING LARGE: The Panasonic TC-P55VT30 review unit I've been living with for three months is a perfect case in point.
FOOD
February 6, 1991 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
New videocassette recorders coming later this year from RCA, GE and Panasonic will make the task of program setting much less complicated. Thomson Consumer Electronics' RCA and GE brands will be the first to build- in the VCR Plus programming technology from Gemstar Development Corporation. VCR Plus is based on a system of codes printed in local newspapers and regional editions of TV Guide that correspond to specific TV programs. Just punch in a four or five digit code on the special remote control, and your VCR now knows the day, hour and channel to automatically record.
FOOD
February 14, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The boom box is exploding in popularity - again. Supplanted by the Walkman and other personal stereos as the teen-ager's favorite carry-along sound machine, the boom box has gone upscale and moved indoors, taking up residence as a serious second system for the bedroom, den, dorm or patio. Why, some new boxes (by Fisher/Sanyo and Yamaha) don't even offer the option of battery operation - running strictly on AC power. Along with the conventional assortment of cassette-tape and AM/FM stereo radio features, amplifier section, tone controls and speakers, today's better boxes also offer a fine-sounding, programmable compact disc player.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Now that even the most economical VCRs offer the luxury of on-screen programming, one of the biggest nuisances of setting a VCR's timer has been eliminated - no more crouching in front of the VCR to push the little buttons for entering day, time and channel information. But on-screen programming has drawbacks of its own. For starters, the TV set must be turned on to use it. For another, if it dawns on you that the timer must be set for a subsequent show while you're in the middle of viewing something, what do you do?
NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although getting permission to show the game wasn't exactly a free kick, Saturday's U.S.-England World Cup match will be telecast at the Philadelphia Union's brand-new Chester stadium as part of an open house for season ticket-holders. About a month ago, the Union applied for the OK to televise the game on the day when soccer fans would be getting their first peek inside the riverfront stadium, said Tom Veit, the Union's president. The World Cup governing body, the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Hold it right there. Get scissors. Save this column. You'll need it someday, believe me. The single most-asked video question I hear (other than "How often should I clean my VCR?") concerns playing of foreign videotapes on domestic VCRs. Every so often I restate the short answer: You can't play them. But there is a longer, more detailed, answer. You can play them back with the proper equipment. Because so many people seem to have friends and family abroad and would like to play "videograms" from them, I'll summarize the options.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Of the 10 million camcorders sold in this country, the popularity of the full-size VHS models has always perplexed the Japanese, who much prefer the mini-formats of Compact VHS and 8 millimeter. As camera fanatics and world travelers, the Japanese understand the virtues of gadgetry in miniature. So it is that the most exciting advances in consumer camcorders in recent months relate to size. Last year, Sony set a new standard in downsizing with the ultra-small TR-5, an 8mm model that weighed 1.7 pounds without battery, yet retained the most desirable convenience features.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Show-and-tell with the security cam purveyors at the Panasonic System Communications Co. in Newark, N.J., was more engaging than TV news. First they shared a startling video of a house exploding from a gas leak in Stafford Township, N.J., as captured on a local police cruiser's Panasonic dash cam. This onboard camera system is always "live-buffering" a little bit (recording the last 30-90 seconds) of video "just in case you need to save it," said Greg Peratt, vice president of Panasonic's Security Business Unit for the U.S. The system is triggered to capture a full incident when flashing lights and siren are turned on, the police car is going fast, a gun comes out of the holster, or a crash is detected.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | JONATHAN TAKIFF, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER, TAKIFFJ@PHILLYNEWS.COM, 215-854-5960
"DIDJA HEAR the news? Panasonic is getting out of the TV business," blabbed a buddy. Uhhh, not really. This half-truth started with a Reuters quote from a Panasonic executive that the Japanese electronics giant will shutter a huge plasma-TV factory next year. That is true. What nobody reported is why Panasonic is making the move: not to exit the TV business but to ease away from the profit-challenged HDTV category and speed the transition to the next wave of premium-priced "4K" Ultra High Definition TVs that deliver four times the resolution of today's high-definition sets.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
IN THE REGION N.J. bank deregisters stock Cornerstone Financial Corp., Mount Laurel, said it would deregister its stock under the JOBS Act, which President Obama signed last month. The new law boosted the threshold above which banks must register their shares with the Securities and Exchange Commission, to 1,200 shareholders from 300 shareholders. Cornerstone said it has 410 shareholders. The bank, which had deposits of $342 million on March 31, estimated cost savings from the deregistration of $150,000 to $175,000 a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2011
T HE GIZMO : Panasonic TC-P55VT30 raises the bar and lowers the price of premium grade TV. RECESSION SPENDING: TV sets are like fruit. You'll pay a lot to nab the fresh-picked first of the season. But when cartons pile up in the warehouse because consumers are watching their wallets, even top-tier set makers start cutting prices to move the merch. LIVING LARGE: The Panasonic TC-P55VT30 review unit I've been living with for three months is a perfect case in point.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Yuri Kageyama, ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Panasonic slumped to a 30.4 billion yen ($389 million) quarterly loss, hit by lower sales after the earthquake in northeastern Japan, and announced the sale of part of its refrigerator and washing machine business to Chinese rival Haier. Panasonic Corp., which makes Viera TVs and Lumix cameras, said Thursday the deal for Haier Group to buy the Sanyo brand home appliances businesses in Japan and Southeast Asia is set to be completed by March 2012. It did not give a value for the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2010
The Gizmo: Spending time with the Panasonic Viera TC-P50VT 25 - the best 50-inch 3-D (and 2-D) TV on the planet. Taking the lead: While LCD TVs have been handily outselling plasma-based models of late, the future may belong to plasma. For that we can thank the higher technical demands of 3-D stereoscopic television, which requires a set to output twice the normal number of images per second, for proper left-eye/right-eye processing by companion shutter-based 3-D glasses and your brain.
NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although getting permission to show the game wasn't exactly a free kick, Saturday's U.S.-England World Cup match will be telecast at the Philadelphia Union's brand-new Chester stadium as part of an open house for season ticket-holders. About a month ago, the Union applied for the OK to televise the game on the day when soccer fans would be getting their first peek inside the riverfront stadium, said Tom Veit, the Union's president. The World Cup governing body, the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA)
BUSINESS
January 7, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In anticipation of booming television sales from the nation's transition to digital broadcast signals, Comcast Corp. and Panasonic Corp. plan to announce today a new generation of cable-ready interactive flat-screen televisions at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The plug-and-play TVs, in 42-inch and 50-inch versions, are expected to reach retail stores later this year. Prices have yet to be disclosed. The main convenience for consumers: no need for digital set-top boxes leased from the cable company, the accompanying tangle of wires, and the extra remote.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | By Ewart Rouse, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Take 46 American engineers who don't speak Japanese, put them in a plant with six Japanese engineers who speak little English, and ask them to conduct joint research on digital, high-definition TV. No, this isn't the plot for a new sitcom. Rather, it's the makeup of the workforce and its assigned mission at the Panasonic AVC American Laboratories in Burlington Township. The result, as you might expect, is a language and cultural barrier with the potential for miscommunications, misunderstandings and conflict.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Chad Hopkins wasn't volunteering at the local home for senior citizens, counseling children at summer camp, working at his part-time job, or participating in the Air Force Junior ROTC program at Cherry Hill West, his parents always knew they could find him somewhere in their house taking apart a radio or computer. "If something was broken - or even if it wasn't - he would be sitting there taking it apart, fixing it, and then putting it back together again," said his mother, Rozz Hopkins.
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