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Pancreas

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NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first pancreas transplant ever done in the Philadelphia area was performed last week on a patient at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, but the organ had to be removed shortly after the operation because of complications. Dr. Clyde Barker, chairman of the hospital's department of surgery, said the transplanted pancreas failed after clots developed in the blood vessels that supplied the organ. "The technical procedure worked fine and the initial function of the transplant was good," said Barker, who headed the 12-member surgical team that performed the pancreas transplant.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 8-month-old boy lay in his Philadelphia hospital bed one day last week, peaceful, his grandmother dripping food into a stomach tube hanging from lines tied to the bedposts. This is how the child will have to be fed back in his own country, because no one there can service an automatic feeding pump. Yesterday, a successful 12-week sojourn to repair Zachariah Garib's pancreas and save his life ended when Zachariah returned to his village in Guyana, on the northeastern coast of South America.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Scott Snyder hopes to thank the person whose pancreas and kidney have helped him stay alive for the last decade. "This is where I'll start to lose it," he says softly, pausing to regain his composure. "I think about my donor every day. " Snyder, 61, underwent double-organ transplant surgery at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden on Jan. 28, 2005. Since then, he has welcomed two grandchildren, retired after 30 years of teaching industrial arts at Eastern Regional High School, and partially restored the 19th-century Lindenwold home where we sit down to talk.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MURAL at 68th and Wyncote avenues in West Oak Lane depicts a group of determined drug warriors gathering to fight the dealers. Look carefully and you'll see a little pigtailed girl of 7 standing with her father, looking just as determined. The little girl was Sherrill Lynn Nash, proudly marching with her father, Joseph Nash, to rid their neighborhood of the scourge of drugs. All her life, Sherrill had the grit and drive of the true fighter, not only against drugs but also in her own life, refusing to let serious physical disabilities keep her from living to the fullest.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
TAXING TIME Can the income-tax-filing process be made less painful? Yes, say the authors of the Hope Health Letter. If you're feeling frustrated, they advise, remind yourself that you survived the process last year. Divide the job into smaller tasks. Prepare a pleasant place to work, and reward yourself with a movie or dinner out when you finish a big section. Share the job with your family, or consider hiring a professional tax preparer to do part of it. Finally, just do it and get it over with . . . until next year.
NEWS
June 6, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last of eight former Philadelphia inspectors convicted of taking cash from plumbers was sentenced yesterday, escaping three years behind bars because federal prisons could not provide medical care for his recent double organ transplant. Instead, former inspector Stephen Rachuba, 41, will spend the next 12 months confined to his Castor home, allowed outside only for medical visits. "We have no desire to do anything to cause you worse health problems," U.S. District Judge Petrese B. Tucker told Rachuba.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Using a technique that could someday prove important for the treatment of human diabetes, University of Pennsylvania researchers have succeeded in curing rats of the disease by transplanting insulin-producing cells into the thymus. In a novel experiment described in today's issue of Science, Penn researchers chose a new site - the thymus gland at the base of the neck - into which to transplant islet cells. Those cells, found in the pancreas, produce the insulin needed to regulate the metabolism of sugar.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | Daily News wire services
MINEOLA, N.Y. A PLEA BARGAIN FOR BUTTAFUOCO? The possibility of a plea bargain has been raised in Joey Buttafuoco's alleged statutory rape of 16-year-old Amy Fisher, sources close to the case said yesterday. The deal was one of several issues brought up in preliminary pretrial meetings between the two sides in the highly publicized case, said the sources, who spoke only on condition of anonymity. Buttafuoco's wife, Mary Jo, said the couple has talked about accepting a plea bargain because they believe Joey could not get a fair trial.
SPORTS
June 3, 2009 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In late April, when the cancer that had invaded Bill Jackson's pancreas spread, DeSean Jackson had his father relocated from Long Beach, Calif., to Philadelphia. From peewee football through DeSean's tenure at the University of California, Bill Jackson was a staple at his son's games. However, after DeSean, a wide receiver, was drafted by the Eagles last year, the bicoastal travel prevented the elder Jackson from attending most of the games during his son's breakout rookie season.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Scott Snyder hopes to thank the person whose pancreas and kidney have helped him stay alive for the last decade. "This is where I'll start to lose it," he says softly, pausing to regain his composure. "I think about my donor every day. " Snyder, 61, underwent double-organ transplant surgery at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden on Jan. 28, 2005. Since then, he has welcomed two grandchildren, retired after 30 years of teaching industrial arts at Eastern Regional High School, and partially restored the 19th-century Lindenwold home where we sit down to talk.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MURAL at 68th and Wyncote avenues in West Oak Lane depicts a group of determined drug warriors gathering to fight the dealers. Look carefully and you'll see a little pigtailed girl of 7 standing with her father, looking just as determined. The little girl was Sherrill Lynn Nash, proudly marching with her father, Joseph Nash, to rid their neighborhood of the scourge of drugs. All her life, Sherrill had the grit and drive of the true fighter, not only against drugs but also in her own life, refusing to let serious physical disabilities keep her from living to the fullest.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-dozen medical students crowd into a lab at Jefferson Medical College as Jeffrey Joseph points to a graph of a patient's blood sugar. While healthy levels stay within a narrow range, this man's pattern is wildly erratic, peaking at four times the normal amount after a meal and plunging dangerously low during sleep. The graphs are from a diabetic named Brian who had his blood sugar, or glucose, continuously monitored over three days for a study, says Joseph, head of Jefferson's Artificial Pancreas Center.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | Meeri Kim
A company in West Chester has completed the first human clinical trials of its artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetics. Researchers from Animas Corp. presented the results at last week's American Diabetes Association Conference in Philadelphia. Thirteen diabetics unable to produce their own insulin used their artificial pancreas for about 20 hours with no adverse events.   While the technology is widely viewed as the "holy grail" for type 1 diabetics, it's still a long way off. "I wish I could give you a time frame — two years, four years, a decade," said Henry Anhalt, Animas' chief medical officer.
SPORTS
June 3, 2009 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In late April, when the cancer that had invaded Bill Jackson's pancreas spread, DeSean Jackson had his father relocated from Long Beach, Calif., to Philadelphia. From peewee football through DeSean's tenure at the University of California, Bill Jackson was a staple at his son's games. However, after DeSean, a wide receiver, was drafted by the Eagles last year, the bicoastal travel prevented the elder Jackson from attending most of the games during his son's breakout rookie season.
NEWS
June 6, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last of eight former Philadelphia inspectors convicted of taking cash from plumbers was sentenced yesterday, escaping three years behind bars because federal prisons could not provide medical care for his recent double organ transplant. Instead, former inspector Stephen Rachuba, 41, will spend the next 12 months confined to his Castor home, allowed outside only for medical visits. "We have no desire to do anything to cause you worse health problems," U.S. District Judge Petrese B. Tucker told Rachuba.
LIVING
November 20, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doug Shriver's third gift to Faith Taylor-Carlin arrived at 11:20 a.m. last Monday, eight years after the Gettysburg, Pa., man died in a car crash. At that moment, obstetrician Frank Craparo pulled 5-pound, 14-ounce Elizabeth Alexis Carlin from her mother's belly. She was bloody and almost eggplant-purple but healthy enough to unleash a robust yell. Dad Alex Carlin counted 10 fingers the size of daisy petals and 10 tiny toes and quickly established that his black-haired daughter looked normal.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 8-month-old boy lay in his Philadelphia hospital bed one day last week, peaceful, his grandmother dripping food into a stomach tube hanging from lines tied to the bedposts. This is how the child will have to be fed back in his own country, because no one there can service an automatic feeding pump. Yesterday, a successful 12-week sojourn to repair Zachariah Garib's pancreas and save his life ended when Zachariah returned to his village in Guyana, on the northeastern coast of South America.
NEWS
July 26, 1999 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Glancing at Charlotte, a 250-pound Swedish pot-bellied pig, "Hammlet" mused: "To kiss or not to kiss, that is the question. " It wasn't quite Shakespeare. But Hammlet, a.k.a. Dr. Bruce Stark, wasn't dressed in a black suit, frilly collar and pig snout to pay homage to the Bard. He was out to promote diabetes awareness. "This is to educate the public that diabetes is a dangerous disease," Stark said at Brandywine Picnic Park at yesterday's start to the inaugural KISS-A-PIG fund drive.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes isn't just about avoiding sugar. It's about needles, pricks and constant monitoring. It's about the long-term effects of extremely high blood-sugar levels: vision problems, kidney disease and amputations. And it's about avoiding extremely low blood-sugar levels that could lead to comas. "It's very difficult, even when they try their hardest, to control their blood glucose," said Jeffrey Joseph, assistant professor of anesthesiology at Jefferson Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University.
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