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Pancreatic Cancer

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2011 | By Dan Gross
M ARIA SHRIVER didn't indicate anything was amiss in her marriage to Arnold Schwarzenegger when she thanked East Falls' Harry Jay Katz , an old friend, for sending the couple a bottle of vinegar that his wife, Debra Renee Cruz , made for their 25th anniversary on April 26. Katz, who befriended Shriver in the 1970s when she worked for KYW-TV, attended the couple's wedding in Hyannis, Mass. "Thanks for thinking of us and sending wishes on our special day," Shriver wrote in a letter.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a report that could have worldwide implications, the Rohm & Haas Co. said yesterday that a study of employees at its Bridesburg plant showed for the first time that there might be a link between workers' exposure to the insecticide DDT and pancreatic cancer. The study is the first to link DDT to cancer in people, officials at the Environmental Protection Agency said. If additional studies show that DDT causes cancer it could lead to worldwide restrictions on the use and manufacture of the insecticide, said Albert Heier, an EPA spokesman.
SPORTS
October 31, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Colgate basketball coach Jack Bruen said yesterday that he plans to stay involved with his team even though doctors tell him he has pancreatic cancer. "I've been to every practice and don't intend to miss any," Bruen said. "If treatment dictates something different later, we will deal with the situation at that time. " Bruen, 48, is beginning his ninth season with the Red Raiders and has led the team to a 106-124 record. During his tenure, Colgate has won a share of three Patriot League regular-season titles, won two Patriot League tournaments and appeared twice in the NCAA tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four University of Pennsylvania researchers have been awarded $2.4 million in grants to study pancreatic cancer. They were among $5 million in grants announced Wednesday by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the American Association for Cancer Research. The money came from PCAN. Both groups were involved in choosing the grant recipients. Only 6 percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are alive after five years. PCAN's goal is to double the survival rate by 2020.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes in science, what you get wrong can be just as important as what you get right. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania set out two years ago to prove that a new drug could marshal T cells, key players in the immune system, against pancreatic cancer. That didn't happen. Instead, the experimental antibody turned more primitive immune-system cells that often get co-opted into helping pancreatic cancer tumors against part of the tumor structure. Tumors shrank substantially in some patients, and median survival time lengthened by two months, to 7.4 months.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just seven years from now, pancreatic cancer is projected to become this country's second-leading cancer killer, surpassed only by lung cancer and claiming 48,000 lives a year - nearly the population of Harrisburg. Now No. 4, pancreas cancer will climb in the ranking partly by becoming more common, but mostly because it is ferociously difficult to detect and treat, according to an analysis by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. "The dramatic increase in the anticipated number of deaths . . . is a wake-up call to the research and health-care systems in the United States," senior author Lynn M. Matrisian, a molecular biologist, wrote last month in the journal Cancer Research.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Pancreatic cancer is notoriously lethal - there are almost as many deaths from it each year as there are new cases. The deaths in recent days of Apple cofounder Steve Jobs and Nobelist Ralph Steinman bring unusual attention to this less well-known type of cancer that has been declining despite no big advances in care or finding it early. A decline in smoking, one of the top risk factors for the disease, may be behind the drop in cases. Jobs lived more than seven years after being diagnosed with a neuroendocrine tumor - a less common, slower-growing, and more treatable type of pancreatic cancer than the kind that killed Steinman a week ago and actor Patrick Swayze two years ago. The Apple chief kept details of his illness behind a fire wall and declared he was cured after cancer surgery in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Charles Yeo could hardly have been mistaken for a preacher, not with the white lab coat. But as the surgeon mingled among the crowd in a ground floor auditorium at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, one could see why he referred to the mid-November gathering as "almost a religious experience. " It was the fifth annual Pancreatic Cancer symposium, a chance for survivors and those recently diagnosed to learn about the latest advances and - not least - to give each other moral support.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard L. Siegel, 73, of Northeast Philadelphia, a criminal lawyer and educator, died Tuesday, Jan. 17, of pancreatic cancer at Manor Care in Huntingdon Valley. After establishing a law practice in Center City in 1986, Mr. Siegel represented clients charged with robbery, rape, homicide, corruption, and embezzlement and was involved in several high-profile cases. In 1997, he was the attorney for Herbert Haak in the "Center City jogger" murder trial. On Nov. 2, 1995, Kimberly Ernest, 26, was found fatally beaten in a stairwell at 21st and Pine Streets.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
I WOULD PERSONALLY like to thank Dr. Randy Pausch, who recently passed away, for all of his dedicated work in promoting awareness of pancreatic cancer and the lack of adequate funding from the federal government. Pancreatic cancer is an insidious disease with no known cause, no known cure and little money devoted to research. It claims almost as many American lives as breast cancer each year, twice as many as AIDS and has the poorest five-year survival rate of any cancer, at only 5 percent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Researchers who study hereditary breast and ovarian cancer call it "the Angelina Jolie Effect. " They reported a sustained global surge in requests for BRCA genetic testing after the actress wrote about her preventive mastectomy two years ago. Last month, she gave another boost to awareness when she wrote about her recent surgery to remove her ovaries. But raising awareness hasn't necessarily lowered barriers, BRCA experts say. People seeking to identify and manage their inherited cancer risk often confront conflicting, confusing medical guidelines, test options, and insurance coverage.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The measure of a man may be found in the memories of others. Memories of David R. Boldt are of a dedicated journalist who believed in presenting bold ideas to the public. As The Inquirer's editorial page editor from 1988 to 1998, and prior to that as the editor of Inquirer Magazine, Boldt made that pursuit not just his mission, but his passion. Boldt, 73, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his home in Pasadena, Calif. He leaves behind a host of former colleagues who remember him as a talented, creative, humorous, and courageous newspaperman.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore J. DeConna, 87, of Cherry Hill, chair of obstetrics and gynecology at the former West Jersey Hospital in Voorhees, died Wednesday, Feb. 18, at home of pancreatic cancer. Born in Pittsburgh, Dr. DeConna graduated from Hahnemann Medical School in 1956. He served his internship at West Jersey and his residency at Philadelphia General Hospital. Dr. DeConna set up his private practice in Cherry Hill in 1960, at the same time he joined what was then called the Department of Women at West Jersey, said Joseph Gillerlain, a retired colorectal surgeon and a friend of Dr. DeConna's for 63 years.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen T. Johnson Sr., 63, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired deputy commissioner who served the city's Police Department for more than three decades, died Thursday, Jan. 1, of pancreatic cancer at a hospice in Valley Forge. In 1977, Mr. Johnson followed his father, James A. Johnson, onto the force. He mimicked his father by later serving on the prestigious Highway Patrol as well as patrolling in Kensington and South and West Philadelphia. A competitive man, he climbed the ranks, becoming a sergeant in the 12th District in Southwest Philadelphia and then a lieutenant assigned to the 25th District.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
From the time they were teenagers, triplets Adam, Brian, and Jonathon knew the envelope was always there on the desk. "Everything you need to know is in there," their father, owner of Joseph Levine & Sons Funeral Home, would tell them before he left for a trip. "If I don't come back, you'll know what to do. " "We all understood that our father needed to do that because that's the kind of man he is. Totally responsible, totally committed, not just to his business, but to us," said Brian.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Move over, ice bucket challenge. Borrowing the basics of the numbingly shared social-media fad, physicians and staff at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital on Tuesday volunteered to be showered with tennis balls to benefit pancreatic cancer research. The "Bucket of Tennis Balls Challenge" honored Joe Strub of West Chester, an avid tennis player and information-systems technician who lost his battle with the disease four years ago at age 62. While the oft-publicized ice bucket challenge calls awareness to Lou Gehrig's disease and has raised more than $110 million to aid research in just a couple of months, Tuesday's event hopes to call similar attention to a disease that claims the lives of 33,000 Americans per year, according to Dr. Jonathan Brody.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you needed surgery for pancreatic cancer, you probably wouldn't give a thought to what kind of saline solution your surgical team would use. After all, pancreatic cancer is bad news, and the procedure used to excise it, called a Whipple (or the tongue-twisting pancreaticoduodenectomy), is long, dangerous, and technically challenging. But researchers at Thomas Jefferson University say the saline in your IV drip matters. They were able to reduce the complication rate by 25 percent by using saltier saline and using less of it. Their work was published in Annals of Surgery.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vicki Wolf was only 36 when she was first diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. After her third diagnosis 11 years later, the native Philadelphian had a genetic test that revealed what she dreaded and expected: She had inherited a mutation in a gene that made her susceptible to the disease. She urged her brother, Harvey I. Singer, to get genetic testing and counseling, but he shrugged off the idea. "I said, 'I'm a guy.' To me, breast cancer was just something women get," Singer recalled.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just seven years from now, pancreatic cancer is projected to become this country's second-leading cancer killer, surpassed only by lung cancer and claiming 48,000 lives a year - nearly the population of Harrisburg. Now No. 4, pancreas cancer will climb in the ranking partly by becoming more common, but mostly because it is ferociously difficult to detect and treat, according to an analysis by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. "The dramatic increase in the anticipated number of deaths . . . is a wake-up call to the research and health-care systems in the United States," senior author Lynn M. Matrisian, a molecular biologist, wrote last month in the journal Cancer Research.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeremy J. Fischer, 52, of Kimberton, who publicized his two-year battle with pancreatic cancer to help raise research funds and gracefully modeled how patients can live with cancer, died Sunday, Oct. 27, of the disease at his home. Mr. Fischer spoke on the air last year as part of the Stand Up to Cancer campaign supporting researchers here and across the country whose focus is hard-to-treat cancers. Before the report, Mr. Fischer's weight had dropped to 119 pounds, but he described his illness to CBS3 reporter Stephanie Stahl as "like a crouching tiger in a room.
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