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Pancreatic Cancer

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2011 | By Dan Gross
M ARIA SHRIVER didn't indicate anything was amiss in her marriage to Arnold Schwarzenegger when she thanked East Falls' Harry Jay Katz , an old friend, for sending the couple a bottle of vinegar that his wife, Debra Renee Cruz , made for their 25th anniversary on April 26. Katz, who befriended Shriver in the 1970s when she worked for KYW-TV, attended the couple's wedding in Hyannis, Mass. "Thanks for thinking of us and sending wishes on our special day," Shriver wrote in a letter.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a report that could have worldwide implications, the Rohm & Haas Co. said yesterday that a study of employees at its Bridesburg plant showed for the first time that there might be a link between workers' exposure to the insecticide DDT and pancreatic cancer. The study is the first to link DDT to cancer in people, officials at the Environmental Protection Agency said. If additional studies show that DDT causes cancer it could lead to worldwide restrictions on the use and manufacture of the insecticide, said Albert Heier, an EPA spokesman.
SPORTS
October 31, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Colgate basketball coach Jack Bruen said yesterday that he plans to stay involved with his team even though doctors tell him he has pancreatic cancer. "I've been to every practice and don't intend to miss any," Bruen said. "If treatment dictates something different later, we will deal with the situation at that time. " Bruen, 48, is beginning his ninth season with the Red Raiders and has led the team to a 106-124 record. During his tenure, Colgate has won a share of three Patriot League regular-season titles, won two Patriot League tournaments and appeared twice in the NCAA tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four University of Pennsylvania researchers have been awarded $2.4 million in grants to study pancreatic cancer. They were among $5 million in grants announced Wednesday by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the American Association for Cancer Research. The money came from PCAN. Both groups were involved in choosing the grant recipients. Only 6 percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are alive after five years. PCAN's goal is to double the survival rate by 2020.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes in science, what you get wrong can be just as important as what you get right. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania set out two years ago to prove that a new drug could marshal T cells, key players in the immune system, against pancreatic cancer. That didn't happen. Instead, the experimental antibody turned more primitive immune-system cells that often get co-opted into helping pancreatic cancer tumors against part of the tumor structure. Tumors shrank substantially in some patients, and median survival time lengthened by two months, to 7.4 months.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just seven years from now, pancreatic cancer is projected to become this country's second-leading cancer killer, surpassed only by lung cancer and claiming 48,000 lives a year - nearly the population of Harrisburg. Now No. 4, pancreas cancer will climb in the ranking partly by becoming more common, but mostly because it is ferociously difficult to detect and treat, according to an analysis by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. "The dramatic increase in the anticipated number of deaths . . . is a wake-up call to the research and health-care systems in the United States," senior author Lynn M. Matrisian, a molecular biologist, wrote last month in the journal Cancer Research.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Pancreatic cancer is notoriously lethal - there are almost as many deaths from it each year as there are new cases. The deaths in recent days of Apple cofounder Steve Jobs and Nobelist Ralph Steinman bring unusual attention to this less well-known type of cancer that has been declining despite no big advances in care or finding it early. A decline in smoking, one of the top risk factors for the disease, may be behind the drop in cases. Jobs lived more than seven years after being diagnosed with a neuroendocrine tumor - a less common, slower-growing, and more treatable type of pancreatic cancer than the kind that killed Steinman a week ago and actor Patrick Swayze two years ago. The Apple chief kept details of his illness behind a fire wall and declared he was cured after cancer surgery in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Charles Yeo could hardly have been mistaken for a preacher, not with the white lab coat. But as the surgeon mingled among the crowd in a ground floor auditorium at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, one could see why he referred to the mid-November gathering as "almost a religious experience. " It was the fifth annual Pancreatic Cancer symposium, a chance for survivors and those recently diagnosed to learn about the latest advances and - not least - to give each other moral support.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Before he died early last year of pancreatic cancer, Stephen T. Johnson filed a lawsuit against Merck for not telling him his disease might be a side effect of taking Januvia, the company's blockbuster diabetes drug. The 63-year-old Philadelphia police officer knew his life was at an end, but he wanted the product labeling changed to warn other diabetics. "He worked his whole life. He didn't need the money," said his son, Stephen T. Johnson Jr., also a Philadelphia police officer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Suzanne Wright, 69, a cofounder of the advocacy group Autism Speaks, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at her home in Fairfield, Conn., an organization spokeswoman said. She helped build the group into one of the leading voices for people with the developmental disorder. She and her husband, former NBC Universal CEO Bob Wright, founded Autism Speaks in 2005 after their grandson's diagnosis. The New York-based organization funds research, raises awareness, and spotlights the needs of people with autism and their families.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, Staff Writer
Hello there Back home in the city after a day of teaching honors English at Abington Senior High School, Julie walked to Devil's Alley to meet friends and watch the Flyers. Arriving first, she sat at the bar. "This handsome, confident man in a suit sidled up to me. " That was Charlie, president of the M.B. Funding Inc. commercial finance firm, also there to watch the Flyers and also earlier than his pals. There was Julie, attractive and sitting by herself. "I was not expecting anything more than a five-minute pleasant conversation, but five minutes led to an hour.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Delphine Olsommer Kipp, 100, of Mount Holly, who grew up poor on a northern Pennsylvania farm, died of pancreatic cancer on Tuesday, April 26, at the Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice in Mount Holly. The cancer was diagnosed less a week before her death, said a daughter, Doris Alaimo. Elisabeth Olsommer, Mrs. Kipp's mother, died of cancer at 36, when Mrs. Kipp was 9 years old, Alaimo said, "and she thought she would die young too. " For her longevity, Mrs. Kipp spoke of early years of "hard work," a lifelong diet free of processed foods, and, Alaimo said, "she did drink milk every day. " So at her mother's death, Mrs. Kipp became the woman of the house, on the family's crop farm in Greentown, Pike County.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | Staff Report
Funeral arrangements have been completed for former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams. A viewing is scheduled for 8 to 11 a.m. May 7 at Zion Baptist Church, 3600 N. Broad St., to be followed immediately by the funeral service. Interment will follow at Chelten Hills Cemetery, 1701 E. Washington Lane. Williams rose up through the ranks to become Philadelphia's first black police commissioner in 1988. He remained in the job for four years before leaving for Los Angeles in 1992 to become that police department's first black top chief.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
For so long, when telling people why he has dedicated his career to the Broad Street Run, Jim Marino would tell his father's story. How it was his father's battle with colon cancer, a disease that would eventually take his life, that motivated him to first volunteer on race day 32 years ago - the event benefitted the American Cancer Society, and he saw it as his way to help. How he went on to become the race's director, transformed it into a nationally recognized running event, and still gets the most satisfaction out of the money and awareness the run raises for cancer research.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Francis House opened at St. Anthony of Padua Church in Camden in 1996, only one of its expected guests showed up. But during its peak years, 2005 to 2012, 60 people who were infected with HIV and AIDS, or their friends and family, would show up for meals and fellowship three days a week in the Francis House portion of the former parish convent. Susan Piliro was its director for 19 years, and, she said in a phone interview, "for 18 of those years Donna stood right beside me. " Donna Lindsay Civa was the volunteer partner in the two-woman team, Piliro said, because "she wanted to be around these people and make them happy.
NEWS
February 26, 2016
ISSUE | MEDICINE Merck backs Januvia Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, and patients should not stop taking any medicine without speaking to a doctor ("Raising alarms," Sunday). The Food and Drug Administration stated in February 2014 that assertions that incretin-based medicines, including Merck & Co.'s Januvia, cause pancreatic cancer were inconsistent with available data. The FDA also said it would continue to monitor the issue. At Merck, we continue to assess the safety of our medicines, including Januvia.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Before he died early last year of pancreatic cancer, Stephen T. Johnson filed a lawsuit against Merck for not telling him his disease might be a side effect of taking Januvia, the company's blockbuster diabetes drug. The 63-year-old Philadelphia police officer knew his life was at an end, but he wanted the product labeling changed to warn other diabetics. "He worked his whole life. He didn't need the money," said his son, Stephen T. Johnson Jr., also a Philadelphia police officer.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
Murray Weissman, 90, a veteran Hollywood publicist who worked on Oscar campaigns for such films as Dances with Wolves and Shakespeare in Love , died Monday of pancreatic cancer at his Los Angeles home. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Mr. Weissman worked as a publicist for ABC and CBS. He moved to movies in the mid-1960s and oversaw Universal's release of Jaws in 1973. He began specializing in awards campaigns in the 1990s, representing dozens of best picture Oscar contenders along with hit shows such as Breaking Bad and Mad Men . An active member of the film and television academies, Mr. Weissman was feted by many clients and friends feted last month after they learned of his cancer diagnosis.
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