CollectionsPandora
IN THE NEWS

Pandora

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
May 30, 2002 | By Joe Santoliquito INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Todd Minikus looked as if he had just run a few laps around the track last night after the Class 278 Open Jumper Hit-and-Hurry event at the 106th annual Devon Horse Show. The 39-year-old rider from Palm Beach, Fla., was soaking wet after riding Pandora to her second open-jumper victory in three days. Riding the temperamental 9-year-old Westphalian was a grueling workout for Minikus on a muggy evening. "Pandora is a physical ride in the fact that you have to counteract to her reactions," Minikus said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
'Hello, boys," Lara Croft coos dryly, emerging wet-suited from the Mediterranean to board a boat and whip her boa constrictor-sized hair extension around to the delight of admiring Greek sailors. And hello boys it is, as Angelina Jolie - she of the bee-stung lips and deep-dish orbs - dons and doffs various fetching outfits, spins her twin automatics around like a lethal high school twirler, and mutters aloof Britishisms at friend and foe alike. Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life, sequel to 2001's spin-off of the best-selling computer game starring that ace archaeologist adventuress, is lad-mag action sprung to life.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After out-patient plastic surgery on her body and further work to repair a separated left shoulder and cracked finger, Pandora has been readmitted to Lankenau Hospital. "She's been buffed from head to toe," said Richard H. Wells, director of public relations for the hospital. "All new light bulbs have been inserted into her organs. " The talking transparent female figure, who for years helped hundreds of thousands of children and adults learn about the human body, has come home to a new pedestal in the hospital's education center.
SPORTS
May 28, 2002 | By Joe Santoliquito INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Knowing the temperament of a horse is as important to a rider as knowing the tendencies that horse has when jumping. Todd Minikus has what could be called a love-hate relationship with his 9-year-old mare Pandora, a big, powerful jumper that specializes in speed events. Minikus said Pandora is not the most lovable horse in the barn, but she wins. Pandora took the Class 274 open jumper category last night at the 106th annual Devon Horse Show Pandora attacked the jumps, winning in 1 minute, 8.44 seconds and easily outdistancing the second-place Shopan, ridden by Holly Shepard.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Carolyn Nicander Mohr, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
If listening to music helps put you in the holiday spirit, here's good news: Options for listening to holiday tunes abound with tech. No longer do you have to depend on hearing your favorite holiday CD repeatedly. You can enjoy free holiday music from a wide variety of sources.   Pandora Pandora is an Internet radio service that plays holiday tunes on a personal station, based on your individual preferences, or a group station, based on your favorite music style.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2010 | By GEOFF BOUCHER, Los Angeles Times
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - Apparently, there's no such thing as a quiet little corner of the world when your name is James Cameron. "Welcome to the wind tunnel," the 56-year-old filmmaker said as a Santa Monica sea breeze gusted through the French doors of his beachside hotel room on a recent afternoon. A hard-backed "Avatar" poster flew off a tripod stand in the corner and the filmmaker chuckled. "Look at that, Neytiri just leaps at you the moment you walk in the room. " Surprise attacks and second winds are fitting imagery these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
In the 2000s, the ability to download individual songs and shuffle them in iPod remade listening habits and musical tastes. This decade, all signs are that the music industry will try to move away from selling music that consumers own and store on their own devices, including iPods, iPads, and other MP3 players. Instead, this may be the decade of the cloud. Music files would be stored on remote servers that listeners could access whenever they wished, either by paying a fee or by listening to periodic commercials.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It took Virginia Ewing less than an hour to explain the birth process to a group of seventh graders. But she had help. Using three-dimensional models of fetal development on lighted, movable panels, Ewing described what happens during each month of pregnancy. "The models helped the students see more clearly what they already talked about in their classroom," Ewing said. "This is different than using a textbook; it's almost a live demonstration. " The seventh graders from Our Lady of Lourdes School at 63d Street and Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia were among the first students to visit the Lankenau Hospital Health Education Center, one of 10 hospital-based centers in the United States.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the classic version of the Greek myth, Pandora opens a box and unleashes all the evils of the world. In the skits performed by students at Saturday's regional Odyssey of the Mind creative problem-solving competition, those evils received a revamp. In one: disease, sorrow, and confusion. In another: science class, cheerleaders, and lunch ladies. In a third: homework, cooties, and a dentist - who was defeated with a 4-foot toothbrush made of multicolored, pipe-cleaner bristles. "It's amazing how smart kids are when they're not bound by reality," said Beth Sanborn, as she watched from the auditorium of Bucks County's Pennsbury High School and waited for her son's team from Montgomery Elementary School to take the stage.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the presentation of The Fall of Icarus, Robert Smythe, artistic director of the West Chester-based Mum Puppettheater, intends to bring the art of puppetry to adults. He has created a show based on several Greek myths - two of which do more than merely suggest sexuality - and has booked it into the Annenberg Center's Studio Theater for five days in the hope of attracting grown-ups to a theatrical form generally regarded as children's fare. Smythe is no doubt correct in his belief that puppets can be for adults.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Turn and face the strange. Defy the status quo. And market, market, market yourself all the way to death's door. David Bowie did all that, constantly laughing at convention, and (sometimes) all the way to the bank. A great influence in music and fashion, he carried equal weight as a financial innovator. He was an art and business project forever in flux. Ziggy had a zig for every zag. In the early 1970s, he answered social consciousness with androgyny. Later, when it was hip to diss disco, he embraced it. Even rock bastions like WMMR, WIOQ, and WYSP were forced to play "Young Americans.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Marlton jeweler Angelo Breaux got his first taste of the business half a century ago in South Philly. His grandfather Angelo Calapristi, who owned a jewelry store at 22d and Snyder, would bring Breaux along while collecting payments on credit accounts in the neighborhood. "We went door-to-door, and when people didn't have the $10 or whatever it was, they'd pinch my cheeks and feed me," Breaux, 57, recalls. "They'd give me pizzelles and biscotti, and candy. " Now a grandfather himself, Breaux is the patriarch of Family & Co. Jewelers on Route 70, where his son and two daughters work side-by-side with him in the business they all were born into.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the classic version of the Greek myth, Pandora opens a box and unleashes all the evils of the world. In the skits performed by students at Saturday's regional Odyssey of the Mind creative problem-solving competition, those evils received a revamp. In one: disease, sorrow, and confusion. In another: science class, cheerleaders, and lunch ladies. In a third: homework, cooties, and a dentist - who was defeated with a 4-foot toothbrush made of multicolored, pipe-cleaner bristles. "It's amazing how smart kids are when they're not bound by reality," said Beth Sanborn, as she watched from the auditorium of Bucks County's Pennsbury High School and waited for her son's team from Montgomery Elementary School to take the stage.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Predicting what customers might want - especially if they've never bought it before - is an essential goal of any business. But it often seems more art than science. Can Big Data finally shift that balance? That's the theory behind two start-ups, whose founders both say the Northeast is a great place to build a Big Data business, but who address the challenge from opposite directions. Working for marketers, Newtown's Enterra Solutions says it can dive into data on consumers' choices, likes, and dislikes.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Carolyn Nicander Mohr, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
If listening to music helps put you in the holiday spirit, here's good news: Options for listening to holiday tunes abound with tech. No longer do you have to depend on hearing your favorite holiday CD repeatedly. You can enjoy free holiday music from a wide variety of sources.   Pandora Pandora is an Internet radio service that plays holiday tunes on a personal station, based on your individual preferences, or a group station, based on your favorite music style.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Even if just for a few hours, it was nice to be in a darkened room surrounded by people trying to tackle problems bigger than Europe's sovereign-debt soap opera. We're talking reducing energy use, speeding up water-quality testing, and closing the funding gap for promising college students. No economists or policymakers took the stage with prescriptions for debt swaps or austerity measures at the Investors' Circle Fall Venture Fair at World Cafe Live in West Philadelphia on Thursday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
In the 2000s, the ability to download individual songs and shuffle them in iPod remade listening habits and musical tastes. This decade, all signs are that the music industry will try to move away from selling music that consumers own and store on their own devices, including iPods, iPads, and other MP3 players. Instead, this may be the decade of the cloud. Music files would be stored on remote servers that listeners could access whenever they wished, either by paying a fee or by listening to periodic commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2010 | By GEOFF BOUCHER, Los Angeles Times
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - Apparently, there's no such thing as a quiet little corner of the world when your name is James Cameron. "Welcome to the wind tunnel," the 56-year-old filmmaker said as a Santa Monica sea breeze gusted through the French doors of his beachside hotel room on a recent afternoon. A hard-backed "Avatar" poster flew off a tripod stand in the corner and the filmmaker chuckled. "Look at that, Neytiri just leaps at you the moment you walk in the room. " Surprise attacks and second winds are fitting imagery these days.
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
WHEN A TREE falls in a forest, and James Cameron is there to direct, it definitely makes a sound. An earsplitting sound. Of course, in "Avatar," the tree is 500 feet high and felled by missiles launched from a flock of attack helicopters, and it's a sacred tree whose roots are connected to the souls of the forest's indigenous peoples, whose cries of pain are entwined with the noise of the bombs and shattering wood. So some noise is to be expected. But the OTHER sound you hear in "Avatar," the sound heard round the cinema world, is that the brave new 3D, computer-generated world that Hollywood tech-heads have been promising is finally here.
SPORTS
June 4, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ramone Moore remembered the first time he heard the two magic words. "I was a junior and I was just starting to think about college, but I didn't take school too seriously," the Southern High senior said. "So someone said, 'How about prep school?' " For Moore, and scores of top-notch athletes who fail to meet NCAA academic requirements, prep school is no longer the magical option that helps pull qualifying grades out of a hat. Early last month, the NCAA took its most significant step to curtail the abuses of some prep schools by drastically limiting the number of core courses a student can take to improve his or her academic transcripts after high school.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|