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Panic Attacks

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NEWS
May 11, 2002 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A former member of two local volunteer rescue squads was sentenced yesterday to 15 years in state prison for setting the squad buildings ablaze last November. James T. Shue, 23, of Pennsauken, caused $178,000 in damage when he set fire to the Maple Shade Heavy Rescue Squad building Nov. 7. The second floor was gutted. Ten days later, he torched a car inside the Palmyra Rescue Squad building; repairs to the vehicle and to the building cost more than $53,000. "I am sorry . . . I need help," a trembling Shue said as he was sentenced by state Superior Court Judge Thomas S. Smith Jr. in Burlington County.
NEWS
March 6, 2002 | By Thom Guarnieri INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former member of two local rescue squads pleaded guilty yesterday in Superior Court to setting a series of fires last fall, fires that his attorney said he could not prevent himself from starting. In entering his pleas, James T. Shue, 23, told the court that he suffered "panic attacks" that caused him to set the fires. The blazes in November damaged buildings housing the Maple Shade Heavy Rescue Squad and the Palmyra Ambulance Association. Shue, of Pennsauken, was a member of both associations.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from American Demographics magazine, the Fort Lauderdale News and Sun-Sentinel, and Inquirer wire services
CHOLESTEROL REMOVER Someday you may be able to vacuum out excess cholesterol. A machine that does just that is designed for people who can't lower their cholesterol levels by drugs or dieting. It is being tested to obtain U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. The machine removes, cleans and returns a person's blood, minus the cholesterol. MOISTURIZING As temperatures drop and thermostats and heating systems click on, that all-over humidity bath that our skin enjoys during the summer evaporates.
LIVING
November 2, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret began to tremble. Her heart was pounding madly. She broke out in a sweat and began to breathe heavily. "Maybe this time," she thought. "Maybe this time it will kill me. " But it didn't. She lived through this panic attack, but it left her with the realization that she had to do something. She couldn't continue to hide in her "safety zones," to lie to her friends about why she needed them to drive her places, to limit what she could achieve in her career. "I had been suffering panic attacks for two years," she said, "as often as twice a day. Panic, and avoiding panic attacks, were the dominating factors of my life.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Fixer: Susan Sabo, 46, Organizers Inc., West Chester, www.organizersinc.com The problem: Although Joffe never neglected her clients, her success with them had outstripped her ability to handle routine business functions, such as billing. She lost notes scribbled on scraps of paper. Her disorganization interfered with her enjoyment of her family. The solution: Sabo advised Joffe to review her schedule for the next day at night and to make better use of technology, such as invoicing software and computerized faxing for contacting the media.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine being too afraid to open your front door and step outside. You choose, instead, to stay safely inside your own four walls for months, even years. This mental disorder, called agoraphobia, gets a credible portrayal amidst the Hollywood terror and gore of the current No. 3 box office draw, "Copycat. " Actress Sigourney Weaver plays criminal psychologist Helen Hudson, who has been too terrified to leave her apartment after being nearly slashed to death 13 months earlier by a serial killer.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Maryland sure has a funny way of showing respect for the North Carolina tradition. Obinna Ekezie, saddled with foul trouble the first half, rebounded with 19 points over the final 17:41 as the visiting Terrapins, ranked fifth, defeated No. 9 North Carolina, 89-76, last night, winning at the Smith Center for the third time in the last four years. The Terps' five wins there are more than any school. "We just came in here with a good attitude," Maryland's Laron Profit said. "We love this arena, we love the excitement, we love looking at the banners, we love thinking about the history and the tradition that this place has. "We want to put on a good show when we come here, because we feel like that's being respectful for what they've done for the game of basketball.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By L. G. Karoly, Special to The Inquirer
It was hot outside, with the temperature breaking 100 degrees for the second day in a row. Several softball games were in session Monday night and the Klein Branch of the Jewish Community Centers, at Red Lion and Jameson Roads, was bustling inside and out. But down a quiet hallway, in Room 205, a group of 20 people were there to hear about fears and phobias. Steven R. Cohen, 43, a friendly looking, tall and slender man with graying hair and a full beard, looked remarkably cool in a suit and tie. He has been treating people with phobias for the last 20 years.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | By Gwynne Dyer
Even 10 years ago, we all still lived in thrall to the Big Ideas of three 19th-century European thinkers: Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud and Charles Darwin. Today, two of the three are in semi-disgrace, but Darwin's idea is more powerful than ever. You might call it "the survival of the fittest. " It's remarkable how fast the three Big Ideas took over. In 1897, when writer Jack London, then 23 years old, was trapped in the ice on the Yukon River during the Klondike Gold Rush, he had Darwin's Origin of Species and Marx's Das Kapital in his pack to help him through the winter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fate hasn't exactly been kind to Percival Wills (Leon Cain) or Steven Ray (Steve Mouzakis), two lost souls mired in despair who meet and befriend each other in The Suicide Theory , a razor-dark buddy dramedy from Australian director Dru Brown. Percival lost his will to live three years earlier when his lover, Chris, was savagely murdered. His depression and feelings of worthlessness reach an all-time nadir when he comes to learn from hard experience that he's such a failure, he can't even kill himself properly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015
QUINCEANERAS are a big deal. Participants wear Cinderella gowns and tiaras, and often participate in a Catholic Mass during which they are presented with Bibles, jewelry and other symbols of adulthood. As a preteen, Amber Andujar of Camden looked forward to this Hispanic coming-of-age ceremony with a sweet naivete. But that was before tragedy struck and her innocence was snatched away during a brutal home invasion. It happened on her birthday back on Sept. 2, 2012. Amber, then 12, and her three siblings were home alone when a knife-wielding intruder broke into their home on Ware Street and sexually assaulted her at knifepoint.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The phone was ringing off the hook when the H&R Block office in the shopping center at 23d Street and Oregon Avenue in South Philadelphia opened Monday - tax day - and the last-minute filers began streaming in, waving their paperwork and hoping the pros could make things as painless as possible. Denise Evans, a bus driver clutching her pay stubs and Form 1040-A, said she had tried to avoid paying extra. "I thought I could do this on my own this year," she said. "I looked it up on YouTube.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Hagan backs gay marriage RALEIGH, N.C. - North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan said Wednesday that she backed marriage rights for same-sex couples, joining a growing number of Democratic Party politicians ahead of her reelection race next year. "After much thought and prayer," Hagan said on her official Facebook account, "I have come to my own personal conclusion that we shouldn't tell people who they can love or who they can marry. " Hagan last year opposed a state constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage, saying it could make it more difficult for companies to recruit talent.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A WOMAN WHO had been banned from an Upper Darby dollar store doused store employees with pepper spray as they tried to escort her out on Monday, and when they tackled her to the ground, she gave the spray can to her 7-year-old daughter and told her to finish the fight, police said. " 'You know what to do, baby. Spray it!' " Delaina Garling allegedly told her daughter. The alleged actions of this early contender for mother of the year follow on the heels of another woman who was arrested in Upper Darby last week for allegedly forcing her daughter to fight another girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
New Jersey authorities announced today that a temporary ban on so-called synthetic marijuana has been made permanent, placing the designer drug in the same legal category as cocaine and heroin. In February, the state Division of Consumer Affairs initially banned the drug - marketed as herbal incense under the brand names K2, Spice, and Kush, among others - for a 270-day period pending public input. Until then it was sold in the Garden State at convenience stores, gas stations, and shops selling smoking paraphernalia.
SPORTS
November 18, 2012 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
He could feel it coming, that familiar rolling thunder of the kettle drums in his chest, his windpipe constricting even as he tried frantically to suck in oxygen, his arms going numb like a wet finger in a light socket, his legs turning to jelly - and slowly he gave in to gravity and began to sink to his knees, and on the way down he thought: "So this is what it is like to die. " But not then. Not now. Not yet. No, golfer Charlie Beljan's time here had not expired. What the 28-year-old feared to be a heart attack during a tournament turned out to be a panic attack, which mimics a heart attack but is seldom fatal, though no less terrifying.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Religion - not intellectual theological debate, but old-time, fundamentalist, burn-in-hell, get-down-on-your-knees evangelical preachifying - is a tricky topic for a play. Especially a play written by a fundamentalist Christian from Idaho that won an Obie in New York. You keep asking yourself, is this for real? Does this play mean it? How seriously are we supposed to take these characters? How much does patronizing pity - for people who work in big-box stores for minimum wage, live in their cars, and have little in their lives to sustain them - color this show?
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer
A SPRING GARDEN MAN savagely beaten last summer by a bunch of teenagers has sued three of them for damages - and their mothers - for negligence. Timothy McCoy, 37, had just gotten off a bus and was walking to the movies when a group of about six to eight teens attacked him without provocation as he walked south on 4th Street near Walnut about 2 p.m. on July 29, 2011, according to the lawsuit filed this month in Common Pleas Court. The teens punched him in the face and kicked him repeatedly, attorney Jonathan Cohen said.
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