CollectionsPantheon
IN THE NEWS

Pantheon

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
There comes a turning point in some actors' careers (if they're lucky) that signals the emergence of a major talent. Cary Grant came of age with "The Awful Truth"; Rock Hudson proved he was more than just beefcake in "Giant"; Julia Roberts? "Erin Brockovich. " With his superb performance last year in "About a Boy" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $26.99), new this week to video, we can add Hugh Grant's name to the list. The actor - he of the cutesy stammer and seductive grin - gives a gimmick-free performance to create a sympathetic though truthful portrait of a wayward, self-centered ne'er-do-well who quite unexpectedly finds his direction in life.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172 VATICAN CITY - Hours after arriving in Rome, the local delegation did a photo op outside the Pantheon for Philadelphia journalists who made the trip. Reacting to the herd of camera crews following Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett, confused Italians and tourists crowded around and asked one another who the celebrities were. Ever the politician, Nutter dived right in, greeting strangers as if they were potential voters at a campaign stop in Philly. He ended up finding a couple from Gettysburg and posted a selfie with them on Twitter. For their first meal in Rome, the group dined at Ristorante Di Rienzo near the Pantheon. They had a traditional three-course Italian meal: antipasto, a pasta dish and a fish entree. Nutter sat with Archbishop Charles Chaput, accounting executive Bob Ciaruffoli and insurance mogul-turned-philanthropist James Maguire. Nutter and his chief of staff, Everett Gillison, left lunch early. Nutter returned to the hotel with a cannoli. City Councilman Jim Kenney, who is not on the Rome trip, is launching a social-media campaign to encourage Pope Francis to come to Philadelphia. His plan is to popularize a #PhillyLovesFrancis hashtag on Twitter and to produce videos and slide shows of local residents explaining why they like the pope. Kenney, a Catholic and a St. Joseph's Prep graduate, said in a statement that a papal visit would be "an opportunity to build on and expand the city's diversity, tolerance for others and hope for the future."
VATICAN CITY — Hours after arriving in Rome, the local delegation did a photo op outside the Pantheon for Philadelphia journalists who made the trip. Reacting to the herd of camera crews following Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett, confused Italians and tourists crowded around and asked one another who the celebrities were. Ever the politician, Nutter dived right in, greeting strangers as if they were potential voters at a campaign stop in Philly. He ended up finding a couple from Gettysburg and posted a selfie with them on Twitter.
NEWS
February 12, 2006 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There?s nothing quite as thrilling for a critic as opening the door to the four-bell penthouse and welcoming a new member of the restaurant elite. This is especially true for Striped Bass. That grand institution endured my nitpicking for years, bankruptcy and jail for its creator, and new ownership that installed some gaudy chandeliers, but also promoted the talented young chef who finally escorted the big fish to the top. Of course, there isn?t much room in that club. And it?s inevitable that its members should evolve to reflect the highest levels of Philadelphia dining, those few standard-bearers where memorable meals glide lyrically from the first sip to the final bite.
NEWS
September 6, 2006 | Bill Lyon
Bill Lyon was an Inquirer sports columnist for 34 years At the plate, he paws at the dirt, takes root like an oak and, holding the bat like Thor's hammer, points it, one-handed, out toward some distant dot on the horizon, where soon he will mash yet another home run. In Philadelphia, where we gleefully eat our own, a new hero is on the ascent. Ryan James Howard is his name, and swatting pitched balls jaw-dropping distances is his game. He has elevated himself right up there on the town's marquee alongside Allen Iverson, the Little Big Man, and Donovan McNabb, to whom is entrusted the care and feeding of the city's hottest passion.
FOOD
October 29, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
The heavy doors swing open and an honor guard of top hats and royal blue tails showers us with greetings: "Good evening! . . . Good evening! . . . Good evening! . . . Welcome to the Ritz-Carlton!" No pleasantries, though, can really prepare me for those first few steps into the rotunda. I get the sensation of soaring as I look up into the dome, where, 140 feet above, an oculus window hovers like a spyglass into the evening's fading light. The glow of polished white marble columns inside grows even more intense, illuminating the lushly upholstered furniture, the glittering crystal chandelier, the palms and chiseled classic busts that circle the city's most spectacular new space.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By John Higgins, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia is working very hard to transform itself into a destination city, a place where tourists will come and stay for a few days - something more than a three-hour stop between Washington and New York. With the opening of the new Convention Center, that has never been more likely. There is general agreement that Philadelphia's attraction for tourists is "history. " So it's not surprising that attention is being focused on finding ways to make our extraordinary historical resources more accessible.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
TRAVELING BACK IN TIME TO BLAST 13TH-CENTURY GRIME The three portals of Paris' Notre Dame Cathedral are about to get a state- of-the-art face lift using the latest laser technology. The cleaning, scheduled to begin Friday, is the first major restoration of Notre Dame's main doors since the mid-19th century. Experts said the laser beams would dislodge particles of dirt built up since the 13th century without damaging the vestiges of color still visible in the sculpted folds of the saints' clothes.
NEWS
January 25, 2002
ON THIS, the day before the weekend of the big game, we come together to give thanks to a football team that has grown close to our hearts. You know who we're talking about. Has a finer team of athletes ever graced a ballfield than these giants of the gridiron? Have you ever seen such courage in the face of overwhelming odds? Indeed, as our former governor works to keep our homeland secure, we know that the team from his state will be inspired to "Win One for the Ridger. " Sunday's contest is so much more than a game: It's Life.
NEWS
September 30, 2009 | By MARK ALAN HUGHES
MY FAMILY went to Rome this summer, and we spotted the scene in the photo above in front of the Pantheon, which captures the theme of my new Daily News column. Don't panic. Paying tribute to some important building is the opposite of what this column is going to be about. The Pantheon was built by the Romans 1,900 years ago as a pagan temple and converted into a church in 609 AD. For 13 centuries, its famous dome, 142 feet across, was the largest in the world, only surpassed in 1436 by the Duomo in Florence.
SPORTS
October 29, 2006 | By Don Steinberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Multiple listing service Seven things to know about The Great Book of Philadelphia Sports Lists, by Glen Macnow and Big Daddy Graham, which is out Nov. 1 ($14.95, Running Press): 1. Contains less filler than you expect. There's more than 270 pages and some serious research in here. 2. Awesome idea collecting lists from local, non-media people - including John Chaney, the late Eric Gregg, Bill Bergey, and J. Russell Peltz. 3. Ed Snider's "Greatest and Worst Flyers Games Ever" already needs an update.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172 VATICAN CITY - Hours after arriving in Rome, the local delegation did a photo op outside the Pantheon for Philadelphia journalists who made the trip. Reacting to the herd of camera crews following Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett, confused Italians and tourists crowded around and asked one another who the celebrities were. Ever the politician, Nutter dived right in, greeting strangers as if they were potential voters at a campaign stop in Philly. He ended up finding a couple from Gettysburg and posted a selfie with them on Twitter. For their first meal in Rome, the group dined at Ristorante Di Rienzo near the Pantheon. They had a traditional three-course Italian meal: antipasto, a pasta dish and a fish entree. Nutter sat with Archbishop Charles Chaput, accounting executive Bob Ciaruffoli and insurance mogul-turned-philanthropist James Maguire. Nutter and his chief of staff, Everett Gillison, left lunch early. Nutter returned to the hotel with a cannoli. City Councilman Jim Kenney, who is not on the Rome trip, is launching a social-media campaign to encourage Pope Francis to come to Philadelphia. His plan is to popularize a #PhillyLovesFrancis hashtag on Twitter and to produce videos and slide shows of local residents explaining why they like the pope. Kenney, a Catholic and a St. Joseph's Prep graduate, said in a statement that a papal visit would be "an opportunity to build on and expand the city's diversity, tolerance for others and hope for the future."
VATICAN CITY — Hours after arriving in Rome, the local delegation did a photo op outside the Pantheon for Philadelphia journalists who made the trip. Reacting to the herd of camera crews following Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett, confused Italians and tourists crowded around and asked one another who the celebrities were. Ever the politician, Nutter dived right in, greeting strangers as if they were potential voters at a campaign stop in Philly. He ended up finding a couple from Gettysburg and posted a selfie with them on Twitter.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Some were locals who have watched for years as the memorial to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. took shape on the National Mall. Some were tourists who happened to be in Washington the day it opened. All felt honored to be a part of history as they gazed at a towering granite sculpture of the civil rights leader. Hundreds of people slowly filed through the entrance to the four-acre memorial site on a warm, sunny Monday morning in the nation's capital. Before reaching the sculpture, they passed through two pieces of granite carved to resemble the sides of a mountain.
SPORTS
May 16, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Novak Djokovic is starting to realize what an impact he's making on tennis with his recent domination of Rafael Nadal - and everyone else in the game, too. Djokovic beat the top-ranked Nadal, 6-4, 6-4, in the Italian Open final yesterday in Rome to stretch his unbeaten start this year to 37 matches. Djokovic trails only John McEnroe's 42-0 start in 1984. "It's an incredible honor to be a part of tennis history in some way and part of an elite group of players - [Roger]
NEWS
March 22, 2011
By Ron Avery It dates back to 1803, but there is an intimate and violent connection between the Libyan capital, Tripoli, and Philadelphia. Somewhere at the murky bottom of the port of Tripoli lies the remains of an American warship, the USS Philadelphia. It was built for the Navy in its namesake city at the end of the 18th century, using funds raised by Philadelphians. The graves of two naval heroes closely connected with the ship - William Bainbridge and Stephen Decatur - can be found in local graveyards less than a mile apart.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - Phil Jackson accomplished the feat while coaching the Chicago Bulls. So did former Bears boss Mike Ditka and Blackhawks coach Mike Keenan. Add current Blackhawks skipper Joel Quenneville to the list of Chicago coaches who have taken teams to back-to-back appearances in the conference finals. But the Flyers hope Quenneville doesn't do something Keenan couldn't: bring the Stanley Cup back to the Windy City for the first time since 1961. Game 1 of the best-of-seven Stanley Cup Finals will begin at 8 p.m. Saturday here at the United Center.
SPORTS
January 17, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Another season wasted. Disappointing, but predictable. If we've learned anything by watching Andy Reid and Donovan McNabb and the Eagles over the last 11 years, it's that they love to tweak the story each season but always leave the final chapter unchanged. Hurts your eyes, after a while. And so it continues to go. The Birds are in uncomfortable territory now, firmly entrenched in the muck with other teams that never quite figured out what it takes. You'll find a list of those teams below.
NEWS
September 30, 2009 | By MARK ALAN HUGHES
MY FAMILY went to Rome this summer, and we spotted the scene in the photo above in front of the Pantheon, which captures the theme of my new Daily News column. Don't panic. Paying tribute to some important building is the opposite of what this column is going to be about. The Pantheon was built by the Romans 1,900 years ago as a pagan temple and converted into a church in 609 AD. For 13 centuries, its famous dome, 142 feet across, was the largest in the world, only surpassed in 1436 by the Duomo in Florence.
SPORTS
April 7, 2009 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
C. Vivian Stringer stood as tall as she could on a stage with three greats of the NBA, but it wasn't easy, not after being introduced yesterday as one of five new inductees into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. "If you think about it too long, you're going to pass out," the former Cheyney State and current Rutgers women's basketball coach said. "It's extremely difficult. My knees are weak. " She may have lacked in height standing next to 6-foot-1 John Stockton, 7-foot David Robinson, and 6-6 Michael Jordan, but Stringer equaled her fellow inductees in accomplishments over a 38-year career in college coaching with three schools, all of which she has taken to at least one NCAA Final Four.
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You've trudged through the Louvre, ticking off the "Big Three" of the Mona Lisa, Venus de Milo and Winged Victory as if they were tokens to collect on a very crowded treasure hunt, perhaps pausing to wonder - if Nike was so victorious, what happened to her head and arms? You've dodged traffic to study the Arc de Triomphe, had your picture taken with the Eiffel Tower in the background, climbed the great hill of Montmartre to visit Sacre Coeur, and told a dozen beggars with colored pencils that you categorically did not wish to have your portrait sketched.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
John Bucci Jr. was doing his best to make the last hours count at his family's South Philadelphia luncheonette, John's Roast Pork - preparing it for several months without him. On Monday, he taught his 20-year-old niece, Bethany Messick (known as "Boo"), the secret recipe for the family's legendary Italian roast pork. John's has become the city's premier destination for cheesesteaks in recent years, but he reminded her: That garlicky fourth-generation pork is still its best sandwich.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|