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Paper Chase

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NEWS
March 20, 1996
The thump of a Philadelphia judge's gavel should have freed them that very day. But fouled-up paperwork kept dozens of petty criminals behind bars for weeks and even months afterwards. That was the Kafkaesque situation a few months back, as reported recently by Inquirer staff writer Suzanne Sataline. In the spanking-new Criminal Justice Center, a pair of overburdened clerks fell behind on filling out forms by hand - forms needed to free people eligible for parole, work-release or drug-treatment programs.
NEWS
February 17, 1987 | BY ADRIAN LEE
We're up to page 10 of the "new revised" questionnaire for getting a gun permit. And we're stopped by questions 18 and 20. The first wants to know whether you're an "alcoholic," and the second whether you're just a plain everyday "drunk. " There's a difference? If you're the former, the questionnaire wants to know what you drink. The inference seems to be that if it's $18.11-a-fifth Chivas Regal, you need a gun - you've got money to protect. The questionnaire expresses no such curiosity about what your tipple is if you're just another rummie.
REAL_ESTATE
September 13, 2009 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
Clark Linderman of Swarthmore, a self-employed contractor, has had a home-equity line of credit from Chase for nearly four years, about as long as he and his wife have owned their house. "It's proven to be a valuable financial tool for us," Linderman says. Although they have run up what he calls a "decent balance," a lot of untapped equity remains. The original intent was to finance adoption of their youngest son. Because Linderman is self-employed, however, the credit line has been a safety net in lean times.
NEWS
January 9, 2007 | By Barbara Stavetski
I recently attended my high school reunion. They had sent out a questionnaire and one of the questions was, "What was your greatest accomplishment in the last five years. " People put stuff like "ran a marathon" and "climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. " Kid stuff. I did something much harder than that very recently: I got my New Jersey driver's license renewed. I had heard rumors about the state Motor Vehicle Commission's tough, new six-point system - requiring various documents in three categories, each worth a certain number of points that had to total six. I read the brochure carefully and was sure I had the requisite points.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | By TOM COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Look, up there in the sky over Belmont Plateau in Fairmount Park! It's a bird! It's a plane! And it's Superman! Yep, all three of them - and dozens of other shapes and forms, animal, human and geometric - all in the air at once. That will be the scene tomorrow from noon to 4 p.m. as hundreds of kiteflyers - young, old and in-between - get to show off their skills and their aircraft. Yes, a kite is an aircraft - "aircraft restrained by a towline and deriving its lift from the aerodynamic action of the wind flowing across it," says the Columbia Encyclopedia.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, there is something constructive that Philadelphians can do with all that junk mail: Bundle it, put it out by the curb, and let the city make some money off it. Starting today, the city is adding mixed paper to the cans, bottles, newspapers and other items in its recycling program. Got any old phone books, catalogs, magazines, office papers? Alfred Dezzi, the city's recycling coordinator, wants them all. He even wants such things as cereal and cookie boxes (with the liners removed)
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1979, an obscure subsidiary of the General Electric Co. in King of Prussia submitted the winning bid for building a new computer system, one that could be housed in a tractor-trailer and monitor supplies for Army field commanders. The contract was a major turning point for GE's Management & Technical Services Co., known as Matsco. It was Matsco's first manufactured product. The company had been created in 1972 as a vehicle to provide GE "service contract" employees to the government for maintenance of defense and military equipment.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
Step right up, choose what you like. For once, there's good stuff from a lot of sources. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS DYNASTY (7 p.m., Ch. 61) - Part 1 of 2. The two-hour episode that introduced the Carrington clan starts this series of syndicated reruns. In these early episodes, Bo Hopkins played Linda Evans' "other man" but disappeared quickly. Pamela Sue Martin, as Fallon, was the token Nasty Lady, going so far as to take the bride figurine from the wedding cake of Blake (John Forsythe)
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Feinman, the con man who created million-dollar empires out of phony financial paper, wanted to make one thing perfectly clear in Camden County Superior Court yesterday. "I'm a smart enough criminal to know not to sign my own name," he told Superior Court Judge Mary Ellen Talbott. "If I was going to cheat or fraud, I wouldn't go for pennies, your honor. " And compared with his past, when the Blackwood, N.J., man sold $46 million in phony surety bonds to construction contractors in New Jersey, the $4,500 he stole by writing bad checks was, indeed, pennies.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 2016
  Rock, paper, scissors. Amazon always seems to win. Is there any sector that the Internet juggernaut isn't taking down? Its latest target is office supplies. Essentially, if you sell paper products, or anything that uses paper - say, notebooks or books - you're facing challenging times. No wonder that Staples, Office Depot, and Barnes & Noble are all "streamlining" operations and closing hundreds of stores. As it awaits a federal judge's ruling on its proposed merger with Office Depot, Staples just announced it was downsizing nationwide, with store closures, reduced hours, and layoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
As principal at John Wister Elementary School in East Germantown, Donna Smith is used to stretching scant resources. But this year is different. "Bare necessities are difficult," she said. "During the 13 years I've been here, it's never been as bad as it is right now. My entire budget for basic supplies is a little over $3,000 for the school year. " That's less than $7 per student, making things like copy paper unaffordable luxuries. As Philadelphia public schools reopened last week in the face of an $81 million deficit and the prospect of 1,000 layoffs if a cigarette-tax hike isn't approved, supplying paper was the least of Smith's worries - which include deep cuts to crucial supportive teaching staff.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
It's been a good week for Aileene Halligan. The social studies teacher at Kensington Urban Education Academy just got funding for five cases of paper, enough to last her school through the end of the academic year. Sounds like no big deal, right? It's actually a major deal. Ask any teacher, especially any Philadelphia School District teacher, how much they have to spend out of their own pockets to keep their kids in paper and notebooks and other supplies, and the answer is usually in the hundreds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010
By Allegra Goodman Dial Press. 394 pp. $26 Reviewed by Jeffrey Ann Goudie Allegra Goodman's enchanting and sensuous new novel operates in pairs and opposites. Two sisters, one of them with two suitors. Two worlds, separate, even as they coalesce. In The Cookbook Collector , Goodman has written a romance that dissects ambition with a jeweler's precision and a culinary novel with a collection of rare cookbooks at its core. She also has produced a novel of ideas peopled by full-blooded characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2010 | By JEFFREY ANN GOUDIE, McClatchy Newspapers
Allegra Goodman's enchanting and sensuous new novel, "The Cookbook Collector" (Dial Press, $26), operates in pairs and opposites. Two sisters, one of them with two suitors. Two worlds, separate, even as they coalesce. Goodman has written a romance that dissects ambition with a jeweler's precision as well as a culinary novel with a collection of rare cookbooks at its core. She also has produced a novel of ideas peopled by full-blooded characters. This taxonomy of dot-com ambition is a narrative about the turning of the wheel of fortune, the one that the ancients and medievals believed in, not the one co-opted by television.
REAL_ESTATE
September 13, 2009 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
Clark Linderman of Swarthmore, a self-employed contractor, has had a home-equity line of credit from Chase for nearly four years, about as long as he and his wife have owned their house. "It's proven to be a valuable financial tool for us," Linderman says. Although they have run up what he calls a "decent balance," a lot of untapped equity remains. The original intent was to finance adoption of their youngest son. Because Linderman is self-employed, however, the credit line has been a safety net in lean times.
NEWS
January 9, 2007 | By Barbara Stavetski
I recently attended my high school reunion. They had sent out a questionnaire and one of the questions was, "What was your greatest accomplishment in the last five years. " People put stuff like "ran a marathon" and "climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. " Kid stuff. I did something much harder than that very recently: I got my New Jersey driver's license renewed. I had heard rumors about the state Motor Vehicle Commission's tough, new six-point system - requiring various documents in three categories, each worth a certain number of points that had to total six. I read the brochure carefully and was sure I had the requisite points.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five would-be owners of The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News have until 5 p.m. today to deliver signed bids for the newspapers. A sixth potential buyer, MediaNews Group Inc., of Denver, is standing by a bid it submitted last month, according to people familiar with the company's plans. Seller the McClatchy Co. says it will announce the new owner once it picks a buyer and cuts a deal, probably later this month. The sale is likely to return Philadelphia's major dailies to private control after 35 years as part of publicly traded Knight Ridder Inc. and its predecessor, Knight Newspapers Inc. Knight Ridder went on the auction block last fall under pressure from shareholders disappointed by the chain's failure to boost profits.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
Maybe you had to be on line at 10 p.m. in a Philadelphia polling place last election day. Then you'd grasp the lunacy of a federal mandate for ATM-style printouts of every citizen's vote. Anything that would have delayed or further complicated voting that day - when Philadelphians already faced hour-long waits due to a lengthy list of candidates and ballot questions - would have made voters boo louder than fans at the Linc. Yet that's just what mandating paper printouts would mean.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
In perhaps one of the strangest big-city press events in recent history, Mayor Street gathered members of his numerous transition committees together yesterday afternoon for a brief ceremony to mark the delivery of their reports. However, the details of the reports were not announced. What was announced is that the reports have been turned in, or at least most of them. The ceremony lacked pomp, circumstance or substance. The documents - ranging from thick bound reports to a few sheets stapled together - were pulled from a box and piled on a side table like homework turned in to a teacher.
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