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February 21, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The paper mill on flood-prone Flat Rock Road in Manayunk, one of the oldest industrial sites in Philadelphia, has changed owners at least half a dozen times since the 1970s. It's facing yet another reorganization. Current owner Sun Capital Partners Inc. , the Florida-based buyout firm coheaded by Marc Leder , one of the new owners of the Philadelphia 76ers , in 2008 made Manayunk its corporate headquarters for a reorganized group of paperboard and packaging plants called Paperworks Industries Inc. Boss Thomas Garland said last year he expected the company would keep growing, under Sun's ownership and with financing from PNC Bank , for three to five years at least.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 24-acre plot of land that flanks the Crum Creek and was once the site of a paper mill will be bought by Delaware County today and merged into Smedley Park. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, which acquired the site in the mid-1980s for the construction of the Blue Route, is selling it for $100,000, County Councilman John J. McFadden said yesterday. The council is expected to approve the transaction at its meeting today. Much of the land will be used for new county baseball, field hockey, soccer and lacrosse fields, with the balance left as open space, McFadden said.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A union leader for workers of the Simpson Paper Co. said yesterday that his organization would attempt to raise $12 million to pay the company to keep the paper mill open for at least another year. A company manager also said yesterday that the facility, scheduled to close Aug. 18, had had four prospective buyers and expected to see more later this week. Both developments could lead to saving some or all of the 272 jobs planned for termination by the paper mill in August, said Al Johnson, plant liaison to United Papermakers International Union Local 769. The union, which represents employees of the text and cover paper facility near the Schuylkill, wants to save workers' jobs by raising the millions that Simpson plans to save by the closing, Johnson said.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
River Road runs from Conshohocken to Roxborough along the northern side of the Schuylkill, with wooded hillside on one side and the river on the other. It's a secluded area dotted by trailers and old wooden homes. Certainly an out-of-the-way location for a manufacturing plant. Yet at the point where Trout Run Creek empties into the Schuylkill is a site where paper has been manufactured from 1746 to the present. "The first paper mill in America was erected by William Rittenhouse in 1690 on Monoshone Creek in Roxborough," said Nick Myers, historian with the Roxborough-Manayunk-Wissahickon Historical Society.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Among the region's most enduring murder mysteries is the 1881 slaying of Samuel Clugston, 49, manager of a paper mill on what is now Valley Creek Road in the village of Valley Forge. According to a report by Edward Hocker in the files of the Historical Society of Montgomery County, early on the morning of March 18, 1881, Clugston and his wife were asleep in the second-floor bedroom of their home, opposite the paper mill. Their nine children, scattered throughout the house, were also asleep.
NEWS
May 24, 2016
ISSUE | HISTORIC RITTENHOUSETOWN The cradle of the paper-making industry Linda Loyd's article "Pulp trade boosts port jobs" (Monday) recounted the dynamic growth of the Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond because of increased importation of wood pulp destined for regional paper companies. While the terminal may be a 21st-century success story, Philadelphia has been at the center of the paper-making industry since 1690, when the Rittenhouse family emigrated from Holland and built the first paper mill in British North America on the banks of the Paper Mill Run near Germantown.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | Mary Anne Janco, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Two fires at a former paper mill near Smedley Park in Nether Providence have raised concerns about security at the site purchased by PennDot as right- of-way for the Blue Route. Two men and two boys were charged with arson in connection with a fire in one of the storage buildings Feb. 24. On Jan. 14, a fire gutted part of the former mill building, causing it to partially collapse. Firefighters had concerns about the potential of hazardous materials being stored in the former paper mill building, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kind friend, when thy old shift is rent Let it to th' paper mill be sent - Judge John Holmes, 1696 God wrote on stone tablets. Cavemen wrote on walls. Later, humans wrote on animal skins. Eons passed. And always the search continued for something better on which to scribble. Then, sometime after the 14th century, people in Europe began pondering their growing piles of worn-out linen underwear. Was it possible to take the underwear - a recent health craze - and make it into paper?
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first paper mill in America when William Rittenhouse opened its doors in 1690. A small village of 40 sturdy stone houses sprang up around the mill, and business boomed. Today, six houses and a restored barn in the 200 block of Lincoln Drive are all that is left of the once-thriving mill section of Germantown. But the Friends of Historic RittenhouseTown, a volunteer community group established in 1984 to restore and preserve the site, hopes to turn back the clock - and give visitors a chance to see how early settlers manufactured paper.
NEWS
May 19, 1986 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield Board of Commissioners has decided to oppose a proposal to expand a nursing home that will be heard before the township zoning board tonight. The commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday against a request by Fairview Nursing Home to add a third floor and a small three-story addition to its facility at 850 Paper Mill Rd., Wyndmoor. The vote does not kill the plan, since the township zoning board has authority over such matters. "It's an intensive use in a residential neighborhood," Commissioner Richard E. Buck said after the meeting.
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NEWS
May 24, 2016
ISSUE | HISTORIC RITTENHOUSETOWN The cradle of the paper-making industry Linda Loyd's article "Pulp trade boosts port jobs" (Monday) recounted the dynamic growth of the Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond because of increased importation of wood pulp destined for regional paper companies. While the terminal may be a 21st-century success story, Philadelphia has been at the center of the paper-making industry since 1690, when the Rittenhouse family emigrated from Holland and built the first paper mill in British North America on the banks of the Paper Mill Run near Germantown.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The paper mill on flood-prone Flat Rock Road in Manayunk, one of the oldest industrial sites in Philadelphia, has changed owners at least half a dozen times since the 1970s. It's facing yet another reorganization. Current owner Sun Capital Partners Inc. , the Florida-based buyout firm coheaded by Marc Leder , one of the new owners of the Philadelphia 76ers , in 2008 made Manayunk its corporate headquarters for a reorganized group of paperboard and packaging plants called Paperworks Industries Inc. Boss Thomas Garland said last year he expected the company would keep growing, under Sun's ownership and with financing from PNC Bank , for three to five years at least.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
Jonathan V. Last is a senior writer for the Weekly Standard I've been spending a lot of time with Fred Rogers lately. Mr. Rogers passed away in 2003, but he lives on in an endless series of repeats on PBS stations across America. In life, he was celebrated as a secular saint and a national treasure. But now that he's gone it's clear he was more than that. For all of his sweetness, Mr. Rogers was a countercultural figure. His show, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood , presented a liberal view of the world that often verged on self-parody.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2006 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Developers of several major residential projects breathed sighs of relief as floodwaters subsided yesterday. "It wasn't as bad as we feared," said Dennis Maloomian, whose 12-story apartment building on 23d Street on the Schuylkill is nearing completion. Water left a mess in the parking area. On Manayunk's Venice Island, where Venice Lofts condominiums are scheduled to accept residents in the fall, developer Carl Dranoff declared that his buildings "passed a very good test.
NEWS
May 24, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We were an upstart. Philadelphia already had six daily newspapers on June 1, 1829, when John Norvell, the former editor of one of them, teamed with a young printer named John R. Walker to roll out the first edition of the Pennsylvania Inquirer. What Norvell supposedly told Walker as he scanned the very first Page One was this: "In a free state, there should always be an inquirer asking on behalf of the people: 'Why was this done? Why is that necessary work not done? Why is that man put forward?
NEWS
August 14, 2005 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Just ask Barbara Solem-Stull about those places that aren't there anymore. She can tell you about whole Pine Barrens towns that have disappeared. It began several years ago, when the Shamong resident noticed the ruins while hiking and kayaking through the Pinelands, as the barrens are now called, with her husband, Gordon Stull. She became intrigued with the towns that once sported names such as Harrisville, Martha, Herman and Friendship. They were part of the life cycle that existed in the Pine Barrens largely in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
NEWS
July 26, 2005 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From his Boy Scout days, Bill Minahan remembers hauling piles of old newspapers to sell - for pennies a load - at the steam-belching paper mill on Lancaster Avenue in the center of Downingtown. The 19th-century mill was Downingtown's oldest, but it closed almost four years ago, and Minahan, 46, of Lionville, now a project manager for Carroll Contractors Inc., wondered what would become of the shabby complex of stone walls and makeshift sheds along the Brandywine Creek. Now he knows.
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Andrew Hicks is banking that his Mill Town Square, between Pennsylvania and Lancaster Avenues, will become a trendy destination in this old mill town turned suburban enclave. His company, Tripoint Properties Inc., has sunk $11 million into the borough's largest retail site. "I bought it with the idea of totally revitalizing it," said Hicks, 37. "It's what you would call an extreme makeover. " Hicks said he liked projects that require creativity. And the idea of producing a Main Street-type center appealed to him. "We felt that Downingtown, with its historic background and the nearby parks, would make a great location for this.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Scannapieco thinks he's found an underserved niche that will keep him busy for a decade or so: building very big condos for very rich people who are weary of sprawling estates with lots of people repairing things under foot. The veteran developer of residential and commercial projects says his first upper-upscale condo project, at the southern edge of New Hope in Bucks County, is well on its way to success. He's ready to buy sites for others. If you've got an estate you'd like to sell - and don't want to see it carved up into a subdivision - he'd like to hear from you. He wants to buy sites, particularly on the Main Line and around Princeton.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | By Gary M. Galles
Our children have returned to school, armed with the Internet skills for academic research. But they also have the savvy to avoid research by purchasing term papers on the Web. Term-paper sellers have been around for years, with catalogs describing thousands of available papers and custom research offerings. They advertise in many university newspapers, as well as in magazines such as Rolling Stone. But until recently, their reach was often limited to local students who could easily access them.
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