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Paper Or Plastic

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FOOD
June 26, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Whenever I take a cake with icing to a dinner or party, I cover it with waxed paper or plastic wrap. To keep the icing from sticking to the paper or plastic, I spray the wrap with a non-stick cooking spray. The wrapping can then be removed without destroying the icing. - Mr. S.W. Dear Polly: You can turn greeting cards into wonderful bookmarks just by cutting them into strips with pinking shears. Clear plastic shower caps make great inexpensive bowl covers for the refrigerator.
NEWS
January 26, 2008
Perhaps the most common symbol of the global throwaway culture is the plastic bag. About 500 billion to 1 trillion get used, and rarely re-used, each year. In many towns and cities the plastic bag has become the de facto national flag, waving from trees and lampposts, festooning highways, blighting the landscape. The things are everywhere. But that is starting to change. China - where the central government can still do such things - has banned the sale or free distribution of ultra-thin plastic bags as of June.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the final, tense moments of the Narberth supermarket robbery last month, there was some confusion about whether the two masked men waving assault rifles preferred paper or plastic. An Acme store clerk who showed up for a hearing yesterday for one of the accused told reporters outside the court that a paper shopping bag full of money ripped open as the gunmen were leaving the store. Some of the loot spilled out, the 17-year-old clerk said, and the gunmen were asked, "Paper or plastic?"
NEWS
February 26, 2002
We used to have it simple - a number for the phone, Social Security and license plate. We survived on one species of M&Ms and two choices about toilet paper, rolling off the top or the bottom depending on maternal tradition. But now, what phone company for local service? What company for long distance? DSL? Unlisted? Messaging? Forwarding? Call waiting? Line insurance? . . . "Your password expires in four days. Do you want to change it?" Aging minds must choose - numbers, letters, capitals?
FOOD
January 22, 2009
Worth the trip We've all heard the reasons for including almonds in our diets, and these terrific nuts from Trader Joe's make that easy to do. Dry roasted to a perfect crunch, with a light sprinkling of salt (60 milligrams per 1/4 cup), these are among the best almonds I've tasted - in fact, they are the reason for stopping in every couple of weeks, to stock up. At the ready How many times have you been caught at the checkout line without your reusable grocery bags? Stick one of these foldable totes in your pocketbook or coat pocket and you'll have at least one when the checker asks, "Paper or plastic?"
FOOD
May 23, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Do you have any recipes for drain cleaners that are safe to use? - Betty Dear Betty: Here's a simple, old-fashioned formula that will keep drains free-running and sweet smelling. It's safe for all types of plumbing. Mix together 1 cup of baking soda, 1 cup of salt and 1/4 cup cream of tartar. Store this in a tightly covered container. To use as a drain cleaner, pour 1/4 cup of the cleaning mixture into the drain, add 1 cup boiling water, wait a few minutes, then flush thoroughly with cold water.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Paper or plastic? New Jersey lawmakers could answer that typical checkout question for consumers under a bill that aims to curb plastic-bag use statewide. If passed, most major retailers, supermarkets, and drugstores would be prohibited from freely giving out nonbiodegradable plastic bags. Customers who insist on plastic - or paper - would pay 5 cents for every single-use bag beginning in June 2017. Proponents hope consumers, instead, will use reusable carryout bags. The bill, introduced by Assemblywoman Grace Spencer (D., Essex)
NEWS
January 29, 2008
Paper or plastic? Your editorial excoriating the use of plastic bags ("Yesterday's baggage," Jan. 26) was excellent as far as petroleum-based products are concerned. But there is another solution coming on line in Europe: biodegradable bags made from corn, which are as strong as oil-based plastic when new, but degrade completely within 18 months in landfills. I brought several home last summer to share with the Lower Merion Township Environmental Advisory Council, and we are investigating potential sources of supply in the United States.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
When you go into a supermarket, you are usually given a choice: paper or plastic bags to cart your groceries home, unless you are carrying your own reusable grocery bag. In some states, the choice could cost you a few pennies - including New Jersey, if bills pending in the Legislature become law. In what may be shaping up as a big battle in the fall legislative session, environmental groups and clean-ocean advocates are pushing lawmakers to...
NEWS
January 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bar-code scanner beeps. The groceries glide toward the bagger, not to mention a new eco-enemy: the bag itself. If it's made of plastic, all the worse. Plastic bags are handy, to be sure. They carry lunches, wet swimsuits and pet waste. Yet they last for centuries in landfills. Thrown away, they are often blown away, urban tumbleweeds that wind up draped in trees, plastered to fences, clogged in sewer drains. In the open sea, they kill turtles. So the ubiquitous "free" plastic grocery bag - that small, pale piece of processed petrol so flimsy that good baggers double up - is beginning to be targeted by lawmakers and others who want them restricted or banned.
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NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Paper or plastic? New Jersey lawmakers could answer that typical checkout question for consumers under a bill that aims to curb plastic-bag use statewide. If passed, most major retailers, supermarkets, and drugstores would be prohibited from freely giving out nonbiodegradable plastic bags. Customers who insist on plastic - or paper - would pay 5 cents for every single-use bag beginning in June 2017. Proponents hope consumers, instead, will use reusable carryout bags. The bill, introduced by Assemblywoman Grace Spencer (D., Essex)
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
When you go into a supermarket, you are usually given a choice: paper or plastic bags to cart your groceries home, unless you are carrying your own reusable grocery bag. In some states, the choice could cost you a few pennies - including New Jersey, if bills pending in the Legislature become law. In what may be shaping up as a big battle in the fall legislative session, environmental groups and clean-ocean advocates are pushing lawmakers to...
FOOD
January 22, 2009
Worth the trip We've all heard the reasons for including almonds in our diets, and these terrific nuts from Trader Joe's make that easy to do. Dry roasted to a perfect crunch, with a light sprinkling of salt (60 milligrams per 1/4 cup), these are among the best almonds I've tasted - in fact, they are the reason for stopping in every couple of weeks, to stock up. At the ready How many times have you been caught at the checkout line without your reusable grocery bags? Stick one of these foldable totes in your pocketbook or coat pocket and you'll have at least one when the checker asks, "Paper or plastic?"
NEWS
January 30, 2008
Something wicked The Democratic leaders in Washington are so ashamed of their own incompetence that they brought in Dorothy from Kansas (Gov. Kathleen Sebelius) to make their response to the State of the Union address ("Opposition sees room for cooperation," Jan. 29). Lord, drop a house on our wicked legislature. Tom Gimbel Manahawkin tomgimbel@comcast.net Class act After seeing the picture of Sen. Hillary Clinton reaching over to shake the hand of Sen. Ted Kennedy, who had just endorsed Sen. Barack Obama for president, I thought, "What a classy lady" (Inquirer, Jan. 29)
NEWS
January 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bar-code scanner beeps. The groceries glide toward the bagger, not to mention a new eco-enemy: the bag itself. If it's made of plastic, all the worse. Plastic bags are handy, to be sure. They carry lunches, wet swimsuits and pet waste. Yet they last for centuries in landfills. Thrown away, they are often blown away, urban tumbleweeds that wind up draped in trees, plastered to fences, clogged in sewer drains. In the open sea, they kill turtles. So the ubiquitous "free" plastic grocery bag - that small, pale piece of processed petrol so flimsy that good baggers double up - is beginning to be targeted by lawmakers and others who want them restricted or banned.
NEWS
January 26, 2008
Perhaps the most common symbol of the global throwaway culture is the plastic bag. About 500 billion to 1 trillion get used, and rarely re-used, each year. In many towns and cities the plastic bag has become the de facto national flag, waving from trees and lampposts, festooning highways, blighting the landscape. The things are everywhere. But that is starting to change. China - where the central government can still do such things - has banned the sale or free distribution of ultra-thin plastic bags as of June.
NEWS
February 26, 2002
We used to have it simple - a number for the phone, Social Security and license plate. We survived on one species of M&Ms and two choices about toilet paper, rolling off the top or the bottom depending on maternal tradition. But now, what phone company for local service? What company for long distance? DSL? Unlisted? Messaging? Forwarding? Call waiting? Line insurance? . . . "Your password expires in four days. Do you want to change it?" Aging minds must choose - numbers, letters, capitals?
FOOD
August 13, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
To understand the communal soul of the White House, a rambling Victorian rental on the corner of First Avenue at 32d Street in Avalon, look no further than its dinner table on a summer Saturday night. On those occasions, three or four smaller tables are pushed together to form one accommodating as many as 30 people. The dishes, glassware and cutlery - none of it paper or plastic - are charmingly mismatched. The fresh flowers are from friends' gardens. Candelabra stand ready to be lighted.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the final, tense moments of the Narberth supermarket robbery last month, there was some confusion about whether the two masked men waving assault rifles preferred paper or plastic. An Acme store clerk who showed up for a hearing yesterday for one of the accused told reporters outside the court that a paper shopping bag full of money ripped open as the gunmen were leaving the store. Some of the loot spilled out, the 17-year-old clerk said, and the gunmen were asked, "Paper or plastic?"
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