CollectionsPaper Route
IN THE NEWS

Paper Route

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | by Gloria Campisi Daily News Staff Writer
Just like always, "Mr. Floyd" got up before the sun the other day, cooked himself breakfast, and set off on his bicycle to deliver his newspapers. Floyd Culver's been getting up with the birds for most of his 93 years, and delivering the Daily News and Inquirer for the past half-century. He won't for a while. But he will be delivering his papers again, Culver vowed yesterday from his bed at Graduate Hospital, "just as soon as I can get back on my feet. " Culver "busted up" his right knee when he was hit by a car that came out of nowhere, and then fled, he said.
NEWS
January 23, 1986
A woman of "limited intelligence," acknowledged to be a "loving, caring mother," seeks only to raise the children she chose to bear in the best kind of environment she can provide. Why not utilize the myriad resources of our social agencies to aid her specifically with that task - instead of destroying her family unit? Why don't the social workers investigate the "neighborhood troublemakers" who set her son's clothing on fire and stole money he earned on a paper route? I'll bet they'll find "environmental factors" similar to those horrors at Marjorie Scott's house: "dingy athletic socks" and pizza boxes.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
By John Hearn We shopped rarely and with forethought and together. Shopping was a social ritual that followed a set procedure. After the tax refund arrived - usually in March, when cold ocean winds still swept the hills south of Boston - my mother gathered the four of us to trek uptown. Each of her three boys would get a pair of trousers, summer sneakers, and a Red Sox cap, all at least a size too big to accommodate growth. She feared outgrown clothes that could not be easily replaced.
LIVING
August 13, 1993 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
As Raymond, 12, sits at a table answering questions, he glances at a visitor coloring a tree trunk blue. With a puzzled look, he begins to say something. Thinking better of it, he draws a neat, correct tree with green and red apples, flowers and grass. Then he signs his name and hands the picture over with a pleasant smile and a gracious "you're welcome" when he's thanked. This young man is relaxed, considerate, honest and helpful. He is overcoming a struggle that began with his birth.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charlotte Schmoyer did all the right things. A ninth grader, she never missed a day of school. She reveled in twirling the flags for her high school band. She swam for the swim team. She joined in her church's youth activities. And for the last 3 1/2 weeks, she woke before dawn to deliver the local newspaper. The paper route paid nearly $50 a week, and Charlotte, 15, was saving to buy a high school jacket so she could display the varsity letter she won for band. But her immediate goal was to complete her first 30 days on the job and earn the T-shirt from the Morning Call of Allentown that said "I survived the first 30 days.
NEWS
August 28, 1996 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At first, it just seemed like an early morning fog rising off Little Mantua Creek. But as Inquirer delivery man Joseph Meenan cruised past on his route yesterday, his nose informed him that this was no morning haze, but a fire smoldering in the top floor of a Delaware Avenue home, he said. Meenan hit the brakes and put in a call to police, then backed up his 1994 Corsica, got out, and started pounding on the front door of the house. "If it wasn't for him, I wouldn't have waken up," said John Baumiller, who said he was sound asleep on the couch.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WERE lucky enough to have Robert Wilson as your paperboy, you wouldn't have missed many deliveries of the Daily News and Inquirer. That, despite the fact that Robert made his deliveries on a bicycle. There he was, pedaling through all kinds of weather - like the Postal Service, "neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night" could keep him from his appointed rounds. Robert obviously had a powerful inner drive to get the papers delivered to his South Philadelphia customers because he kept at it for more than 40 years, well into his 80s - still on his bicycle - and could no longer be called a paper boy . And he was always in a hurry.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Robert M. McGrath, 83, of Marlton, a former circulation supervisor in South Jersey for The Inquirer, died of complications from dementia Thursday, June 12, at Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice Inpatient Center in Mount Holly. A 1950 graduate of North Catholic High School in Philadelphia, Mr. McGrath served in the Army from 1952 to 1954, for a time as a heavy-vehicle driver during the Korean conflict, "trying to get supplies to the front lines," a daughter, Catherine Radley, said.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeff Sengara finally woke up and everything was backward. He had called for room service and told them he was in Room 711. They told him he was in Room 714. Groggy, he looked around. The hotel room had all the same stuff, but the bathroom was on the wrong side. So was the window. And the door. He looked out into the hallway and saw a door frame "completely gutted out of the wall," battered beyond recognition. He called his parents and said "someone moved me. " They already knew.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Timothy Carlton "Tim" Rose, an FMC employee, church and community volunteer and mentor, died Thursday of complications after a liver transplant. He was 31 and lived in West Mount Airy. Rose worked for FMC in Center City for the past 11 years and was a computer operator in the controller's department. He was also active in the Big Brothers and Big Sisters organizations, his church and various charitable fund-raising organizations. A graduate of Benjamin Franklin High School, Rose attended Kutztown University and transferred to Peirce Junior College where he received an associate degree in business.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Robert M. McGrath, 83, of Marlton, a former circulation supervisor in South Jersey for The Inquirer, died of complications from dementia Thursday, June 12, at Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice Inpatient Center in Mount Holly. A 1950 graduate of North Catholic High School in Philadelphia, Mr. McGrath served in the Army from 1952 to 1954, for a time as a heavy-vehicle driver during the Korean conflict, "trying to get supplies to the front lines," a daughter, Catherine Radley, said.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WERE lucky enough to have Robert Wilson as your paperboy, you wouldn't have missed many deliveries of the Daily News and Inquirer. That, despite the fact that Robert made his deliveries on a bicycle. There he was, pedaling through all kinds of weather - like the Postal Service, "neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night" could keep him from his appointed rounds. Robert obviously had a powerful inner drive to get the papers delivered to his South Philadelphia customers because he kept at it for more than 40 years, well into his 80s - still on his bicycle - and could no longer be called a paper boy . And he was always in a hurry.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
By John Hearn We shopped rarely and with forethought and together. Shopping was a social ritual that followed a set procedure. After the tax refund arrived - usually in March, when cold ocean winds still swept the hills south of Boston - my mother gathered the four of us to trek uptown. Each of her three boys would get a pair of trousers, summer sneakers, and a Red Sox cap, all at least a size too big to accommodate growth. She feared outgrown clothes that could not be easily replaced.
NEWS
June 17, 2001
From 1959 to 1969, my wife and I had six children, two daughters followed by four sons. In the early years, we could barely imagine seeing them get married. But time went by, and one after another, as they prepared for their weddings, three of our sons asked me to be their best man. Each time, I was thrilled and surprised. They not only had each other to ask, they also had close friends they had known for many years. As I wondered why they chose me, I searched out our pasts together.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | by Gloria Campisi Daily News Staff Writer
Just like always, "Mr. Floyd" got up before the sun the other day, cooked himself breakfast, and set off on his bicycle to deliver his newspapers. Floyd Culver's been getting up with the birds for most of his 93 years, and delivering the Daily News and Inquirer for the past half-century. He won't for a while. But he will be delivering his papers again, Culver vowed yesterday from his bed at Graduate Hospital, "just as soon as I can get back on my feet. " Culver "busted up" his right knee when he was hit by a car that came out of nowhere, and then fled, he said.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeff Sengara finally woke up and everything was backward. He had called for room service and told them he was in Room 711. They told him he was in Room 714. Groggy, he looked around. The hotel room had all the same stuff, but the bathroom was on the wrong side. So was the window. And the door. He looked out into the hallway and saw a door frame "completely gutted out of the wall," battered beyond recognition. He called his parents and said "someone moved me. " They already knew.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | By Lea Sitton Stanley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mayor calls him "Red Dog. " Some of the little guys call him "Dawg-Dawg. " The gym at McDevitt Recreation Center in East Falls, that's the Dogdome, and the camp there in the summer is Camp Dog. All this for a guy whose mother joked that she had to hide his clothes so he could not race down to McDevitt's playing fields anytime he felt like it, which was all the time. Now he is the rec center. Nearly six years ago, Tom "Red Dog" McNicholas, 28, got the job of assistant rec leader at McDevitt.
SPORTS
January 25, 1998 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The improbable has never been an obstacle for Terrell Davis. He's what you might call self-actualized. It doesn't matter to him what others think he should be or do. When the odds are arrayed against him, he doesn't relent. And, probably most important, he doesn't think he's special. He believes everybody is capable of succeeding, and he'll do what he can to help them. Davis is best known as the running back who in just three years has helped transform the Denver Broncos into an NFL title contender again, but here he is known intimately.
NEWS
August 28, 1996 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At first, it just seemed like an early morning fog rising off Little Mantua Creek. But as Inquirer delivery man Joseph Meenan cruised past on his route yesterday, his nose informed him that this was no morning haze, but a fire smoldering in the top floor of a Delaware Avenue home, he said. Meenan hit the brakes and put in a call to police, then backed up his 1994 Corsica, got out, and started pounding on the front door of the house. "If it wasn't for him, I wouldn't have waken up," said John Baumiller, who said he was sound asleep on the couch.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Timothy Carlton "Tim" Rose, an FMC employee, church and community volunteer and mentor, died Thursday of complications after a liver transplant. He was 31 and lived in West Mount Airy. Rose worked for FMC in Center City for the past 11 years and was a computer operator in the controller's department. He was also active in the Big Brothers and Big Sisters organizations, his church and various charitable fund-raising organizations. A graduate of Benjamin Franklin High School, Rose attended Kutztown University and transferred to Peirce Junior College where he received an associate degree in business.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|