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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011
"God Bless the Spectrum," produced by the Daily News , is now available in paperback. The 160-page book, which covers the history of sporting events, concerts and other special nights at the recently leveled building in stories and more than 200 original photographs, can be purchased now for $19.95 at amazon.com or caminobooks.com. It also will be in area bookstores soon.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Hotter than a Chrysler cruising down the sizzling asphalt on a 90-degree afternoon. Hotter than "Valley of the Dolls," and "Jaws," too. It's "Iacocca," the book, again. The autobiography of business superstar Lee Iacocca - a hard-cover best- seller since late 1984 - is blazing like Fourth of July fireworks over the Statue of Liberty during its first few days of paperback release. How hot? So hot that the Chrysler chairman's words went to a second printing - bringing the soft-cover total to 3 million copies - even before it was officially on sale, said Stuart Applebaum, vice president of publicity for Bantam Books.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors include the Associated Press and Knight-Ridder News Service
The Viking Penguin publishing house is trying to kill reports that it may kill a paperback version of Salman Rushdie's book The Satanic Verses until Islamic extremists stop threatening to kill its staff. "No such conditions have been conveyed to Mr. Rushdie nor do they exist as part of the company's position," a Viking Penguin spokesman said. London's Observer newspaper had reported that the publisher would not produce the paperback as long as there was a risk of death or injury to its staff, bookshop assistants or the public.
LIVING
December 27, 1998 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Because of space limitations in the Dec. 6 Books section, the roundup of the year's best paperback books, originally scheduled for that day, appears below. Here's a shelf's worth of paperback titles, some of 1998's finest. Excellent writers of fiction, like gifted magicians, make you believe in spite of everything you know. That's what Ann Patchett does in her enchanting novel The Magician's Assistant (Harcourt Brace, $13). Sabine Parsifal is the magician's assistant of the title; when her magician-husband, Parsifal, dies, she discovers a crucial part of his life that he concealed even from her. Patchett brings a set of wholly original characters through their own magical transformation.
NEWS
February 6, 1995 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Call it Newtonian physics: Print it and they will buy. One of the fastest-selling books in the nation has nothing to do with O.J. Simpson, Garfield or experiences in the afterlife. On Feb. 12, a paperback edition of Newt Gingrich and Co.'s Contract With America will mark its fifth week on the New York Times paperback, nonfiction best-seller list, in a tie for second place with Seinlanguage, by comedian Jerry Seinfeld. Musing about the unexpected blockbuster, House Speaker Gingrich (R., Ga.)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | By Susan Stewart, Special to the Daily News
Except for the awkward moment when we asked Judy Collins if she reads junk, and she said, "Jung? Oh, yes," Collins turned out to be a regular person, less introspective than the anguished autobiography she was promoting, and more fun. "Trust Your Heart" (Fawcett, $4.95 in its new paperback edition) is full of its author's suffering, both specific - polio, tuberculosis, alcoholism and child custody battles - and general, as in, "I ache sometimes, head to foot, inside pulse to eyelids, afraid of opening on the newness, the againness, of the day . . . I feel lost, struggling to pin down some reality, some connection to the source of my life forces.
LIVING
June 30, 1996 | By Michael Harrington, FOR THE INQUIRER
Summer's here. Time for kicking back, splashing on the suntan lotion and fishing a good paperback out of the tote bag. Let the reading commence! Here's a sample of what's available in paperback this summer, from cowpokes to pups, from politics to poetry: Southern novelist Clyde Edgerton heads out West in Redeye (Penguin, $10.95), about an evil-eyed, recalcitrant bulldog mix belonging to Cobb Pittman, the archetypal gunman dressed in black. Looking for a killer in 1892 Colorado, Pittman finds his task complicated by religious fanatics, amateur archaeologists, a Southern belle on holiday, entrepreneurs infatuated with the fledgling science of embalming (one corpse is blown up, another nearly fried by an electrical charge)
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talk paperback books and you talk numbers, big numbers. In 1987, according to an industry research organization, Americans shelled out $1.58 billion for 540 million mass-market paperbacks. By 1992, those figures are expected to hit $2.35 billion for 696 million books. Talk paperback books and you have to talk baby boom. Literally. The largest-selling book in history, with the exception of the Bible, is Baby and Child Care, by Benjamin Spock, pediatrician to the postwar masses, the man Spiro Agnew blamed for the 1960s counterculture movement.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max is 27, an up-and-coming ad writer. Nora is 41 years old and blowzy, a waitress at a hamburger stand. The love affair between these unlikely characters - he is as fastidious, well-read and middle-class as she is slatternly, uneducated and lower-class - is the focus of White Palace, an arresting first novel by Glenn Savan. It is one of two debut titles, along with Ann Hood's Somewhere Off the Coast of Maine, starting the Bantam New Fiction series of trade paperbacks this month.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | By Michael Harrington, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ah, summer arrives this week! Time for the beach, time for the mountains, time for hammocks and porch rockers; time to read, read, read! No matter what your plans, whether traveling or staying put, chances are you'll make time for a book or two or 10. What better getaway than a tale well-told? Here is a sampling of the season's best paperback fiction: Gus Lee's Honor and Duty (Ivy Books, $6.99), the sequel to China Boy, sends Lee's alter ego, Kai Ting, to West Point in 1964, where he struggles with emotional tangles and self-doubt born of family dysfunction and ethnic pressures.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
CAPTAIN NOAH said his days were numbered, back in March when I sat down with him for an interview. "At my age, you know you're closer to death than when you were 49," said the captain, a.k.a. W. Carter Merbreier, star of Captain Noah and His Magical Ark , the iconic kids' show that ran on WPVI-TV from 1967 to 1994. "And please don't say, 'Oh, but even a 49-year-old could get hit by a truck!' as though the odds of dying soon are equal for everyone. At 89, my odds are greater. " So, in preparation for the obituaries he knew reporters would one day write about his life, he had sent to the Daily News a paperback version of his 2014 Kindle book, Captain Noah and His Magical Ark: Remembrances and Ruminations About the Animals and the Guests - Celebrities, Sports and Music Stars - Who Prowled Our Decks . It was a magazine-size, name-dropping paperback whose 74 pages documented Merbreier's favorite memories of his 27-year children's-television career.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Lidija Dorjkhand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Recent romance releases include a sweet story about struggling newlyweds, a twist on a very familiar theme, and a bittersweet tale of love among Shifters.   Midnight Promises By Sherryl Woods Harlequin Mira, $7.99 paperback Midnight Promises continues the story of single mother Karen Ames and sexy personal trainer Elliott Cruz. We first met them in Woods' Feels Like Family , a previous entry in the Sweet Magnolia series, in which they were secondary characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - E.L. James' Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy, a word-of-mouth romance smash so erotic it's sometimes labeled "mommy porn," has been signed up by a paperback division of Random House Inc. Vintage Books announced Saturday that it had acquired the three books - Fifty Shades of Grey , Fifty Shades Darker and Fifty Shades Freed . E-book editions will be out today, and paperbacks are expected in early April. The novels had been distributed by an Australia-based publisher, the Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The original Gimbel Brothers building on Market Street between Eighth and Ninth is now a parking lot. There is no trace of the defunct department store in what is now the Gallery, or in any suburban mall for that matter. The once-bustling chain, which once owned Saks Fifth Avenue, closed its doors in Philadelphia 25 years ago. So why write a book about Gimbels now? "Because just hearing the name makes people happy," said Michael J. Lisicky, author of Gimbels Has It!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011
"God Bless the Spectrum," produced by the Daily News , is now available in paperback. The 160-page book, which covers the history of sporting events, concerts and other special nights at the recently leveled building in stories and more than 200 original photographs, can be purchased now for $19.95 at amazon.com or caminobooks.com. It also will be in area bookstores soon.
NEWS
May 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
H. Tom Hall, 77, a painter and an illustrator, died of melanoma Saturday, May 1, at his home in East Nantmeal. For 40 years, Mr. Hall produced hundreds of covers for paperback romance novels, painting voluptuous women and their handsome lovers against backgrounds of stately mansions, ships tossed in roiling seas, or tropical foliage. His commissions included best sellers Shanna and Ashes in the Wind, by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss; The Thorn Birds, by Colleen McCullough; and Anne Rice's Interview With the Vampire.
LIVING
December 13, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What better gift than a good book? OK, right, 10,000 shares of Google stock, but play along. If your giftees are readers, books are great for the holidays. The Inquirer staff, great writers and readers both, offer these suggestions, with our holiday best wishes: Nonfiction, bios and autobios. Bill Marimow, editor of The Inquirer, likes The First Tycoon, by T.J. Stiles (Knopf, $37.50), "an epic biography of Cornelius Vanderbilt. " He also praises former ABC news correspondent Kati Marton's Enemies of the People: My Family's Journey to America (Simon & Schuster, $28)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Frank Wilson FOR THE INQUIRER
With all the talk these days about the demise of the book, it is useful to remember that not all books are created equal. An eminently disposable paperback of a Dan Brown thriller picked up at the airport is one thing, the catalogue raisonn? of a master artist's work issued by a major museum quite another. Amazon's Kindle is a wonderfully convenient device, and it may be possible, in the not so distant future, to download onto it an entire art book in all its glorious shades of color.
NEWS
August 6, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
Best Find: Ardmore Paperback Book Shop What we like: Established on the Main Line in 1962, the shop sells new and used books from 60 cents to $75. It is one of the few places selling Philadelphia author Jerome Verlin's Homeland and other Middle East titles, owner Daniel Salsburg said. The shop offers an array of religious titles, from Are You Rapture Ready by Todd Strandberg and James D. Terry for $12 and Essential Tao by Thomas Cleary for $13 to a selection of Korans ($11)
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