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NEWS
May 19, 2010
School district officials said these 15 administrators are not certified to run their schools. However, the district said, all 15 have taken steps to get their paperwork up to date. They are: Joe Dixon, Birney Elementary School Willie Fisher, Barry Elemen-tary Timothy Stults, University City High Kevin Parson, Clymer Elementary Schnee Grayson, Parkway West High Reginald Fisher, Frankford High Ignace Wolf, Wilson Middle School Angela Edwards, McMichael Elementary Saliya Cruz, West Philadelphia High Aaron Starke, Huey Elemen-tary Ron Reilly, Willard Elementary Beverly Wallace, Lincoln High Marilyn Quarterman, Ellwood Elementary Lynda Benhaim, Military Academy at Leeds Ximena Carreno, Munoz-Marin Elementary
SPORTS
July 6, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Roger Goodell and DeMaurice Smith will conduct NFL labor talks later this week after letting the lawyers handle paperwork for 2 days. Attorneys for the NFL and the players' association are sorting out contract language and details that could speed the process in reaching a new collective bargaining agreement. "The owners will not open the doors without a signed document in place," a person with knowledge of the talks told the Associated Press yesterday. "So this paperwork is important to get done" yesterday and today.
SPORTS
April 22, 1994 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
You know that groundbreaking for Spectrum II you've been waiting breathlessly for? Hold those shovels. Ed Snider, the driving force behind the new, state-of-the-art arena that will be built on the former site of John F. Kennedy Stadium, says the project is momentarily mired in paperwork. "There are 300 documents that have to be completed," said Snider, the founder of Spectacor and the owner of the Flyers. "It's time consuming and aggravating, but it all has to be done.
SPORTS
February 21, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Rasheed Wallace was barely allowed to break a sweat in his debut with the Detroit Pistons. After Wallace played 12 minutes in the first half, the NBA ruled he could not play because of a paperwork issue. Minus their newly acquired big man, the Pistons lost to visiting Minnesota, 88-87, last night. Kevin Garnett had 25 points and 13 rebounds to lead the Timberwolves to their fifth straight victory. Detroit has lost seven of eight. Wallace was dealt just before the trading deadline Thursday after playing only one game for Atlanta, which him from Portland last week.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden Board of Education took steps last night to replace missing documentation for $26 million in school lunch and other spending, and to ensure that the records are not lost again. The district used most of the money to subsidize free- and low-cost lunch programs that served about 6,000 students. Last night, school officials said they would be able to produce records for about 5,000 students. The plan adopted by the board provides that two copies of original documents be placed on microfilm.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Ann Belser, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Last month, 31,741 Pennsylvanians were cut from Medical Assistance, the insurance that covers people who are disabled, poor, or gravely ill. Almost 18,000 children lost their benefits. The reduction is a point of pride for state Department of Public Welfare officials, who are trying to cut the budget by clearing out ineligible recipients whose paperwork was not complete. But workers and advocates say that in many cases, the fault doesn't lie with the recipients but with the Welfare Department.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In his 18 years working with veterans, Lou Palumbo has seen it far too many times. A veteran loses his military paperwork and must wait months for the federal government to process duplicates so that he can get benefits. Or a widow needs her husband's discharge papers to make his funeral arrangements. She, too, must wait. Now, having watched the same look of frustration appear on countless faces, Palumbo, director of Monroe's Department of Veterans Affairs, and the township administration have a solution.
NEWS
October 9, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 70 Temple University graduate students are finding it hard to pay their bills this month because the university is late in paying them for their teaching duties. The students' paychecks for teaching undergraduate classes during September weren't distributed as promised at month's end. For some grad students teaching full time, the monthly paychecks amount to about $1,500 gross. Disgruntled students say it's not the first time Temple has failed to pay up. "For years, every fall semester, one group or another has let us know about problems with getting paid on time," said Rob Callahan, spokesman for the union representing about 500 of Temple's graduate students who work on campus.
SPORTS
February 13, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden boys' basketball team still has a chance to participate in the NJSIAA state tournament, despite not being listed as an entrant when pairings were released yesterday. NJSIAA executive director Boyd Sands said Camden had failed to send the necessary paperwork, but the school could still compete under two provisions. If Camden wants to play in the South Jersey Group 3 tournament that begins March 2, the school must pay a $150 fine, and play every game on the road, Sands said.
NEWS
February 23, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal investigator who spent three years probing the company charged with fabricating records after the starvation death of teenager Danieal Kelly described wading through a rain-soaked Dumpster in 2007 to retrieve documents tossed out by someone at the agency. "I climbed up the Dumpster and jumped inside," said William McDonald, an agent from the Department of Health and Human Services' inspector general's office. There, he spotted two white trash bags that turned out to contain telephone logs and reports subpoenaed by the government.
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REAL_ESTATE
September 28, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I don't sleep long enough to do much dreaming, except when I'm on vacation. Which means my experience with nightmares is limited. Many friends tell me that their worst nightmare is appearing in front of an audience naked. High on the list of nightmare scenarios for many home sellers, though, is having no proof they have paid off their mortgages. It may not be the worst real estate nightmare - foreclosure, in a society that puts homeownership at the top of the list of "American dreams," is No. 1, I think, given the experience of the last eight years.
NEWS
April 30, 2014
AS THE DAYS get longer and sunnier, many of us are inspired to do some spring cleaning. I like to take that tradition and apply it to my financial life. After the tax deadline passes, and everything is fresh in our minds, my husband and I start to talk about revisiting our budget. We update our net worth statement. And he usually shreds financial documents we don't need. But this spring, what I'm going to do for my financial life is inspired by the struggles I'm having in trying to help my mother, who was critically injured in a fire at her home.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S A SPECIAL place in hell for the people whose bureaucratic BS put Meredith Gill in the middle of busy John F. Kennedy Boulevard in a broken wheelchair. Gill, a quadriplegic, was crossing the boulevard earlier this month when her motorized wheelchair suddenly stopped. Luckily she had the green light, so she was able to lurch it back to life long enough to get to the sidewalk. By the time she got to her job at Hahnemann University Hospital, with her chair jolting to a stop every few feet, Gill was in tears.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One year ago this week, Pennsylvania tied eligibility for food stamps to the assets people possess. Since then, nearly 4,000 households have lost or were denied benefits because they had too many financial resources, according to the Department of Public Welfare. In that same time, many more people - around 111,000 households - were denied benefits because they failed to provide proper documentation for the asset test. Advocates for the poor now say that by weeding out a relatively small number of people with too many assets, the Department of Public Welfare made getting food stamps so complicated that deserving low-income people became inundated by paperwork and lost their benefits.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The phone was ringing off the hook when the H&R Block office in the shopping center at 23rd and Oregon in South Philadelphia opened Monday - Tax Day - and the last-minute filers began streaming in, waving their paperwork and hoping the pros could make things as painless as possible. Denise Evans, a bus driver clutching her pay stubs and Form 1040-A, said she had tried to avoid paying extra for her taxes: "I thought I could do this on my own this year," she said. "I looked it up on You Tube.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was supposed to be a festive celebration at Philadelphia International Airport's Terminal A East on Thursday, with greetings from Mayor Nutter, an Elvis impersonator, and cowboy hats for everyone as Spirit Airlines began nonstop service to Dallas-Fort Worth. It didn't quite turn out that way, though, because of Federal Aviation Administration paperwork. Chalk it up to the federal budget sequester? Spirit, known for its low fares and add-on fees for such things as carry-on baggage, has been around for 25 years, and it has inaugurated service at dozens of airports.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare this month launched an unprecedented Medicaid audit at 75 nursing homes in Southeastern Pennsylvania as part of a campaign to eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse. Industry executives and others, who say long-term care centers already undergo frequent audits, said they were not worried about the possible discovery of expensive errors. But they dread the logistics of preparing four years of Medicaid billing records for 100 percent review - while puzzling over how much money the DPW expects to recover from improper bills.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IN ADDITION to charges that he's facing in an alleged spree of 16 armed robberies of Northeast Philadelphia pharmacies, a 29-year-old man also will be charged with falsifying paperwork in trying to buy a gun in September, the District Attorney's Office said Thursday. Edward Schaeffer was arrested along with William Webb, 50, Monday night after police said the pair robbed a Rite Aid in Rhawnhurst and were tracked back to a house in Tacony via a GPS device in one of the pill bottles they allegedly stole.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
After living illegally in the United States for almost a decade, 19-year-old college student Sheila Quintana has the prize in her sights: a Social Security number. "Having a nine-digit number doesn't make you a better person," said Quintana, of West Chester. "But it does make life easier. " On Wednesday, the federal government embarked on a new, and fervidly debated, program that allows young undocumented immigrants to work legally in this country, providing they meet certain criteria.
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