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FOOD
December 7, 1986 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
The mise en scene: a "typical" restaurant in Budapest, described in the course of a New Yorker report on the first postwar Grand Prix in an Eastern European country. The personnel: reporters, drivers and miscellaneous hangers-on: " ' What is this red powder?' asked someone at a table of Italians. 'They call it paprika,' answered another Italian informatively. 'They eat it here. It is ver-y, ver-y strong. They have perhaps given it to us to test our virility.' " Americans, accustomed to thinking of paprika - when they think of it at all - as something good only for testing one's immunity to boredom, may well be surprised at this exchange.
FOOD
February 20, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
We take for granted a dusting of bright orange-red paprika on chicken or broiled fish. In Spain and Hungary, however, artisanal-quality paprika is essential to cookery. In both countries, specially selected varieties of paprika peppers raised with a great deal of care and expertise are selected for ripeness before harvesting, and then either sun-dried in Hungary, or oak-smoked in Spain. Roasting and grinding paprika remains, in both countries, an art relying on years of experience and intuition.
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | Daily News wire services
BUDAPEST POISONOUS PAPRIKA PULLED OFF SHELVES The Hungarian government has unwillingly pulled paprika off store shelves after much of it was found to be adulterated with a toxic substance. But the poisonous paprika, spiked with anti-corrosion agent that brightened its fiery color, was sold for more than a month before the government took action. Forty-six people were hospitalized with lead poisoning. Paprika exports were not affected. "I can only condemn those greedy enough to do this for that extra profit edge, but I am also angry with the government for not taking action sooner," said Hajnal Csatorday, 45, the mother of three teen-agers.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes 1 large onion, coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed and peeled 2 tablespoons capers, drained and rinsed 1 (4-inch-long) serrano or 2 Thai  chiles, stemmed, half of the  seeds removed, coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon smoked paprika Kosher salt and freshly ground  black pepper 2 (1-pound) rib-eye steaks, each about 1 inch thick 2 tablespoons olive oil 1. In a food processor, combine the tomatoes, onion, garlic, capers, chilies, sugar, paprika, and 2 teaspoons salt.
FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes a generous 11/4 cups 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons    extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup raw unsalted cashews 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon sweet smoked paprika (pimento dulce) 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and    coarsely chopped 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/3 cup water 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt 1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until the oil shimmers.
FOOD
November 5, 1989 | By Bev Bennett, Special to The Inquirer
The beginning of November is always a reminder to get serious about winter. No longer can you delude yourself into thinking you'll find local tomatoes in the supermarket, or that you'll be able to throw any fish you want on the grill for dinner. November is definitely soup weather - time for savory, robust mixtures that offer relief from damp days and windy evenings. Ideally, the soups of this season are nourishing, yet not as heavy as the dead-of-winter versions (after all, some sort of heavier culinary artillery ought to be saved for January)
NEWS
October 21, 2007
I love the bold fruit and rowdy spice of a good red zin, especially when I put the tailgate grill and chili pot into fall overdrive. And the wines from Seghesio are among the most consistent zinfandels I know. Unlike other, lesser zins, which overindulge the grape's typically ripe fruit and high-alcohol heat, Seghesio delivers fullness with balance. The Cortina is one of my favorite high-end zinfandels ($26.99 in Pennsylvania), but the standard Sonoma bottling is also excellent for about $20 or less.
FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the cooking blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Butternut squash has been calling to me from the supermarket shelf lately, especially since so many markets now offer it peeled and sliced and ready to go. All the hard work is done! My friend Melinda reminded me of a quinoa and butternut squash salad recipe we both love because of its great combo of spice and citrus. But I was wishing for a more wintry version of the salad, something hot and more like a stew.
FOOD
May 14, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! Where does the chef at the Vega Grill in Manayunk get his exotic ingredients? I have tried to purchase plantains and empanada dough, but have had no luck in Center City markets. Charles R. O'Donald Philadelphia Dear Charles, Guillermo Pernot, the Vega Grill's Argentinean chef, buys most of his produce from wholesalers. Before the restaurant opened, Pernot did his shopping at Cousin's Super Market at 5th and Luzerne streets, which stocks a wide selection of tropical and Latino ingredients.
FOOD
November 9, 1994 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
Friends who gather at Harvey Finkle's house for "Monday Night Football" are leg and thigh men. When it comes to chicken, that is. For the past 10 years, this motley group - which includes a nurse who used to drive tractor-trailers, three photographers, two businessmen and a retired schoolteacher - has feasted on Finkle's "secret recipe" chicken and rice at his South Philadelphia home before watching MNF together. "We used to play basketball on Monday nights at the Athletic Club," Finkle said.
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FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes a generous 11/4 cups 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons    extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup raw unsalted cashews 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon sweet smoked paprika (pimento dulce) 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and    coarsely chopped 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/3 cup water 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt 1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until the oil shimmers.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes 1 large onion, coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed and peeled 2 tablespoons capers, drained and rinsed 1 (4-inch-long) serrano or 2 Thai  chiles, stemmed, half of the  seeds removed, coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon smoked paprika Kosher salt and freshly ground  black pepper 2 (1-pound) rib-eye steaks, each about 1 inch thick 2 tablespoons olive oil 1. In a food processor, combine the tomatoes, onion, garlic, capers, chilies, sugar, paprika, and 2 teaspoons salt.
FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the cooking blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Butternut squash has been calling to me from the supermarket shelf lately, especially since so many markets now offer it peeled and sliced and ready to go. All the hard work is done! My friend Melinda reminded me of a quinoa and butternut squash salad recipe we both love because of its great combo of spice and citrus. But I was wishing for a more wintry version of the salad, something hot and more like a stew.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I used to think it wasn't possible to have too much of a good thing, and for the longest time, that was my sentiment regarding our abbondanza of Italian BYOBs. Who doesn't want a go-to trattoria for an affordable plate of pasta and a juicy branzino within a short walk of home? And yet, when Novità opened its doors on the 1600 block of South Street in the fall, the realization that there were nearly a dozen Italian BYOBs now within a five-block radius had an unexpected effect.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
I love the bold fruit and rowdy spice of a good red zin, especially when I put the tailgate grill and chili pot into fall overdrive. And the wines from Seghesio are among the most consistent zinfandels I know. Unlike other, lesser zins, which overindulge the grape's typically ripe fruit and high-alcohol heat, Seghesio delivers fullness with balance. The Cortina is one of my favorite high-end zinfandels ($26.99 in Pennsylvania), but the standard Sonoma bottling is also excellent for about $20 or less.
FOOD
February 20, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
We take for granted a dusting of bright orange-red paprika on chicken or broiled fish. In Spain and Hungary, however, artisanal-quality paprika is essential to cookery. In both countries, specially selected varieties of paprika peppers raised with a great deal of care and expertise are selected for ripeness before harvesting, and then either sun-dried in Hungary, or oak-smoked in Spain. Roasting and grinding paprika remains, in both countries, an art relying on years of experience and intuition.
FOOD
May 14, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! Where does the chef at the Vega Grill in Manayunk get his exotic ingredients? I have tried to purchase plantains and empanada dough, but have had no luck in Center City markets. Charles R. O'Donald Philadelphia Dear Charles, Guillermo Pernot, the Vega Grill's Argentinean chef, buys most of his produce from wholesalers. Before the restaurant opened, Pernot did his shopping at Cousin's Super Market at 5th and Luzerne streets, which stocks a wide selection of tropical and Latino ingredients.
FOOD
November 9, 1994 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
Friends who gather at Harvey Finkle's house for "Monday Night Football" are leg and thigh men. When it comes to chicken, that is. For the past 10 years, this motley group - which includes a nurse who used to drive tractor-trailers, three photographers, two businessmen and a retired schoolteacher - has feasted on Finkle's "secret recipe" chicken and rice at his South Philadelphia home before watching MNF together. "We used to play basketball on Monday nights at the Athletic Club," Finkle said.
FOOD
October 12, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Today's high-tech home kitchen hums with the whir of food processors and electric can openers, the squish of automated juicers, the hiss of cappuccino machines, the beep of microwave ovens. So why has Carrie J. Gamble written a self-published cookbook that uses none of them? Because her grandmother, Elizabeth Rose von Hohen, never needed them to make the 145 recipes contained in their collaborative effort, "Grandmother's Cookbook" ($16.95). Gamble, an illustrator who lives near Doylestown, wrote down the recipes from von Hohen's files and memories, and provided watercolor artwork for the book.
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | Daily News wire services
BUDAPEST POISONOUS PAPRIKA PULLED OFF SHELVES The Hungarian government has unwillingly pulled paprika off store shelves after much of it was found to be adulterated with a toxic substance. But the poisonous paprika, spiked with anti-corrosion agent that brightened its fiery color, was sold for more than a month before the government took action. Forty-six people were hospitalized with lead poisoning. Paprika exports were not affected. "I can only condemn those greedy enough to do this for that extra profit edge, but I am also angry with the government for not taking action sooner," said Hajnal Csatorday, 45, the mother of three teen-agers.
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