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Parachute

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NEWS
May 24, 1994
We thought we understood the concept of corporate golden parachutes - those generous severance packages that go to CEOs and other bigwigs, when they choose (or are forced) to retire. We thought the operative word was "corporate. " But the cushy deal Philadelphia has given former prison commissioner J. Patrick Gallagher suggests that even a cash-strapped city - with a mayor for whom "productivity" and "efficiency" are a mantra - can be convinced by a smooth operator to fashion a chute of purest platinum.
SPORTS
August 31, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Duke officials were a bit surprised when about an hour before the scheduled kickoff of their game last night against James Madison, two men parachuted into Wallace Wade Stadium and landed at the 35-yard line with a game ball. Problem was, the Blue Devils - who were warming up on the field along with their foes - weren't expecting it. "All we know is, they must have missed their jump site," a team official said. And they did - because the jump site was meant to be about eight miles away.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bala Cynwyd man who died in a skydiving accident last week in Monroe Township did not attempt to open his parachute, authorities said Tuesday. They identified the victim as Donald Lawrence Morozin, 62. Accident investigators found that the certified skydiver, who had performed more than 3,500 jumps, had not pulled the parachute's primary or emergency chords, said Mary Pyffer, trial chief with the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office....
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Trish Boppert
It was just a matter of time before the American flag became the rallying point for those seeking to make a buck off the patriotic fever that has swept the country since Sept. 11. Or at least to extend advertising potential in light of the decided unease and lingering sorrow that grips the nation. Within hours of the destruction of the World Trade Center towers, the pre-attack postcards were reportedly selling briskly. A cottage industry of T-shirts sprang up soon after, offering sentiments such as "We Will Never Forget," "Fear No Evil," and the ubiquitous "September 11, 2001," with the towers standing in for the numeral 11. Stuck at home recently, waiting for the plumber to call back, I had the dubious pleasure of watching daytime TV. First, a commercial for a collection of sturdy flags that mount easily to car or truck.
SPORTS
January 2, 1994 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many have long dreamed of flying through the air, on a hang glider, or from a parachute, but never have. While on vacation here, on this strip of beach off the northeastern coast of the Yucatan peninsula, a young man had an epiphany: He could take to the air as a parasailor. This is cheating, really, for the parachutist or the hang glider is turned over to the whims of nature. The parasailor has an umbilical cord, the rope that connects the parasailor from the sky to a boat. The parasailor is attached to an open parachute and launched into the air off the stern of a speeding boat.
NEWS
December 18, 1996
Just in time for the holidays come two stories of extraordinary corporate generosity. One delights; the other infuriates. Together, they pose hard questions about how the corporate world treats a valuable asset - the much-maligned and downsized American worker. It's the cofounders of an Orange County, Calif., technology company who have delighted, with a $100 million bonus package for their 523 employees. And it's the Walt Disney Co. that has folks hot under the collar, with its $90 million stock-and-cash settlement for president Michael Ovitz, who's leaving after 14 months with no discernible achievements.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For 60 seconds Sunday morning Denise Daddio performed an air ballet, bolstered by the confidence gained in more than 500 successful jumps. She twisted and turned to choreographed moves with her skydiving partner. The two started at 13,500 feet, and they plummeted toward the ground at 125 miles an hour. After just one minute of free fall, their altimeters read 4,000 feet and the pair broke away to deploy their parachutes. Daddio pulled her rip cord. The pilot chute - a small parachute attached to the top of the main chute - deployed, according to witnesses.
NEWS
July 6, 2005 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sara Loshe and Ron Samac had just started dating, brought together by their love of skydiving. And that's how they died, with parachutes entangled during a Fourth of July jump. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the accident at the Freefall Adventures Skydiving School at Cross Keys Airport in Gloucester County. An investigator spent yesterday interviewing witnesses and the manager of the Williamstown operation, FAA spokesman Jim Peters said. Loshe and Samac collided about 150 feet above the ground, falling the equivalent of a 15-story building and crashing onto a field about 2:30 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynn L. Elsenhans, the former Sunoco Inc. chief executive, stands to bank $37.4 million for dramatically transforming the Philadelphia oil company that is being sold to a Texas pipeline firm. Elsenhans will receive a severance benefit of $6 million, according to papers filed Thursday - her last day as chairwoman - with the Securities and Exchange Commission. And, she will receive an additional $17.1 million if the $5.3 billion merger that was announced Monday with Energy Transfer Partners L.P. is consummated.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Serafin Natal had trouble walking in Philadelphia's first Veterans Day Parade on Sunday. But he would not stop. The 65-year-old Navy man had beaten renal cancer caused by exposure to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. Doctors took a kidney out of him 10 years ago - only for diabetes to come along, knocking some of the feeling out of his feet. But the retired Juniata Park factory worker was on a mission Sunday. His colonial city was making history, if more than two centuries late.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
FOLLOWING intense criticism, City Council President Darrell Clarke agreed yesterday to add a "safety-net" provision to legislation that would extend a city sales-tax increase so that, even if state lawmakers don't act on the issue this spring, the tax would be extended and the School District of Philadelphia would get $120 million next year. "What we can't do is allow ourselves to be in a position that if there are some changes in the existing state provision or some changes in the proposal that we put forth, that we're not in a position to take advantage of the extension of the sales tax," Clarke told reporters after Council's regular session yesterday.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEWELL A Brooklyn, N.Y., man who died Sunday in Sewell during a skydiving jump loved the sport so much that he was willing to risk death, his son said. Arkady Shenker was to turn 50 this week. Instead, his son, Alex, 24, said his family is preparing for services to honor the husband and father of two who loved adventure. "Whatever hardships he had in life, they just melted away after a couple of jumps," his son said. "To him, the danger was just danger. He said, if he ever goes, that's the way he wanted to go. I guess he got his wish.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Brian Sanders' Junk's production for the 2013 Fringe Festival, Hush Now Sweet High Heels and Oak , swings between childhood dreams and nightmares. Set to a haunting score of familiar lullabies created by his sister, Stephanie Sanders, this show, at the 23d Street Armory, departs from his usual dark, hard, techno look and sound from past Fringe seasons. The glowy white, softly draping set consists of huge banners hung from the rafters over three white-sheeted beds, a parachute covering a raised mound of sand beneath, and an "oak tree" that reaches to the ceiling of the armory.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ousted Commerce Bank founder Vernon Hill II really wants the $17.2 million golden parachute in his employment contract. So, even though a federal jury, after a two-week trial in federal court in Camden, told him no, he filed papers last month seeking a new trial. But what would have happened if the jury's May 21 verdict had been yes? Would the bank, now TD Bank, even have been allowed to follow the jury's verdict and pay Hill? That question is at the heart of Hill's request for a new trial.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether the jury will feel sympathy for Vernon W. Hill 2d, the ousted founder of Commerce Bank, and his legal quest to wrest $17.2 million in golden parachute benefits from the bank remains to be seen. In federal court Thursday, Hill explained why he didn't fight his June 28, 2007, firing from the banking empire that he had built from one storefront in Marlton in 1973. "This was my bank," Hill said in U.S. District Judge Robert B. Kugler's Camden courtroom. "It was obvious to me that the best thing for the bank was for me to leave.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
School district buys 14 rifles FONTANA, Calif. - The school police force in this Southern California city has acquired 14 high-powered semiautomatic rifles for officers to bring to campuses. Fontana Unified School District police purchased 14 of the Colt LE6940 rifles in the fall, delivered the first week of December, a week before the massacre at a Connecticut elementary school. "I think it just further solidified the need to give our officers the tools they need to respond to an active shooter on campus," schools Police Chief Billy Green said Wednesday about the tragedy.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bala Cynwyd man who died in a skydiving accident last week in Monroe Township did not attempt to open his parachute, authorities said Tuesday. They identified the victim as Donald Lawrence Morozin, 62. Accident investigators found that the certified skydiver, who had performed more than 3,500 jumps, had not pulled the parachute's primary or emergency chords, said Mary Pyffer, trial chief with the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office....
NEWS
November 22, 2012
A man was killed in a parachute accident late Wednesday afternoon in Gloucester County, authorities said. The accident occurred at Freefall Adventures, which provides skydiving lessons and activities at the Cross Keys Airport in Williamstown. The man's name was not released. His body was found about 300 feet from the parachute landing zone, authorities said. The accident is under investigation by the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office and the Federal Aviation Administration. The former mayor of Rutledge Borough, Delaware County, died in 2011 during a skydiving accident at Freefall Adventures.
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