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Parachute

NEWS
June 21, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stephen L. Snyder, 64, whose childhood dreams of flying bloomed into a more than 50-year career in aeronautics, died Saturday when his 1956-vintage F-86 Sabre jet fighter crashed at his airfield - South Jersey Regional Airport in Lumberton. The cause of the crash is under investigation. Mr. Snyder, a Moorestown resident for the last 19 years, was an aeronautical engineer who purchased the airport in a 1988 bankruptcy sale. He had dreams of turning a profit - a goal that eluded the previous owners.
LIVING
January 20, 1999 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Crime is not usually a big worry in this wealthy Southern California city, where the average house price is $750,000 and large estates line the quiet, landscaped streets. So when the news broke early this month that a 17-year-old had been kidnapped from his home and held, chained and gagged, for 18 days, many in the community were understandably shocked. Then came even more startling news: that the kidnapping scheme had been hatched in China - and that it was not the first of its kind here.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Back when Karen Buchholz's husband, Carl, was a law student at Penn, living at 22nd and Pine streets, and she a mere sales associate at the CoreStates Spectrum, living at 16th and Spruce, dinner at Astral Plane was one of their favorite date-night treats. The fluffy, tufted parachute ceiling, the crimson walls dense with framed sepia and black-and-white photos of old movie stars, the hodgepodge of tables covered in floral, and the chotchkes crammed wherever an offending bit of space allows - it's all still the same.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
The Double D Gymnastics team, including (from left) Corey Densmore, Kayleigh Gilligan and Patrick Densmore, use a parachute to show off their skills. The team was part of the entertainment Saturday at a combined celebration of Middletown Township's Pride Day and Friends of Elwyn Festival at Elwyn Inc.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stay away. That is, if you wish to remain sane. On Saturday, as 12,000 Villanova and University of Delaware fans descend on campus for the Wildcats' homecoming game, already congested Lancaster Avenue will be partially closed from 7:30 to 10 a.m. for a fun run in Wayne. Then it will be shut down completely from 2 to 4 p.m. between Radnor-Chester and Conestoga/Eagle Roads for a Radnor Fire Company parade. "Traffic nightmare" is an accurate description of what they expect this weekend, Radnor Township police said.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Staff Sgt. Joseph Zippilli's belief that war is indeed hell came when a German corporal on a motorcycle and Hungarian civilians started racing toward him as he was parachuting into a field near Budapest on April 13, 1944. The German corporal got there first and had to hold the hostile civilians at gunpoint until Zippilli could climb onto the back of the motorcycle. Ed Barniskis of Cherry Hill learned how horrible war can be on May 6, 1942, the day he and 250 other soldiers surrendered Fort Drum, an island fortress near Corregidor, to the Japanese.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
No one was skydiving above Cross Keys Airport yesterday. Gray skies grounded the planes, leaving routine jumpers to grieve and wonder what caused veteran skydiver Denise Daddio to plunge to her death Sunday afternoon. Friends said Daddio, 43, of Hamilton Township, was on her first jump of the day when her parachute failed to open. An unidentified friend who jumped with her said she appeared to pull the two cords needed to deploy a small pilot chute and main parachute before plunging 13,500 feet into a wooded area in Washington Township.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For 60 seconds Sunday morning Denise Daddio performed an air ballet, bolstered by the confidence gained in more than 500 successful jumps. She twisted and turned to choreographed moves with her skydiving partner. The two started at 13,500 feet, and they plummeted toward the ground at 125 miles an hour. After just one minute of free fall, their altimeters read 4,000 feet and the pair broke away to deploy their parachutes. Daddio pulled her rip cord. The pilot chute - a small parachute attached to the top of the main chute - deployed, according to witnesses.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Millions of Americans jumped out of bed this morning. Dale Nelson jumped out of an airplane. Again and again and again and again. . . . Nelson, of Malvern, Pa., is attempting to break the Guinness Book world record for the most consecutive sky dives in a 24-hour period. If all goes as planned, Nelson will throw his 48-year-old body out of an aircraft over Cross Keys Airport every 3 1/2 minutes. To beat the record held by Jay Stokes of Arizona, Nelson must dive more than 384 times before the clock strikes 1 p.m. today - more than 16 jumps per hour.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Faye Flam contributed to this article
George Bush jumped from an airplane at 72. Mark Spitz tried to qualify again for the Olympics - and narrowly missed - at 40. And now John Glenn wants to return to space at 76. The message, according to experts on aging, is that the number of candles on your birthday cake no longer matters. What matters is how you feel, what you are capable of. "This just shows that age is irrelevant," said Ronald Klatz, president of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine. "Age means less and less and less today.
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