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Parade

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NEWS
September 26, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Crowds lined Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Chestnut Street yesterday to watch the Puerto Rican Week Festival parade. The parade, which started at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and proceeded to Independence Hall, wrapped up the festival.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT ROWAN
Even paraders need a rest. Pet owners and their pets did just that July 11 at Charlestown Nature Center. The pets and owners had gathered for the sixth annual pet parade.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | BOB LARAMIE/ DAILY NEWS
Pop singer Anita Baker belts out a hit at the Mann Music Center last night.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
Marching bands, horse soldiers, Army tanks and costumed dancers highlighted yesterday's Pulaski Day parade in honor of Revolutionary War hero Gen. Casimir Pulaski. Tourists who were locked out of the Liberty Bell pavilion and Independence Hall because of the U.S. budget impasse joined thousands of other parade watchers for the colorful spectacle. The parade marked the 10th anniversary of Solidarity and was dedicated to Polish presidential candidate Lech Walesa.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / SEAN PATRICK DUFFY
Bristol Borough's Christmas parade hit the streets Saturday for the first time since 1988. The tradition had been stalled after merchants complained that the parade cut into time that holiday shoppers could spend in their stores and disagreements broke out about who would portray Santa. This year the parade was moved to Farragut Avenue and Pond Street instead of the business district on Mill Street. And spectators lined its route.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/ DAILY NEWS
Polish-Americans yesterday celebrated Pulaski Day with a parade in Center City and ceremonies later at Independence Square. The day's program began with a memorial Mass at St. Hedwig Roman Catholic Church, 24th and Brown streets, followed by a wreath-laying ceremony at the General Casimir Pulaski memorial statue at the Art Museum quadrangle. Pulaski was a Revolutionary War hero. The parade featured military and ROTC units, police officers and firefighters.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Veterans Committee of We the People 200 Inc., which had complained about disabled veterans' participation in the Sept. 17 bicentennial parade, has resolved its differences with parade planners, its chairman said yesterday. "The veterans are very happy," said Philip Rein, head of the veterans' group. The committee met Monday with Willard G. Rouse 3d, chairman of We the People 200 Inc. The committee and Rouse worked out an arrangement for some disabled veterans to ride in vehicles behind the war floats in the second, or "Preamble," section of the parade, said We the People spokesman Sam Rogers.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
No security blankets were needed at the 10th Annual Teddy Bears Picnic, held at Peddler's Village in Lahaska on July 10.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Donations and sponsorships have slumped for next month's small, family-friendly Mummers Parade in Manayunk, and organizers fear they know why: The caricatures and put-downs of African Americans, Mexicans, gays, and transsexuals that marred the big New Year's Day parade on Broad Street. "The people we're reaching out to are not saying yes," said Jane Lipton, executive director of the Manayunk Development Corp. "They're saying no in the most polite way. " The second-year parade expected a boost in corporate interest, having proved itself, but has been unable to land a lead sponsor, Lipton and others said.
TRAVEL
February 1, 2016 | By Emily Whelahan, For The Inquirer
On Saturday morning of my first week studying abroad in Australia, I embarked on a daylong tour of Phillip Island. The ultimate draw of the tour was supposed to be the famous "penguin parade," during which penguins come back from sea as the sun sets. Surprisingly, the most memorable part of my day ended up having nothing to do with penguins. Our tour group's day began with a visit to an animal park, where we got to see characteristic Australian animals such as koalas and dingos. We were even able to take selfies with kangaroos.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
SCUM IS the mild word for the front of the Daily News. I live in New Jersey right near Haddon Township. I knew David Creato killed his son Brendan when it was first reported. But to find out that his 17-year-old girlfriend didn't like kids - so-o-o-o-o he kills his son for her? Just tell the mother he doesn't want to bother with his son anymore, but he didn't have to kill him. That romance wouldn't have lasted, and he would be back with his son again. Now the girlfriend can find another boyfriend, because Creato ain't never gonna see the light of day again!
NEWS
January 11, 2016
Preserve free speech Our new mayor believes "satire is something that's funny, not hurtful" ("Lawyer: City can't censor Mummers," Thursday). Mayor Kenney, satire is meant to puncture balloons, not inflate them. Satire is a form of free speech. As such, the First Amendment protects satire. Free speech can be hurtful, harmful, raucous, ill-mannered, uninformed, brash, insulting, argumentative, nasty, gross, abusive, offensive, rude, and in poor taste. Individuals are free to object to offensive free speech, but we are not free to stamp out speech merely because we find it uncomfortable.
NEWS
January 6, 2016
ISSUE | MUMMERS PARADE Despicable displays I am a native of Philadelphia now living in Brooklyn, and last weekend my boyfriend and I joined friends to celebrate the new year at Two Street, the terminus of the Mummers Parade. What I witnessed along the parade route was nothing short of blatant racism, transphobia, and homophobia ("Brigade punishes Mummer over slur," Sunday). There were white men, young and old, holding placards that mocked Caitlyn Jenner's recent transition.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Staff Writer
WELL, YOU can say this much for the 116th annual New Year's Day parade: It was . . . interesting. Whether you followed along in person, on a phone, or on TV, you probably witnessed some unique moments, from the introduction of new and more diverse performers to a protest march that ended with the arrests of two activists. Collected here are some snippets from a cold, windy morning and afternoon in Philadelphia. The sentimental tug of childhood memories lured Sharon Davis to Broad Street and Washington Avenue, where she sat yesterday morning with a blanket wrapped around her legs.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell and Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITERS
It's a new year, and for the 116th Mummers Parade, perhaps a new era. The iconic Philadelphia celebration Friday featured three new brigades, including two Hispanic performance groups and an African American drill team. One costumed member of the Pirates Wench Brigade, who wouldn't give his name, said he welcomes the new groups and diversity. But he hoped they would adopt the Mummers' history rather than bringing their own. "They're creating a tradition that's not really our tradition," said the man, a veteran of the brigade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2016 | By Felicia D'Ambrosio, For The Inquirer
Here we stand before your door As we stood the year before Give us whiskey, give us gin Open the door and let us in. - Traditional Mumming rhyme It was 1901 when the City of Philadelphia admitted defeat in the face of thousands of years of merrymaking instinct, and officially embraced the spontaneous street music and masquerades that have become the modern New Year's Day Mummers Parade. Mummers officially strut their sequins for the crowds and judges on Broad Street, but once the competition performances and judging are complete, many clubs proceed to their clubhouses on South Second Street - known in the neighborhood as Two Street, and Mummers Row - for a welcome-home party as storied as the official event.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | Daily News Staff
The Mummers Parade may be a Philly tradition that dates to 1901, but that doesn't mean you should expect the same old same old in 2016 — or any year. There's always something new, from the music to the routines and costumes. Last year, even the route was different, as the parade marched down (not up) Broad Street. That directional change continues this year. New for 2016 and stepping off in lead position at 9 a.m. New Year's Day is the Philadelphia Division, a response to criticism that the parade lacked diversity.
NEWS
December 28, 2015
Starts: 9 a.m. on Jan. 1. Route: Begins at City Hall with judging at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard, then continues south on Broad Street to its end point at Washington Avenue. Order of march: Philadelphia Division, followed by Fancies, Wenches, Comics, and String Bands. Also: The Fancy Brigades will each join the parade after finishing its noon performance at the Convention Center.
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