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Paralegal

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NEWS
September 8, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Carter Communication in Springfield has been selected by Professional and Legal Assistants to provide marketing communications and public relations for that company. Carter Communication is a communications agency that specializes in marketing communications, public relations, internal communications, meeting planning and training services for local and national companies. Professional Legal Assistants, at the Victoria Business Center in Springfield, provides paralegal support services to law firms, individual attorneys, insurance companies, financial institutions and corporate legal staffs.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kerri A. Stone certainly fueled the popular stereotype that there's big money in the law. Though only a 31-year-old paralegal at a small Center City law firm, prosecutors say, Stone was able to put down $19,000 to lease a new BMW; $29,300 to rent a summer house in Margate; and $28,600 for a private jet to fly her and some friends to Phoenix for Super Bowl XXX. But prosecutors say Stone's prosperity had nothing to do with her legal acumen....
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 40-year-old paralegal who was hospitalized earlier this month after apparently being hit by a bicyclist in Center City died over the weekend, friends said. Andre Steed died early Saturday after spending more than a week in a medically induced coma, said his former coworker, Sal Guerriero. The Center City law firm where Steed worked, Caesar, Rivise, Bernstein, Cohen & Pokotilow, has offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person who struck Steed, said Guerriero, an attorney with the firm.
NEWS
August 23, 1999 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
You wouldn't have much trouble picking out Doris Biggins at a social event. She would be the one singing the Patsy Cline songs. Or she'd be busy clearing the floor with her elegant ballroom dance moves or her funky jukebox jitterbug jump. "She was a real sociable person," said her Philadelphia lawyer son, Joe O'Donnell. "She loved to sing and dance. "Her last husband was an excellent dancer too. They were only together about five or six years before he died, but that's how they spent a lot of their time - at different dance venues like the American Legion and the VFW posts.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
JULIA PAPAZIAN LAW had been feeling blue about a recent breakup with a co-worker. Law, a dark-haired beauty who was found dead of unknown causes Saturday in a bathtub inside the Rittenhouse Square condo of her boss, prominent defense lawyer A. Charles Peruto Jr., "was at a very vulnerable and emotional time in her young life," her family said in a statement, the Inquirer reported yesterday. Peruto, 58, has said that he and Law were a couple, and described the young paralegal, who would have turned 27 this week, as his "soulmate hippy.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contributing to this article were Inquirer staff writers Amy Rosenberg, Peter Nicholas and Tom Belden; correspondents Blair Clarkson, Scott Fallon, Natalie Kostelni and Raphael Lewis; Miami Herald staff writer Dave Kidwell; and Inquirer news researchers Steve Elliott and Ed Voves
She was not your basic Center City paralegal. She drove a shiny, black BMW and once showed up for work wearing a ruby ring and full-length mink. She hurried the end of her 1993 job interview because she had Phillies tickets that night. Right behind home plate. "I was impressed. I'm a baseball fan," remembers Richard Myers, the asbestos litigator who now regrets hiring Kerri A. Stone on that hot July afternoon. Between 1994 and 1996, federal prosecutors say, Stone took the law firm of Paul Reich & Myers to the cleaners.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Institute, a paralegal training school on Arch Street, plans to close next Friday after 25 years because its owners cannot find a buyer, the school's dean said last night. Ninety-two full-time students are expected to complete their four-month training programs on the institute's last day. More than 70 other part-time students will see their training aborted in midstream, according to the dean, Henry Dantzig Jr. Students said rumors of a shutdown began circulating through the school on Tuesday, when the accounting office informed part-timers that they could not register for new programs.
NEWS
October 25, 2006 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline Eastridge admits that, yes, she is a little crazy. Starting on Sunday, the 46-year-old senior paralegal for a Center City law firm will join 59 other runners in a week-long, 150-mile trek through the sands and dunes and the dry, relentless heat of Egypt's Sahara desert. The event was organized by the sports-adventure company RacingThePlanet. Eastridge will do it carrying only one change of clothing and all the food she will need in a pack on her back that she hopes will weigh no more than 15 pounds.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sensational crime. Suspects in custody. The widespread belief that the guys who did it had been caught. A lack of physical evidence, and the suspicion that officers from a scandal-plagued police department might have made the whole thing up. A grieving mother, watching a jury speedily conclude that the men she believed murdered her daughter were not guilty. For many of those who followed the case, it all felt too familiar. The city residents who gathered at Rittenhouse Square-area bars and coffee shops after the late-afternoon verdict in the case of Kimberly Ernest drew parallels between Herbert Haak 3d and Richard Wise, and one of the century's most notorious defendants.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Wilfredo Santiago is one step closer to being retried for the 1985 fatal shooting of Police Officer Thomas Trench. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court refused Santiago's request to review an order by the state Superior Court reinstating murder charges dismissed by Common Pleas Judge William J. Mazzola in 1992. Yesterday, Assistant District Attorney Hugh Colihan said Santiago's trial could start in six months. "When the record is returned, the speedy-trial rule says we must try him within 120 days," said Colihan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary L. Creekmore, 56, of Drexel Hill, a well-known figure in the Philadelphia paralegal community, died Tuesday, Aug. 5, of cancer in the Vitas Hospice at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby. Ms. Creekmore was a past president of the Philadelphia Association of Paralegals and a board member of the National Federation of Paralegal Associations. She graduated from St. Joseph's University and later returned to her alma mater to teach paralegal ethics. "Ethics was her passion," said Glenn Bennett, her companion of 21 years.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
JULIA PAPAZIAN LAW had been feeling blue about a recent breakup with a co-worker. Law, a dark-haired beauty who was found dead of unknown causes Saturday in a bathtub inside the Rittenhouse Square condo of her boss, prominent defense lawyer A. Charles Peruto Jr., "was at a very vulnerable and emotional time in her young life," her family said in a statement, the Inquirer reported yesterday. Peruto, 58, has said that he and Law were a couple, and described the young paralegal, who would have turned 27 this week, as his "soulmate hippy.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | BY BARBARA LAKER, DAVID GAMBACORTA & REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writers lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
Today on PhillyDailyNews.com :  Read a profile of the life and times and loves of A. Chuck Peruto Jr. from the Daily News archive. FOR JULIA Papazian Law, Friday night was a time to relax alone, watch a Damon Wayans movie and soak in the luxurious tub in the swanky Rittenhouse Square condo of her boss, high-profile defense lawyer A. Charles Peruto Jr., who was her boyfriend of two months. Just after 10 the next morning, a maintenance worker discovered Law, a 26-year-old paralegal, dead, facedown in the bath water.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
FREE-SPIRITED romantic that she was, Julia Papazian Law had big plans to recreate a magical scene from her favorite movie, "Moonstruck. " Law was excited about attending a performance next January of Puccini's "La Boheme," the opera featured in a memorable scene in the film, at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. She especially wanted to see it with her new love, her boss, high-profile defense lawyer A. Charles Peruto Jr. "She wanted to recreate the scene. We were going to dress up, have champagne.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County mother and fake kidnap victim Bonnie Sweeten stole $1.076 million, meaning she could face 10 years in prison, U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. ruled Wednesday. Crossing the $1 million threshold in monetary loss allows federal prosecutors to seek a sentence of 102 to 121 months. A final sentence will not come until next week, when the hearing convenes for a third time. Sweeten, 40, did not speak Wednesday, but in a brief, tearful statement, her father said he could not explain why she turned to crime.
NEWS
December 31, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County paralegal allegedly stole more than $140,000 from families that hired her to manage the estates of deceased relatives, Bucks County prosecutors said Friday. Patricia Ann Fisher, 52, of West Bradford, was arraigned on multiple counts of theft and receiving stolen property Dec. 22, after two Quakertown men reported money missing from their father's estate. Bucks County detectives said they later linked her to thefts from at least three other families. Fisher also allegedly paid herself a total $33,600 for her services - a fee one estate-law attorney described in court documents as "outrageous" under normal circumstances.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
It's the season of giving. The perfect time to celebrate Verdene Randolph. That's because for more than half of her life, Randolph has given of herself. Yet, she's one of those people you'd probably never know of otherwise. Unless, of course, you've lost your job and have been threatened with foreclosure because you can't pay your mortgage. Or you've fallen into credit-card debt and are wondering whether you should file for bankruptcy. Or you're entangled in some kind of custody issue and can't afford to pay one of those high-priced Rittenhouse Square lawyers.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 40-year-old paralegal who was hospitalized earlier this month after apparently being hit by a bicyclist in Center City died over the weekend, friends said. Andre Steed died early Saturday after spending more than a week in a medically induced coma, said his former coworker, Sal Guerriero. The Center City law firm where Steed worked, Caesar, Rivise, Bernstein, Cohen & Pokotilow, has offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person who struck Steed, said Guerriero, an attorney with the firm.
NEWS
October 23, 2009 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At first, those who work with paralegal Andre Steed had nothing but questions about how their friend and colleague ended up alone and badly injured on a busy Center City street one evening last week. Steed, 40, was taken to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with severe head injuries and was put into a medically induced coma to protect him from further injury. His colleagues soon learned that police on the scene of the Oct. 15 incident found no witnesses who could explain what happened.
NEWS
June 14, 2009 | By Jonathan J. Levin FOR THE INQUIRER
Until last October, I had never hitchhiked, much less in rural Mexico. But when I found myself alone and nearly broke in the desert of Baja California - a situation I had willingly put myself into, I should point out - the desperation of the moment seemed to negate the supposed dangers of climbing into a car with a stranger. It ended up being so easy, too. In the remote ranch town of Catavi?a, I had only to wait for about 20 minutes beside Mexico Highway 1 before a husband-and-wife team pulled onto the dirt shoulder and invited me into their hatchback.
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