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Parallels

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NEWS
September 2, 1992 | BY PHILIP ROSEN
In just such a crisis as what is occurring in the Balkans do those of us involved in Holocaust education ask ourselves: "What is the value of such knowledge?" Supporters of the Holocaust Awareness Museum do not believe that the study of the Nazi genocide against the Jews is just an exercise in history. They believe in the dictum of the great American philosopher George Santayana: "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. " The Holocaust was a unique event in human history, because every Jew - regardless of age, belief, sex or what he or she did - had a death warrant place on him or her. Jewish genocide as a crime against humanity was - in duration, intensity and extent - unequalled in history.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | By Ross K. Baker
The candidate of the party in power was being dismissed by journalists as an uninspiring maladroit campaigner and the Gallup polls reflected his high negative ratings. As the vice president of a popular, even beloved, president, the candidate suffered constantly from comparisons to his boss. He also had to defend his administration's record against charges of misrule leveled by the cool and composed liberal Northeast governor who challenged him for the presidency. A scenario of the 1988 presidential election?
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | BY SANDY GRADY
The date - June 27, 1950 - seems so far back in time, it could have been the Ice Age. Harry Truman was in the White House. The Phillies' Whiz Kids were on the way to a pennant. Sugar Ray Robinson was welterweight champion. The big movie was "All About Eve. " Dagmar was the hot bimbo on black-and-white TV. You could buy a new three-bedroom house for $10,000. It was the last time the United Nations Security Council endorsed military force to repel an invasion. Or more bluntly, the last time the U.N. gave Americans a green light to go to war. The parallels are chilling.
NEWS
August 29, 2008 | Carl Leubsdorf
Carl Leubsdorf writes for the Dallas Morning News The parallels between Barack Obama and John F. Kennedy are compelling and suggest a potential path from here to Nov. 4. Those parallels were on vivid display last night when Obama became the first presidential nominee to accept his nomination in an outdoor setting since Kennedy's historic 1960 "New Frontier" speech at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Like JFK, Obama chose an outdoor venue - the Denver Broncos' Invesco Field - to show that his candidacy extends beyond the politicians and interest-group leaders who have dominated the convention proceedings.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In pirate movies - and you may have caught Keira Knightley in a few - the hero or heroine swats away the meddlesome hordes with jaunty strokes of a sword. Knightley, the 23-year-old Brit who's been charming audiences since she big-splashed onto screens as the plucky tomboy of 2002's Bend It Like Beckham, has developed a kind of conversational equivalent to the swashbuckler sweep. Ask her too obvious a question, or one that's been posed too often, and she simply bats it away with a smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline Pardue Goldfinger's new play Slip/Shot, which begins previews Tuesday night, tells the story of a black 17-year-old in Florida, Monroe, who leaves his girlfriend's house one night and, on his way home, is shot and killed by a white security guard. The local sheriff declines to charge the man and closes the case. Goldfinger set her play in 1962, a time of transition in Tallahassee, when Florida State University first admitted black students. But it turns out - as the Flashpoint Theatre Company's cast and crew were jolted into realizing on the day of the first rehearsal - Slip/Shot could just as easily have been set in 2012.
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesus Christ, clad in red-stained white tunic and twisted crown of thorns, was dark-skinned. The Virgin Mary, her face encircled by an azure veil, her eyes red-rimmed and swollen, was a Latina teenager. The two thieves, who died next to Christ on Calvary, were Vietnamese Americans. The crowd, which packed two city blocks yesterday, was a faith-filled mozaic of immigrants from Central America, Vietnam and Cambodia; migrants from Puerto Rico; African Americans and European Americans.
SPORTS
December 6, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
The last time Andy Reid handed over his offense to a rookie quarterback, it was part of a carefully designed plan to develop Donovan McNabb into a franchise quarterback. That isn't the case as Nick Foles takes his place at the top of the depth chart. Nothing about the Eagles looks carefully designed. They have lost eight games in a row and Reid is very likely in his final season - not his first. It is not an ideal environment for a rookie quarterback. That is why Foles' fellow 2012 draftees - especially Andrew Luck, Robert Griffin III and Russell Wilson - have been handled delicately by their coaching staffs.
NEWS
January 22, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The ancient Rome of gladiators and senators, conquering armies and slaves, togas and helmets will be the focus of the next exhibition at the National Constitution Center. "Ancient Rome & America," which will run Feb. 19 through Aug. 1, will consist of more than 300 artifacts and artworks from lending institutions in Florence, Rome, Naples, and 40 U.S. institutions, said David Eisner, the center's new president. The center is curating it with Contemporanea Progetti of Florence and the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities in Rome.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | By DAVID S. BRODER
Historical parallels are always tempting to journalists. Occasionally, they are even instructive. I'm not sure about this one, but it is irresistible to note that as plans unfold for next month's celebration of Roosevelt History Month, Bill Clinton is trying to become the first Democrat since FDR in 1936 to be elected to a second term. That year, too, the Republican challenger was a Kansan, Gov. Alfred M. Landon, the father of Sen. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R., Kan.), who is retiring this year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IN THE FIFTH of a nationwide series of roundtable discussions aimed at improving police-community relations, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder met in Philadelphia yesterday with local law-enforcement leaders and community members. During a brief introduction before Holder's "Building Communities of Trust Tour" forum - a closed-door discussion - Holder, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania Zane David Memeger, Mayor Nutter and Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey spelled out the goal of the discussions and of President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IF WHAT happened Monday with the School Reform Commission's decision to break its teachers contract feels like deja vu, the feeling is not entirely misplaced. It's easy to find several parallels between the actions of SRC Chairman Bill Green and those of his father, former Mayor Bill Green III, who oversaw the biggest teacher strike in Philadelphia history in 1981. First, some background: In September 1981, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers went on strike for 50 days over a promised 10 percent pay raise that never materialized.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai and Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writers
As violence has risen to new heights in Trenton this year, with a record 32d homicide Thursday, the city has drawn comparisons to Camden. But Gov. Christie's suggestion to look to Camden for a solution - replacing the capital's police force with a county force, as Camden did - again met with resistance Thursday. Assemblyman Reed Gusciora (D., Trenton) wrote to acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman, asking that a State Police surge - slated to end in a week or so - remain in place in the city.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
By Cristina García Scribner. 235 pp. $25 Reviewed by Luis A. Gómez The tyrant is now in the sunset of his life, riddled by infirmities and bitter about a revolution disintegrating in front of his eyes. The many attempts against his life and the crumbling of the facade he struggled to maintain for more than 50 years have resulted in paranoia ("in any given twenty-four hours, somebody, somewhere, was plotting to kill him"). He was always an impulsive man, but now he lashes out at everything and everyone around him, including his brother Fernando, a perpetual lackey of the tyrant whom, in his paranoia, he has occasionally suspected of potential "counterrevolutionary thinking.
SPORTS
April 29, 2013
When Jimmy Johnson ran his first few NFL drafts, he used his institutional knowledge of the college game to select the building blocks for Cowboys teams that eventually won back-to-back Super Bowls. The league has changed significantly in the 25-plus years since Johnson made the jump to the NFL, and Chip Kelly is a long way from being mentioned in the same breath. But there are parallels between how the new Eagles coach and former Dallas coach approached their first drafts. Heading into the process, Kelly said he did not do any research on how successful college-to-NFL coaches such as Johnson approached the draft.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Set in 1960s Japan as the country prepares to host the 18th summer Olympics, From Up on Poppy Hill is a gentle, meditative animated feature from Studio Ghibli, the animation house founded by Hayao Miyazaki. The master cartoonist wrote the screenplay and oversaw the project. His son, Goro Miyazaki, directs. It should come as no surprise to anyone who follows the Miyazakis - Kiki's Delivery Service , My Neighbor Totoro , Spirited Away - that the central character in this playfully wistful (or wistfully playful)
SPORTS
December 6, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
The last time Andy Reid handed over his offense to a rookie quarterback, it was part of a carefully designed plan to develop Donovan McNabb into a franchise quarterback. That isn't the case as Nick Foles takes his place at the top of the depth chart. Nothing about the Eagles looks carefully designed. They have lost eight games in a row and Reid is very likely in his final season - not his first. It is not an ideal environment for a rookie quarterback. That is why Foles' fellow 2012 draftees - especially Andrew Luck, Robert Griffin III and Russell Wilson - have been handled delicately by their coaching staffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jacqueline Pardue Goldfinger's new play Slip/Shot, which begins previews Tuesday night, tells the story of a black 17-year-old in Florida, Monroe, who leaves his girlfriend's house one night and, on his way home, is shot and killed by a white security guard. The local sheriff declines to charge the man and closes the case. Goldfinger set her play in 1962, a time of transition in Tallahassee, when Florida State University first admitted black students. But it turns out - as the Flashpoint Theatre Company's cast and crew were jolted into realizing on the day of the first rehearsal - Slip/Shot could just as easily have been set in 2012.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
BOSTON - This city's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum may be as close in spirit as any institution can get to Philadelphia's celebrated Barnes Foundation. While Gardner was a Brahmin socialite who favored Renaissance art and Albert C. Barnes was a perennial outsider drawn to the avant-garde impressionists, both infused their collections with a deeply personal, convention-be-damned sensibility. So, when these compatriots in eccentricity bequeathed their precious art to the public, they did it on their own prickly terms.
SPORTS
January 11, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Maybe the strange calm here can be attributed to Syracuse basketball's position atop the national polls, or to the normal stillness of an Adirondack winter. Or perhaps it's because the Bernie Fine scandal has yet to yield criminal charges, sordid grand jury reports, student riots, or the stunning dismissal of both a college president and an iconic coach. Whatever the reason, nearly two months after several sex-abuse allegations surfaced against Fine, coach Jim Boeheim's longtime top aide and neighbor, the worst of the storm seems to have passed this rusty Finger Lakes city.
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