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Parallels

BUSINESS
January 13, 1987 | By JEROME CAHILL, New York Daily News
These are heady days on Wall Street, with the Dow Jones industrial average bouncing off the 2,000 mark. But can they last? John Kenneth Galbraith, the Harvard economist, is the latest to sound a note of warning. Writing in the January issue of Atlantic Monthly, Galbraith sees some parallels in the current fever that has gripped the Street to conditions that preceded the market crash of 1929. Will history repeat itself? Maybe not to the degree that the '29 debacle crushed the economy.
NEWS
May 12, 2010
By Robert J. Samuelson It is now conventional wisdom that the world has avoided a second Great Depression. When the gravity of the financial crisis became apparent in late 2008, the response was swift and aggressive. Panic was halted. The resulting economic slump was awful, but it was not another Depression. The worst has passed. Or has it? Greece's plight challenges this optimistic interpretation. It implies that the economic crisis has moved into a new phase: one dominated by the huge debt burdens of governments in advanced societies.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nigel Barley is a Cambridge and Oxford-educated anthropologist who turns out to be a wonderfully witty travel writer as well. The British Museum assistant curator's penchant for the funny and informative was evident earlier in The Innocent Anthropologist: Notes From A Mud Hut, which is being published this month in paperback (Owl Paperbacks, $10.95). This is an often-hilarious account of his first year in Africa, which he spent living in a mud motel among a Cameroon tribe called the Dowayos.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The play in which a mysterious stranger invades a lost or sluggish community and proceeds to shake things up is part of a lineage handed down from The Bacchae to The Music Man. Yet in the proper hands, it can still deliver the goods, which is what's happening these evenings in The Sty of the Blind Pig, the 1971 comedy-drama by Philip Hayes Dean on view through May 28 at Freedom Theatre. The stranger in this variation, set in a black working-class district of Chicago in 1956, is Blind Jordan, a sightless street singer who turns up on the doorstep of Alberta Warren, a lonely unmarried woman in her 30s who works as a domestic and still lives at home with her mother, Weedy.
TRAVEL
July 27, 2014 | By Stu Bykofsky, For The Inquirer
TUMON BAY, Guam - It's a tropical island where the streets have no names and the trees have no birds. The place "where America's day begins" (as they like to say), Guam is a Micronesian dot 1,200 miles east of the Philippines, known mostly to those Americans who served in the Pacific during World War II, or to Vietnam-era military who passed through. A U.S. territory since it was ceded after the Spanish-American War, hot and hilly Guam is small (180,000 population) and manageable (30 miles long and 9 miles wide)
NEWS
July 29, 2005 | David Mark
David Mark is editor of Campaigns & Elections magazine and is writing a book about the evolution of negative campaigning The top Republican Senate target is a reviled figure among Democrats. The highly touted Democratic challenger is a popular statewide officeholder, whose conservative stands should appeal to voters beyond the traditional party base. This scenario applies not only to the high-wattage 2006 campaign looming between Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Democratic State Treasurer Bob Casey Jr., but also to North Carolina Sen. Jesse Helms's famously bruising 1984 reelection victory over Gov. Jim Hunt.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
"I'm not a princess in the royal sense," Monica Lewinsky is said to have told the London-based publisher of her book, "Monica's Story. " Well, no. But believe it or not, the former White House intern identifies strongly with the late Diana, Princess of Wales. Monica sees herself "in a similar situation" to the high-profile princess. "Remember, I was in love," she said. "I was trapped, too. I had a lot of pressure on me, and like Diana, I had nowhere to go, nowhere to hide.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It may be geometrically impossible for parallel lines to meet, but the convergence is dramatically satisfying in John G. Young's finely wrought and deeply compassionate Parallel Sons. Young's movie, which won the best-feature award at last year's San Francisco Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, is an original take on a familiar adolescent predicament. Seth Carlson and the rural world he is sentenced to live in are a poor match, and not just because he is gradually coming to terms with his sexuality.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The title character in "Zero Effect," a certain Daryl Zero, fancies himself the world's best private detective. "I always say the essence of my work relies fundamentally on two basic principles: objectivity and observation," he says. To mystery fans, this may sound familiar. "You know my methods, Watson," Sherlock Holmes once said to his trusty assistant. "It is founded upon the observation of trifles. " An objective observer of "Zero Effect" will see that the movie is an attempt to modernize Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective.
NEWS
November 7, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has been a nine-year labor of love for Anthony Giacchino, 36, and he was showing off the near-finished product. His efforts got their first feedback Friday night: a standing ovation from an audience of about 500 who paid $28 apiece and jammed Gordon Theater at Rutgers University-Camden to see his new film, The Camden 28, about a group of Vietnam War protesters who were arrested and put on trial in the early 1970s. "I thought it was very powerful," said Camden Councilman Angel Fuentes, adding that he would try to have the film shown in Camden schools.
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