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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Richard Price finally got around to writing the novel about the Lower East Side that he'd been itching to do for 25 years, he realized that his teenage daughters knew more about the neighborhood than he did. "They knew where the best clubs were, the best hole-in-the-wall clothing shops, and where the Knitting Factory is," says Price, who will read Tuesday from his new novel, Lush Life - a capacious crime story and character study of cultures...
NEWS
July 23, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
You're playing Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 for the 1,473d time. How can you keep the music alive and fresh - with that just-composed feeling? One way, pianist Andr? Watts and the Philadelphia Orchestra showed Friday night at the Mann, is for soloist and orchestra to lose contact with each other and end up at an important arrival point at different times. It's a rare thing to hear in a big, professional orchestra, but it happens, and when it happens it's a harrowing moment.
SPORTS
August 10, 2006 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tucked behind an assistant coach's desk in a cramped office at St. Joseph's Alumni Memorial Fieldhouse, Jawan Carter was talking recently about how his path to Hawk Hill was largely influenced by another 5-foot-11 point guard who was also raised on Chester's hard-scrabble streets, when a sweat-soaked, broad-shouldered figure walked in to take a blow from a pickup game. Carter lowered his head reverentially as Jameer Nelson aimed a friendly barb at him. "He's not full-blooded Chester," said Nelson, the unforgettable St. Joe's guard who was college basketball's player of the year in 2004 before moving on to the NBA's Orlando Magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's no epigram at the beginning of Sir! No Sir!, but if there were, it would be George Santayana's famous phrase: "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. " A riveting documentary about the GI antiwar movement during the Vietnam era, director David Zeiger's look back to the days of Nixon and LBJ and the massive military buildup in Southeast Asia bears so many parallels to the current conflict in Iraq that it's eerie....
NEWS
May 4, 2006
IAM NO fan of Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld - or war, for that matter. But I am a fan of my country, its future and history. Iran is on the same path that Germany was on after World War I. Germany, a proud country, was in shambles. Poverty was everywhere. The people were looking for someone to blame and someone to make it better. They found someone to blame in the Jews, and Hitler promised to fix the problem and make Germany great again. We all know how that went. In the early '80s Iraq invaded Iran.
NEWS
November 7, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has been a nine-year labor of love for Anthony Giacchino, 36, and he was showing off the near-finished product. His efforts got their first feedback Friday night: a standing ovation from an audience of about 500 who paid $28 apiece and jammed Gordon Theater at Rutgers University-Camden to see his new film, The Camden 28, about a group of Vietnam War protesters who were arrested and put on trial in the early 1970s. "I thought it was very powerful," said Camden Councilman Angel Fuentes, adding that he would try to have the film shown in Camden schools.
NEWS
July 29, 2005 | David Mark
David Mark is editor of Campaigns & Elections magazine and is writing a book about the evolution of negative campaigning The top Republican Senate target is a reviled figure among Democrats. The highly touted Democratic challenger is a popular statewide officeholder, whose conservative stands should appeal to voters beyond the traditional party base. This scenario applies not only to the high-wattage 2006 campaign looming between Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Democratic State Treasurer Bob Casey Jr., but also to North Carolina Sen. Jesse Helms's famously bruising 1984 reelection victory over Gov. Jim Hunt.
NEWS
April 3, 2005 | By David C. Steinmetz
No one who has watched Pope John Paul II silently offering his Easter blessing to the Catholic faithful gathered in St. Peter's Square could doubt that the frail pontiff was nearing the end of his life. When he dies, he will leave behind him a church that has undergone changes unimaginable when he was first ordained a priest in Krakow, Poland, on Nov. 1, 1946. In 1946, the dominant model for Catholic faith and life had been set by the Council of Trent in the 16th century. Masses were celebrated in Latin throughout the Catholic world.
NEWS
March 20, 2005 | By Patrick Resta
Mainly I had three different jobs. My main job was running a three-bed emergency room where we saw anybody with anything from flu to gunshot wounds. Then I also went on patrols into the towns, doing law-and-order patrolling. I also went on convoys into camps to pick up supplies. Our forward-operating base was 100 miles northeast of Baghdad and 30 miles from the Iran border. My camp was attacked about two to three times a week the whole time I was there - mortars, small-arms fire, grenades, all kinds of things.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
NHL, good riddance The collapse of the National Hockey League season can be attributed to two simple factors: stupidity and greed. Both have been exhibited by the owners, but first and foremost the blame goes to the players, who display no sense of thankfulness at becoming millionaires by virtue of their physical prowess to play a game. I can react with some amusement to the end of the season, as I could not care less about whether professional hockey is played. The long faces, hand-wringing and angst of those for whom hockey plays such an important role are silly.
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