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Paralysis

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NEWS
November 20, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
He walks purely from memory, his numb steps fractioned into a series of movements called up by rote. Left foot forward 11 inches and slightly to the side, hike the hip, bend the knee, strike the heel. Now the right. Hours before he was to appear at the podium in the Curtis Center on Saturday night to pick up the highest award given by the Philadelphia chapter of the Fight For Sight, Jerry Segal was scoping out the territory. Two steps, no railing. "I think I can do it," he said.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Unless he can quickly raise $270,000, a Saudi man will soon face court-ordered surgical paralysis from the waist down, Amnesty International reports. Justice in Saudi Arabia in the 21st Century still revolves around the principle of lex talionis , better known to Westerners as "an eye for an eye. " The case stems from 2003, when, Ali al-Khawahir, then 14, stabbed a friend in the back. The crime caused al-Khawahir's friend to be paralyzed from the waist down. Finding him guilty in the assault, the court in the town of Al-Ahsa sentenced al-Khawahir to "qisas" - retribution - or pay the victims's family one million Saudi riyals in "blood money.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred Thompkins was once arrested for beating his girlfriend and throwing his wheelchair at her. On another occasion he was taken to a hospital complaining of chest pains suffered while having sex. What's the significance? Well, at the time, Thompkins, 39, was in the middle of litigation against the city and its Prison Health Services and physicians, claiming they were responsible for his paralysis from a minor prison bus accident in 1995. He sought more than $3 million.
NEWS
October 12, 2004 | GARY THOMPSON Daily News wire services contributed to this report
CHRISTOPHER REEVE leaves the world with an enduring example of courage, though not because he starred in "Superman" movies of the 1980s. It is no particular act of bravery, after all, to face bullets when you are bulletproof. It's what Reeve did when he was confronted, cruelly and suddenly, with human vulnerability that gave us all a lesson in heroism. In 1995, on a spring day in Virginia, Reeve was thrown from his mount during a riding competition. He fractured his neck, damaged his spinal cord and was instantly paralyzed from the neck down.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
With a hoist and a sudden mechanical groan, Dan Webb, 44, stands up in the rehabilitation gym at MossRehab in Elkins Park, grinning from ear to ear. You might say standing is not such a big deal, unless, like Webb, who fell from a tree stand while bowhunting in 2010 and suffered incomplete paralysis of the lower half of his body, you've spent a year of your life in a wheelchair. In his case, it's a very big deal indeed. And Webb, of Warminster - who has been working with exoskeleton technology for two years at MossRehab - can do more than stand.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2011
"We're gratified that Boscov's will remain a family business. " - department store chairman Albert Boscov, 81, on the appointment of his nephew Jim Boscov, 61, as vice chairman "I call them the black hole because they suck up everything and nothing comes out. " - Bill Quimby of TollFreeNumbers.com, on Philadelphia-based PrimeTel Communications Inc.'s aggressive acquisition of toll-free numbers for phone-sex services "If this...
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Christopher Prendes, 18, was minding his business at a Miami park when some youths demanded his go-cart, and one pulled a gun. "I was getting off of it, and he shot me in the back," Prendes said. "After I heard the bang, that was it. My legs went numb. "A 15-year-old put me in this chair. " On that November day, Prendes, a high school senior, became part of a dismal trend - a growing number of paralysis cases due to gun violence. Drive down almost any urban street, and you will see them: young men in wheelchairs.
NEWS
January 21, 1997 | By Anika M. Scott, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The family of Marple Newtown High School wrestler Louis Sciotto, alarmed at rumors about their son's spinal damage in a wrestling accident, issued a statement yesterday setting the record straight on his condition. He "suffered an injury to his spinal cord fairly high up," the statement said. "And he will be left with some paralysis. " Doctors are not sure of the extent of the paralysis, but Sciotto is expected to remain at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital for at least several months, said his uncle, Chuck Freels.
SPORTS
August 5, 1995 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Challenges are nothing new to Edward J. Coyle Jr. He had polio when he was 2 years old. For years he went through the rigors of intensive physical therapy and managed to regain full function of all but his right leg, which suffers from residual paralysis. Coyle, of Wallingford, who has his own sports medicine and physical conditioning business, wears a leg brace to help compensate for the paralysis in his right leg. But the paralysis has never held him back. If anything, it has pushed and motivated him. While a student at Monsignor Bonner High, Coyle rowed on the crew team and played football.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
A distraught medical student rushed over to me during a sick clinic usually devoted to fairly benign matters such as colds and minor rashes. "I think something is really wrong with this patient", the student told me. "He can't walk. " The 10-year-old in the exam room had suddenly lost the use of his legs for no apparent reason. His father and uncle carried him into our waiting room, with his mother and aunt by his side. "He was fine yesterday - then, this morning, he couldn't walk," the boy's father told me. I quickly glanced at the child and saw he was coherent and in no apparent pain.
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NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
A distraught medical student rushed over to me during a sick clinic usually devoted to fairly benign matters such as colds and minor rashes. "I think something is really wrong with this patient", the student told me. "He can't walk. " The 10-year-old in the exam room had suddenly lost the use of his legs for no apparent reason. His father and uncle carried him into our waiting room, with his mother and aunt by his side. "He was fine yesterday - then, this morning, he couldn't walk," the boy's father told me. I quickly glanced at the child and saw he was coherent and in no apparent pain.
SPORTS
March 2, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
HIS PHONE buzzed and "Patrick" popped up on the screen. Shawn Cannon already had a pit in his stomach. It was 4:30 last Monday afternoon. It was too early. His son, Patrick, wasn't finished hockey practice for another hour. His fear was confirmed upon answering, when a voice other than his son was on the other end. "It was Shane, my son's teammate, telling me that Patrick got hurt in practice. He didn't say how bad, but I could tell it was serious," Shawn Cannon said. "An ambulance was already at the rink.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
With a hoist and a sudden mechanical groan, Dan Webb, 44, stands up in the rehabilitation gym at MossRehab in Elkins Park, grinning from ear to ear. You might say standing is not such a big deal, unless, like Webb, who fell from a tree stand while bowhunting in 2010 and suffered incomplete paralysis of the lower half of his body, you've spent a year of your life in a wheelchair. In his case, it's a very big deal indeed. And Webb, of Warminster - who has been working with exoskeleton technology for two years at MossRehab - can do more than stand.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Molly was a feisty dog until one day last August, when the 7-year-old puggle's spunk came to an abrupt halt. She vomited once in the morning. Three hours later, she lost the ability to support herself on her hind legs; within an hour, all four limbs stopped working altogether. "She was completely paralyzed and flat as a pancake," recalled her owner, Becky Sitarchuk of Philadelphia. Right away, the Sitarchuks took Molly to the veterinarian near their Lewes, Del., vacation home.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TONY WILLIAMS wasn't about to let a little thing like being paralyzed from the neck down keep him from having a full and productive life. Tony not only overcame his own disability, but he helped others who were also afflicted cope with their conditions. Anthony Eric Williams, an accountant and Navy veteran whose life was forever changed about 25 years ago when he was shot in the neck during a robbery, died Nov. 11 of heart failure. He was 52 and lived in Wynnefield. Former Gov. Tom Ridge appointed Tony to the board of the Pennsylvania Rehabilitation Council, of which he served twice as chairman.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Unless he can quickly raise $270,000, a Saudi man will soon face court-ordered surgical paralysis from the waist down, Amnesty International reports. Justice in Saudi Arabia in the 21st Century still revolves around the principle of lex talionis , better known to Westerners as "an eye for an eye. " The case stems from 2003, when, Ali al-Khawahir, then 14, stabbed a friend in the back. The crime caused al-Khawahir's friend to be paralyzed from the waist down. Finding him guilty in the assault, the court in the town of Al-Ahsa sentenced al-Khawahir to "qisas" - retribution - or pay the victims's family one million Saudi riyals in "blood money.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Darran Simon and Frank Kummer, BREAKING NEWS DESK
A Camden man purposely shot his 11-year-old daughter in the face late Thursday, and the child might be paralyzed, authorities said Friday. The shooting occurred about 9:30 in a rowhouse on the 1300 block of Thurman Street in the Whitman Park section. The girl was in critical but stable condition at Cooper University Hospital on Friday. "It was not an accident. He pointed the gun at her face and pulled the trigger," said Jason Laughlin, a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Jeffrey Goldberg
There's an old saying that liberals will support intervention in a foreign conflict as long as nothing resembling national interest is at stake. If the cause is purely humanitarian - if the refinement of American morality is the only possible benefit - liberals just might back military force to help a starved, invaded, or otherwise oppressed people. Which brings me to the baffling subject of Syria. Like many observers of the Obama administration, I've been confused by its unwillingness to take even relatively modest steps to bring about a decisive end to the regime of Bashar al-Assad.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I find that when someone I care about comes to me stressed out or needing support, I am woefully inept. I am adept at helping out financially or planning out something they need to be done, but if they need me to say something supportive or just be there, I feel empty. I feel myself stressing with them and getting panicky - and if it's someone very much involved in my life, like partner or parent, I feel guilty, like I am responsible.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Freelance
WHEN PRESIDENT Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, many Americans, including some who voted for him, scratched their heads. Only a few years removed from the Illinois state Senate, our newly minted leader had won the Humanitarian Oscar for playing a bit role. He wasn't Bill Clinton, who'd seen the carnage in Bosnia and (finally) used the full force of NATO air strikes to stanch the flow of Muslim blood. He wasn't George W. Bush, who spent millions of dollars to eliminate AIDS in Africa.
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