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NEWS
October 8, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Mayor Nutter took a beating yesterday from one of his closest Council allies over the mayor's efforts to remove paramedics from the fire union on the grounds that they don't fight fires. Councilman Jim Kenney, a longtime Nutter supporter, delivered a blistering speech on the Council floor, asking Nutter to reconsider the move. "I'm asking the mayor as my friend, I'm asking the mayor as the leader of this city to stop this from happening," Kenney said. "We need to hold the line now because these people need our help.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
For the last 10 years, from his vantage as a paramedic, Jaime Pitner of Shamong has seen firsthand the grim toll taken along Burlington County's highways. 'Driving through Burlington County, the traffic has gotten crazy," said Pitner, the supervisor of Memorial Hospital of Burlington County's mobile intensive-care unit. "The growth has been unbelievable. " Pitner's unit is called out during medical emergencies to administer advanced-life-support care. He said the increase in traffic in Burlington County can be a "terrible problem" for emergency squads.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the paramedics in A platoon reported to work at the red brick fire house shortly after 7:30 a.m. yesterday, nobody expected that six hours later they would be engaged in a furious - and ultimately futile - effort to save the life of a Philadelphia legend. But one of the three had an inkling something unusual would happen. During his four weeks as a paramedic trainee at Engine Company 24 in South Philadelphia, rookie Phillip Geliebter had complained of boredom. Yesterday, his partner, Scott Bahner, reassured him it would be different.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The family of a pregnant Fairhill woman who died in 2012 after a fall at her parents' home sued the city Thursday, contending her death and her child's severe brain damage resulted from paramedic malpractice and defective equipment. The suit was filed in Common Pleas Court by Eriberto Rodriguez, widower of Joanne Rodriguez; their 21-month-old son, Xavier; and maternal grandmother Daisy Morales. "My wife should be alive today. My son should be healthy, growing, playing, laughing.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas Court judge Thursday extended until Nov. 1 a temporary restraining order allowing city paramedics to continue receiving health-care benefits from Local 22 of the International Association of Fire Fighters. Judge Paul P. Panepinto ordered the extension at the request of the Nutter administration and the firefighters union, who agreed to continue discussions to break an impasse on the status of paramedics. Panepinto's order, entered last Friday, prevents the administration from shifting about 220 paramedics into the health-care plan that covers independent city employees.
NEWS
April 13, 2002
Paramedics should always take extremely ill babies directly to an emergency room. People who are still breathing and have pulses shouldn't be handed by paramedics over to the morgue. There shouldn't have to be rules about such things. It's just common sense. But after two frightening incidents in the last few weeks, it's possible there is a big gap in paramedic rules and regulations in Philadelphia that needs fixing - and fast. At the very least, paramedics may require reinstruction on the basic duty of their jobs, which is: First, save lives.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
A state court ruled Thursday that about 200 city paramedics belong to the Philadelphia Firefighters Union bargaining unit, a victory for International Association of Firefighters Local 22 and a blow to Mayor Nutter. In its decision, a three-judge panel of Commonwealth Court reversed a decision by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board, which had ruled that the city could separate the paramedics from the firefighters. The two groups have always organized as one unit. The appeals court said the two groups should be able to bargain as one because they have worked alongside each other for decades.
NEWS
March 27, 2008 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
The Philadelphia Fire Department is hard at work hiring paramedics, Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said yesterday. But City Council members considering his agency's annual budget were clearly impatient with the pace, since understaffing has been a significant problem. Mayor Nutter budgeted $3.9 million more for the fiscal year that starts July 1 to help the department hire more paramedics and put more medic units on city streets. Ayers told Council that he is short 31 paramedics now but has the money to hire 80 more, meaning he could hire 111 if his department could find them.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They're in the thick of it. They tend to victims of crashes, help residents flee burning homes and respond to other emergency calls. More than 1,600 people volunteer their time to emergency medical services in Montgomery County. In addition to police and firefighters, many county residents rely on the services of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics. They offer on-call emergency medical care through 39 ambulance services in the county, according to Beth Ann Bittner, spokeswoman for the county Division of Emergency Medical Services.
NEWS
May 29, 2008 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Fire Department paramedics who went to court to get overtime pay won a significant victory yesterday when a federal appeals court ruled they are entitled to overtime pay if they work more than 40 hours a week. The 2-1 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit came in a case involving about 300 fire service paramedics who are assigned to 40 different units at firehouses across the city. The appellate judges sent the case back to federal district court for a determination of damages.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 30, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC SAFETY Take care of paramedics, EMTs The Pennsylvania legislature should amend the Heart and Lung Act to include paramedics and EMTs ("Bill adds to safety workers' benefits," Monday). The act, written in 1935, was intended to provide public safety personnel with full compensation while temporarily disabled from injuries sustained in the line of duty, but it excluded paramedics and EMTs because those job classifications did not exist at the time. In Philadelphia, paramedics and EMTs are considered essential personnel who, like firefighters and police officers, respond to fires, building collapses, explosions, active-shooter scenes, Hazmat situations, and other incidents with mass casualties, such as last year's Amtrak derailment.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Philadelphia firefighters are looking to get their EMT and paramedic peers in the city's Firefighters and Paramedics Union the same disability coverage they enjoy. The Heart and Lung Act of 1935 compels employers of public-safety workers such as police and firefighters - but not EMTs and paramedics - to get their full pay and health coverage during time off for an on-the-job injury. With help from Rep. Frank Farry, a Bucks County Republican and volunteer firefighter, the union, Local 22, is pushing to extend those protections to emergency medical workers, making them "financially whole" while on disability leave.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
THIS KIND of behavior could get a guy killed in New Jersey. NBC News reports that Claudio Bevilacqua , a paramedic who was called to aid James Gandolfini after The Sopranos' star suffered a fatal heart attack in 2013, went on trial Monday in Rome for allegedly snatching the $3,000 Rolex Submariner off the actor's cold, dead wrist. Talk about cold. He could be Tony Soprano's mother. However, it is possible that the watch vanished before the actor collapsed. Possibly from his hotel room.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Most patients don't have heart failure on an empty table, with good lighting all around and nothing to obstruct the paramedics who respond to the 911 call. "My first cardiac arrest was in the backseat of a taxi cab," said Scott Kasper, Virtua Health's assistant vice president of emergency medical services. Virtua's paramedic training program in South Jersey has long prepared students for the real world by sending them out into it. Now it's hoping to bring more real-world complexity to campus.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
The patient was one the medic recognized. She had been to his home more than a few times. He was a diabetic who often slipped into hypoglycemic shock, and his family called medics over once or twice a week. The medic - a veteran with 13 years on the job - and her partner, a trainee, found the patient passed out in the basement. As they treated him, he started to come to. And that's when he reached under his pillow and pulled out a gun. "I'm not going to the hospital," he told the stunned paramedics.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
On a Thursday afternoon in early May, AlDora Sample was gasping for breath. She called 911 a few minutes past 5 p.m. from her home in Camden. But the paramedic squad stationed in the city was tending to a drug overdose, so the dispatcher summoned a team from three miles away, in Pennsauken. At rush hour, it took the medics more than 12 minutes to get to Sample's tan-sided house on Ware Street. Was that fast enough? Emergency medicine experts say evaluating a paramedic service based on its response times is a tricky proposition at best, depending on the type of emergency, geography, and other factors.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
If all goes as ordained by New Jersey lawmakers, six months from now Camden will be served by a fleet of brand-new ambulances and emergency vehicles staffed by paramedics and medical technicians working for Cooper University Hospital. Cooper, a teaching hospital and a designated Level 1 trauma center, was authorized to take over these services in legislation signed by Gov. Christie last week. Will Camden residents needing emergency care be better off? They will be, Cooper officials promise and some EMTs cautiously hope.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two weeks before New Jersey legislators, without debate, voted overwhelmingly to have Cooper University Hospital take over paramedic services in Camden, a state panel of emergency medicine professionals recommended against the move. Two panel members say they and others objected to the plan because it never went through the normal state Department of Health process to vet such a major change. The Virtua health-care system, a competitor of Cooper, has had the job for 38 years. A dozen other members of the New Jersey EMS Council declined to comment, did not return reporters' calls or e-mails, or said they were not present for the vote at the group's quarterly meeting June 10. The advisory group, which includes physicians, emergency officials, and other experts, reports to the Department of Health.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - South Jersey Democrats are fast-tracking a bill that would give Cooper University Hospital control over paramedic services in Camden, currently run by a rival hospital, in a move that critics say circumvents state regulations. Committees in the Assembly and Senate on Monday each advanced the legislation, sponsored by two Camden County Democrats, Assemblyman Gilbert "Whip" Wilson and Sen. Nilsa Cruz-Perez. The legislation, introduced last week, is expected to reach the floor of each house for a vote before lawmakers break for summer at the end of the fiscal year, June 30, by which time they must pass a balanced budget.
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