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Parenthood

ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2000 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesse Green's story is so simple as to be quaint: He falls in love with a single person who has just adopted a child. Except that Green is gay, as is Andy, and together they adopt another child and begin a family. His meditations on the contented single gay man thrust into the disarming and disorienting world of parenthood are found in The Velveteen Father: An Unexpected Journey to Parenthood (Villard, $23.95). It was named one of the best nonfiction books of 1999 by the Los Angeles Times and one of the best memoirs by Amazon.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, a Pennsylvania appeals court has confronted the complex question of who gets custody of embryos, ruling this week in favor of a Chester County woman who hopes to give birth using frozen embryos that her estranged husband wants destroyed. The Superior Court decision upheld a lower court, but ran counter to the small body of national case law on embryo custody. In six other states where high courts have grappled with disputes over frozen embryos, they concluded that parenthood should not be forced on an unwilling person.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The betting here is that Ron Howard's universally appealing and highly enjoyable Parenthood is going to be the hit of the late summer. But there are a few jokes in his serio-comedy of family life that will give pause to some parents and raise some pertinent questions about the criteria used by the Motion Picture Association of America's often (and justly) maligned ratings board. Specifically, the question raised by Howard's comedy - which is rated PG-13 (parental guidance advised for viewers under 13)
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The New Jersey Supreme Court has decided to hear a case involving a South Jersey man's attempt to preserve seven frozen embryos conceived with his now ex-wife. No date has been set, but the attorney for the woman, identified in court papers as J.B., said he expected the court to hear the case early next year and to decide next summer. The woman wants the embryos to remain frozen. Her former husband, identified as M.B. in court papers, wants to use them with another woman or donate them to an infertile couple.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | by Nicky Marone, From the New York Times
Imagine this scenario. Corporations across America with nearly their entire clerical support staff absent and 37 percent of their management gone; small businesses with phones ringing off the hooks and no receptionists to man (or should I say woman?) them; busy male professionals with no one to organize their calendars or keep out pests; sound stages of hit TV sitcoms such as "Roseanne," "Murphy Brown" and "Designing Women" empty and cavernous; movie sets quiet as ghost towns. No nurses.
NEWS
April 10, 2006
JEFF JACOBY made a lot of valid points in his op-ed, "The Obligations of Unwanted Fatherhood. " It's true that certain social, political and economic structures have been put in place that make it a breeding ground for single parenthood. It's also true that, more often than not, women are the ones affected by these structures. So imagine my surprise when I found out there's a guy named Matt Dubay, a Michigan computer programmer, who argues that men should have the same reproductive rights as women.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | BY LINDA WRIGHT AVERY
In the face of complex social problems, it is always easy to fall back on stereotypes and comfortable subjective assumptions that reinforce whatever we want to believe, rather than confronting issues head on, with the determination to seek solutions. So it goes with the problem of teenage pregnancy. Our children are having children "at a higher rate than virtually anywhere else in the industrialized world at an estimated cost to government . . . of over $16 billion annually and at incalculable social expense," according The RAND Corporation.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
For its first half, The Good Father is a gale-force temper tantrum. Furious at his estranged wife, publishing executive Bill Hooper (Anthony Hopkins) is even more furious at his inability to connect emotionally with his son on visitation days. Speeding recklessly through London on his motorcycle, the leather-clad, crash-helmeted Bill resembles Darth Vader. Call him Darth Father. With no outlet for his rage, Bill takes it out on all around him. From the looks of the psychological rubble, Bill is an equal-opportunity deployer.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | BY WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
When I learned that the dead body of Brian Peterson's and Amy Grossberg's infant son was found in a dumpster last month, I felt an overwhelming sense of sadness, not only for the baby but for his adolescent parents. Having experienced the joys as well as frustrations of parenthood, it is difficult to accept any explanation for shaking a helpless infant to death, crushing its skull and disposing of the body in such a merciless way. Anyone who commits such a heinous act must accept the consequences.
NEWS
June 12, 1997 | by Robert Bianco, For the Daily News
Video is the '90s version of the Father's Day tie. Like ties, videos are relatively cheap, readily available, and easy to wrap. And if you're not careful, they're just as likely to end up shoved in the back of some closet. If you want that video to wind up in the VCR instead of the trash, you'll have to put out a little effort. Despite what many boomers think, there is a limit to how many World War II movies World War II fathers want to watch. Nor is it wise to invest in one of those quickly and usually ineptly made videos sports franchises churn out after every league championship - unless your father is a true fanatic, or you're one of the people in the video.
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