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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009
Perhaps it's time for a moratorium on movies where the trajectories of various people intersect, often portentously, across the tableau of a big city. Michael Winterbottom did it with wrenching effectiveness 10 years ago in Wonderland (the city: London). Paul Haggis' Crash connected the dots, and the racism, of Los Angeles. There have been many others, with the lives of strangers and friends, rich and poor, happy and sad, colliding on the streets. And now there is Paris . Directed by Cédric Klapisch with a roving camera and an obvious affection for his town, Paris isn't bad. But like the relationship that takes off between a more-than-middle-aged history professor (Fabrice Luchini)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - It's hard to keep up with David McCullough at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. "I think it's one of the real treasures of the capital city, really of the country," says the 77-year-old historian during a recent afternoon interview, excited as a schoolboy as he walks quickly along hallways, up and down stairs, from room to room. "Here's the painting I wanted to show you," he says, stopping in front of an oil portrait by Abraham Archibald Anderson of a pensive, bow-tied Thomas Edison.
NEWS
November 8, 2005 | By Gwynne Dyer
"Scum," French Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy called the rioters who have seized control of many working-class "suburbs" around Paris every night since Oct. 27, when two teenagers died in an accident that many blame on the police. Sarkozy plans to run for the presidency next year, and he wants to seem even tougher on crime and on immigrants (two separate issues that he regularly conflates) than his main rival, Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin. But his conviction that the policy of multiculturalism has failed has become the new popular wisdom in France, where right-wing commentators refer to the riots as the "Paris intifada" - as if the rioters were all Muslims.
NEWS
December 10, 1986
French Premier Jacques Chirac has been forced to withdraw the university reform bill that sent hundreds of thousands of protesting French students into Paris streets over the past three weeks. The student protests no doubt evoked memories of the student riots in France in 1968 for Mr. Chirac and others, but there was a fundamental difference. To confuse them is to misunderstand the students' anger. Unlike their radical predecessors who tried to topple bourgeois society in the heady demonstration days of May 1968, these young people are afraid they won't be allowed to enter it. The reform bill would have raised the current minimal tuition costs and allowed universities to tighten entrance requirements, which are very loose at present.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By Maria Gallagher, Special to The Inquirer
The question was squarely before me. Did I want a coupe simple, or a coupe transformation? Transformation had a nice ring to it, but when you're talking haircuts - and you're talking them entirely in French - there's a risk that something might be lost in the translation. Marie Antoinette, for example, underwent what could be described as a coupe transformation. So I opted for a plain old haircut. "I think you should go for the bronzage, too," my husband said as we left the salon where I had made an appointment to return two days hence.
LIVING
March 22, 1987 | Special to The Inquirer / PHILIPPE COSTES
Springtime in Paris: A harsh winter, with unusually heavy snows, is abating. People on the streets are shedding their heavy togs for cooler, lighter-weight clothes. But for designers and followers of the fashion world, springtime in Paris means the return of wool, tweeds and fur, for spring is when fall ready-to- wear collections are unveiled. And for hundreds of designers, buyers, reporters and fashion devotees, it is the best time to be in Paris. It appears that French designers, like their Italian counterparts who showcased designs in Milan earlier this month, are calling for shorter skirts and more subdued silhouettes than they did last fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1996 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Paris during the banquet years before 1914, Paris during the glorious decades between the world wars. Glittering city of light, art and love, metropolis of modernism, magnet to avant-gardists such as Ernest Hemingway, Pablo Picasso and James Joyce, who regarded the city on the Seine as their mistress and muse. Alas, this romantic picture, popularized in literature, film and nostalgic memoir, is incomplete. For, as we're reminded in the lovely documentary Paris Was a Woman, Hemingway required the inspiration of American expatriate Gertrude Stein.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2004 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Without warning and with no apologies to Edith Piaf, the Philadelphia Orchestra's first tune Thursday onstage at the Th??tre Mogador was "La vie en rose" in a lovely, lilting arrangement - for four Wagner tubas. The French horn section played the merry prank at a rehearsal, preparing for the first concert of the orchestra's European tour that night. "A little something to make us feel more comfortable playing Bruckner in Paris," co-principal hornist David Wetherill told his colleagues.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 13, 2016
The Mysteries of Paris Eugène Sue Translated by Carolyn Betensky and Jonathan Loesberg Penguin. 1,366 pp. $17.45 Reviewed by Colin Fleming One might not think that a gargantuan Parisian novel, published in 150 newspaper episodes in the middle of the 19th century, would fill anyone's 21st-century bill as an absolute ripsnorter - but Eugène Sue's The Mysteries of Paris does exactly that. Sue's 1,366-page scuzzy epic - a novel of back alleys, hidden rooms, and an underground bar - was a triumph of the burgeoning city mystery genre.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Heroes to pen memoir The three young American men who last summer stopped a terrorist attack on a train bound for Paris will tell their story in a memoir due in August, the Perseus Books Group announced Wednesday. The 15:17 to Paris will recount how civilian Anthony Sadler and two friends, Army Spec. Alek Skarlatos and Air Force Airman Spencer Stone were traveling on a train bound from Brussels to Paris when they encountered a heavily armed ISIS terrorist named Ayoub al-Khazzani carrying an AK-47, a pistol, a box cutter, and hundreds of rounds of ammunition.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2016
Name: www.walkmysteps.com . What it does: The website offers small private tours of Paris with licensed local guides who want to help you discover the city. Available in eight languages. What's hot: The tour size is capped at a number that varies - sometimes only six persons, other times four. Some tours allow as many as 10 people. With that kind of attention, you can be sure all your questions will be answered. One tour might take you to explore the famous sites of Montmartre, as well as its hidden stairs and alleys.
NEWS
December 26, 2015
Fernande Grudet, 92, who under the name "Madame Claude" operated an exclusive call-girl ring in Paris in the 1960s and '70s that attracted the patronage of dictators and diplomats, heads of state and titans of industry, died on Saturday in Nice, France. The news agency Agence France-Presse reported her death Tuesday. Madame Claude's clients included world leaders, executives, actors and playboys - anyone with a boldface name and a deep enough wallet to afford her deluxe call-girl service.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Charles Krauthammer
Last Saturday, President Obama gained the second jewel in his foreign policy triple crown: the Paris climate accord. It follows his Iran nuclear deal and awaits but the closing of Guantanamo to complete his glittering legacy. To be sure, Obama will not be submitting the climate agreement for Senate ratification. It would have no chance of passing - as with the Iranian nuclear deal, also never submitted for the Senate ratification Obama knew he'd never get. And if he does close Guantánamo, it will be in defiance of overwhelming bipartisan congressional opposition.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A week after world officials reached a historic agreement in Paris to limit greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a group of local environmental activists gathered Saturday in Philadelphia to energize each other for the city's role. "It will come down to the local [levels] and states to really lead the way," said Anthony Giancatarino, director of the energy democracy program at the Center for Social Inclusion. "We actually have a huge role to play. " The international agreement gives Philadelphia "a backdrop to be ambitious" in its actions to curb climate change, said Giancatarino, who is also chair of the policy committee at Green Justice Philly.
NEWS
December 21, 2015
ISSUE | ED RENDELL What about Paris? In the wake of 196 countries acknowledging that we need to move away from fossil fuels as a source of energy, it is a bitter pill to read Ed Rendell praising the spoils of fracking in the Marcellus region ("Time is right to develop Phila. energy, container hub," Monday). The climate agreement reached in Paris on Dec. 12 is a much-needed landmark on the road to a sustainable future, but there is much work to be done, and we cannot afford to backslide.
NEWS
December 19, 2015
History, on the "right side" of which President Obama endeavors to keep us, has a sense of whimsy. Proof of which is something happening this week: Britain's last deep-pit coal mine is closing, a small event pertinent to an enormous event, the Industrial Revolution, which was ignited by British coal. The mine closure should not, however, occasion cartwheels by the climate's saviors, fresh from their Paris achievement. The mine is primarily a casualty of declining coal prices, a result of burgeoning world energy supplies.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Less than a month after a terrorist massacre of Parisian concertgoers and cafe patrons seemed to target modern civilization itself, the same city hosted a rare triumph of international order. Defying expectations depressed by repeated failures to reach a global climate accord - as well as the daunting complexity of the issue and competing interests involved - nearly 200 nations signed on to an agreement to limit global warming. The countries agreed to reduce climate-changing emissions enough to keep the resulting average global temperature increase under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, about half of which has already taken place.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER JTomczuk@phillynews.com @JackTomczuk
Almost three weeks after he and his cousin were temporarily barred from boarding a plane for speaking Arabic, Maher Khalil, 28, still is traumatized. "It's like a nightmare," said Khalil, of Northeast Philadelphia. "I feel I'm not free to speak my language. " The men's ordeal not only made headlines, it rang true for other Arab Americans and Muslims. In the weeks since the Nov. 13 terror attacks in Paris, U.S. Islamic organizations and news reports tell of increased episodes of bias, with local police seeing a rise in tips implicating men of Middle Eastern appearance.
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