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Paris Opera Ballet

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NEWS
December 23, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Serge Lifar, who died last week in Switzerland at age 81, dominated the dance scene in France from the 1930s through the late 1950s by dint of being director of the Paris Opera Ballet. He was a prolific choreographer and also an important dancer, whose range of roles extended from the standard princes in 19th-century classics to the title roles in Apollo (1928) and Prodigal Son, George Balanchine's tradition-breaking masterpieces made for Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Although one of the most active figures in dance in this century, Lifar had been known in the United States mostly by reputation - most of it unsavory.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Liberty Weekend rang with "Star-Spangled Banners," to the point that they drowned out "Les Marseillaises" to commemorate the donor. It took a ballet gala on Tuesday at the Metropolitan Opera in New York to help even the score. The occasion was a joint changing of the guard by two world-famous troupes: the Paris Opera Ballet, entering the Met under the direction of Rudolf Nureyev for a season that runs through July 19; and Mikhail Baryshnikov's American Ballet Theater, which has just finished a two-month run there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013
Friday The pipes, the pipes It's martial performance art at its finest: The Black Watch and the Band of the Scots Guards perform at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall, Broad and Spruce Streets. Admission: $30 to $65. Time: 8 p.m. Information: 215-893-1999.   Friday-Saturday Dance competition Reality TV dance shows have nothing on this: The Youth America Grand Prix is an annual worldwide student ballet scholarship competition, open to dancers 9 to 19 and awarding more than $250,000 in scholarships to leading dance schools.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
There is no value in belaboring the point: Rudolf Nureyev danced in three ballets yesterday afternoon at the Academy of Music, and let's just say that he did not serve the art. But more disturbing than Nureyev's performance is the shoddy packaging of the program he is touring in the United States. While the ring of "Nureyev and Friends," as the program is called, has a warm coziness to it, there is no coziness in the fact that his six friends are given no identity other than their names.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Theatrical dance is a migratory art. It has never been dormant, but its headquarters have moved from country to country over the centuries. The dance center of the world in the 1830s and '40s, France is once again a fulcrum of activity, thanks in part to the tremendous hospitality it offered to American modern-dance masters in the 1960s and '70s - choreographers who inspired a young French generation hungry for new forms of expression - and...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
Rudolf Nureyev, the ballet legend with smoldering Tartar eyes and the manner of a grand seignior, performs at the Academy of Music Sunday, with a small concert troupe of European dancers. The show, "Nureyev and Friends," is being billed as the 52-year-old superstar's "farewell tour. " But, exactly who is saying farewell, or why, is, well, unclear. Nureyev himself was emphatic on the subject. "I am not saying farewell," he said in a telephone conversation from Rockford, Ill., where he and his "friends" were performing earlier this week.
NEWS
July 19, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
With the Tricolor flying everywhere in Lincoln Center, music and dance are celebrating the long relationship that this country has had with France. The Paris Opera ballet is filling the Metropolitan Opera House, the Mostly Mozart festival is recalling Mozart's times in Paris and the New York City Opera is spending these post-Bastille days staging French musical theater pieces. It opened Wednesday with Bizet's Les Pecheurs de Perles, a piece with which no one could have anything but a cordial relationship, for it has the innocence of a day at the beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1989 | By Bill Kent, Special to the Daily News
Asked why this production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical "The King and I" had skipped Philadelphia, Gregory Moore, general manager of the Hotel Du Pont's Playhouse Theater, said he didn't know. "But I can tell you this. It's the most expensive production show we've ever brought in," Moore said. "Even more expensive than 'Cats.' " It was easy to guess what drove the price of a touring company production of the Rodgers and Hammerstein's "The King and I" through the Hotel Du Pont's elegant roof, because he was right there, in person, sitting behind Moore with his hands decorously folded, wearing an off-shoulder quilted vest, black patterned shirt, black chalk-stripe pants and patent leather boots.
NEWS
September 3, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Olin D. Kearse, 73, formerly of Blue Bell, who taught ballet and staged dance performances in Montgomery County for more than 40 years, died of complications of diabetes Aug. 10 at a clinic in Alpharetta, Ga. A native of South Carolina, Mr. Kearse was the first male in his family in six generations who didn't become a lawyer. Instead of practicing at the bar, he practiced at the barre and studied dance in Philadelphia while working at a friend's manufacturing plant in North Wales.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011
Repertory Films Ambler Theater 108 E. Butler Ave., Ambler; 215-345-7855. www.amblertheater.com . Back to the Future (1985) $4. 3/26. 11 am. National Theatre Live: Frankenstein. $18. 3/31. Associated Polish Home 9150 Academy Rd.; 215-624-9954. polishhomephiladelphia.com. Colonel Wolodyjowski (Poland, 1969) 3/30. 3-6 pm. Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . Live Simulcast: Paris Opera Ballet - Coppelia . $20; $10 students with ID. 3/28.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Justin Peck, Liam Scarlett, Wayne McGregor, Christopher Wheeldon: They're among the hottest young choreographers in ballet today. And Pennsylvania Ballet will dance their works and more next year in a blockbuster-packed season, artistic director Angel Corella announced Monday. This is the sort of world-class programming that dance fans anticipated when Corella was hired in the fall. "I was incredibly lucky to have danced with all these companies around the world," he said in a recent interview, naming American Ballet Theatre, the Royal Ballet, La Scala, the Australian Ballet, and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013
Friday The pipes, the pipes It's martial performance art at its finest: The Black Watch and the Band of the Scots Guards perform at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall, Broad and Spruce Streets. Admission: $30 to $65. Time: 8 p.m. Information: 215-893-1999.   Friday-Saturday Dance competition Reality TV dance shows have nothing on this: The Youth America Grand Prix is an annual worldwide student ballet scholarship competition, open to dancers 9 to 19 and awarding more than $250,000 in scholarships to leading dance schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011
Repertory Films Ambler Theater 108 E. Butler Ave., Ambler; 215-345-7855. www.amblertheater.com . Back to the Future (1985) $4. 3/26. 11 am. National Theatre Live: Frankenstein. $18. 3/31. Associated Polish Home 9150 Academy Rd.; 215-624-9954. polishhomephiladelphia.com. Colonel Wolodyjowski (Poland, 1969) 3/30. 3-6 pm. Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . Live Simulcast: Paris Opera Ballet - Coppelia . $20; $10 students with ID. 3/28.
NEWS
May 2, 2007 | By Lewis Whittington FOR THE INQUIRER
Choreographer Lisa Kraus isn't worried about selling lots of tickets for the next chapter of "The Partita Project. " Not because she doesn't want people to see it, but because only a lucky 15 or so can attend each of the six performances this weekend at the Mount Pleasant mansion in Fairmount Park, the latest venue of her two-year-old traveling dance-theater "installation. " Previously, "The Partita Project" has been performed, in various forms, at such locations as colleges and cultural centers.
NEWS
September 3, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Olin D. Kearse, 73, formerly of Blue Bell, who taught ballet and staged dance performances in Montgomery County for more than 40 years, died of complications of diabetes Aug. 10 at a clinic in Alpharetta, Ga. A native of South Carolina, Mr. Kearse was the first male in his family in six generations who didn't become a lawyer. Instead of practicing at the bar, he practiced at the barre and studied dance in Philadelphia while working at a friend's manufacturing plant in North Wales.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Theatrical dance is a migratory art. It has never been dormant, but its headquarters have moved from country to country over the centuries. The dance center of the world in the 1830s and '40s, France is once again a fulcrum of activity, thanks in part to the tremendous hospitality it offered to American modern-dance masters in the 1960s and '70s - choreographers who inspired a young French generation hungry for new forms of expression - and...
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The photograph on the cover of the Playbill program shows Twyla Tharp as a little scamp reclaiming her turf. She is in mid-spin, her baggy jacket flying in the wind and her arms flung out as far as they can go. Although her face is dwarfed by a big bowler hat and is barely discernible anyway, a pudginess around her cheek suggests a blithe smile. Yes, as the ads for her New York season have proclaimed, "Twyla's back. " Typical of Tharp, she's back with a vengeance. Heading her own troupe for the first time in five years, she is presenting no fewer than four new works plus a host of revivals during her two-week season at the City Center Theater, which opened Tuesday.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Ballet superstar Rudolph Nureyev and six other dancers will perform at the War Memorial in Trenton on March 11 in a benefit for Har Sinai Temple, Greenwood House and Jewish Family Service of the Delaware Valley. "Rudolph Nureyev and Friends" is touring the United States in what is being promoted as Nureyev's farewell ballet performances. The program includes selections from Don Quixote and Sleeping Beauty as well as Jose Limon's emotional and powerful The Moor's Pavane. Nureyev, 53, was born in Ufa, the capital of the Bashkir Republic in the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
Rudolf Nureyev, the ballet legend with smoldering Tartar eyes and the manner of a grand seignior, performs at the Academy of Music Sunday, with a small concert troupe of European dancers. The show, "Nureyev and Friends," is being billed as the 52-year-old superstar's "farewell tour. " But, exactly who is saying farewell, or why, is, well, unclear. Nureyev himself was emphatic on the subject. "I am not saying farewell," he said in a telephone conversation from Rockford, Ill., where he and his "friends" were performing earlier this week.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The Pennsylvania Ballet has been refused permission to perform Jerome Robbins' Fancy Free, considered one of the choreographer's masterpieces, in the 1990-91 season that was announced this month. Slated for September, the work was to have been a company premiere and a season highlight. The company had announced the work without receiving approval to do it. It also has been refused permission to perform Lynne Taylor Corbett's Great Galloping Gottschalk, which has been in the company's repertory since 1986.
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