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NEWS
September 11, 2010
Thomas Guinzburg, 84, who helped found the celebrated literary journal Paris Review and later ran Viking Press, died Wednesday in New York of complications from heart surgery, his longtime companion, Victoria Anstead, said. A Yale graduate and World War II veteran, Mr. Guinzburg helped launch the Paris Review in 1953 with its legendary founder, George Plimpton, who served for nearly five decades as the magazine's editor until his death in 2003. As one of America's premiere venues for fiction and poetry, the Paris Review has published work by some of literature's great stars, including Philip Roth, Jack Kerouac, and V.S. Naipaul.
NEWS
August 13, 2003 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It was a tough morning for the staff at the Paris Review. This was no mere literary crisis. They had just lost their first softball game of the season to the comic-parody magazine the Onion, and forlorn looks abounded. But down from his office to the rescue came their boss, George Plimpton, wearing his new Boston Red Sox warm-up jacket. Noting that pushovers like the New Yorker and Vanity Fair were still on the schedule, Plimpton offered a strategy. "Everyone in softball hits it to the left side.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
It is a lucky man who can live a life that is the envy of everyone he knows, yet still be liked by everyone he meets. Such a man was George Plimpton, the writer and editor who died last week at 76. Mr. Plimpton had the breeding and bearing of the classic Yankee aristocracy. He was a friend of the Kennedys and a familiar of royalty, movie stars, and Nobel Prize winners. Yet he had nary an ounce of snobbery or arrogance about him. In fact, his special gift was to grasp the secret fantasies of the average Joe. He had the self-deprecatory daring to turn those fantasies into hilarious adventures in "participatory journalism.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
IN THIS AGE of 3-D blockbusters, it's easy to forget that movies are the direct descendants of photos. "The Long Now," an exhibit starting Friday in the Goldie Paley Gallery at the Moore College of Art & Design, aims to illuminate that history. The gallery has been transformed into a traditional theater to provide the audience with an authentic cinema experience. The first piece is Mark Lewis' "North Circular" (2000). The four-minute film is so static at times it's hard to distinguish it from a photo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1993 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a 1959 book review in the New York Times, poet Karl Shapiro belittled Marianne Moore's fascination with baseball, which he deemed an unworthy subject for modernist verse. Shapiro, however, was in the minority. Best known for her urbanely witty animal poems, Moore brought a characteristically keen eye, linguistic precision and odd juxtapositions to both her writing and conversation about the national pastime. Among those dazzled by the results was journalist George Plimpton, himself a rabid baseball fan and author of a bestseller called Out of My League.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nadine Gordimer, 90, who won, among many prizes, the 1991 Nobel Prize in literature, died Sunday at her home in Johannesburg, South Africa. The cause of death had not been released as of late Monday. Ms. Gordimer was most famous for her novels, several of which were written at the height of the apartheid era in her native land. Her writing is widely credited with evoking the conscience of a generation. In novels such as The Conservationist (1974), Burger's Daughter (1979)
LIVING
May 16, 1993 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was a young writer and editor who had just scored a popular success with his first book. She was an elderly, esteemed poet, one of the eminences of American literature. "I just asked her if she'd like to go to a baseball game," recalls George Plimpton. And so began a remarkable friendship and correspondence that lasted until Marianne Moore died in 1972. Plimpton, the witty charmer who edited the Paris Review and pioneered "literary" sports journalism with Out of My League and Paper Lion, envisioned a collaborative work with the aging poet, a book that would combine the exquisite sensibility of Moore's spare, intense poetry with his other passion.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | By Pamela J. Podger, Special to The Inquirer
The first three paragraphs emerged about midnight. The voice erupting from those first words compelled Phoenixville author Jerry Spinelli to write Maniac Magee, a novel about a homeless boy who fosters brotherhood in a racially torn town. Spinelli's sneaker-clad hero has won the author the 1990 Boston Globe-Horn Award for excellence in young-adult fiction. The engraved silver bowl from an Oct. 1 fete in Sturbridge, Mass., graces a wooden table in Spinelli's home, with furnishings he describes as "early garage sale.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's a fireworks freak, this editor of the Paris Review, this celebrity- writer and writer-celebrity, this fast-talking ersatz athlete, this George Plimpton. And he's coming to town tomorrow for what is being billed as one of the most colossal fireworks displays ever seen, a 20-minute extravaganza mounted by one of the premier American fireworks families, and Plimpton's friends, the Gruccis. Plimpton, who wrote an entire book on fireworks, is going to "narrate" tomorrow's display, part of a festival celebrating the bicentennial of the Constitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thank the Lord for basic cable. A show like Monk wouldn't have lasted a full season on the trigger-happy networks. Monk is too loosey-goosey, quirky and unpredictable for broadcast. But this fun, old-fashioned TV pleasure is enjoying a healthy run on USA. In fact, last night the series, starring Tony Shalhoub as the omniphobic detective, celebrated its 100th episode in delightful fashion. The episode's clever show-within-a-show premise allowed for the return of a cavalcade of Monk's most enjoyable guest stars, including John Turturro, who won an Emmy as Adrian Monk's agoraphobic brother.
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NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nadine Gordimer, 90, who won, among many prizes, the 1991 Nobel Prize in literature, died Sunday at her home in Johannesburg, South Africa. The cause of death had not been released as of late Monday. Ms. Gordimer was most famous for her novels, several of which were written at the height of the apartheid era in her native land. Her writing is widely credited with evoking the conscience of a generation. In novels such as The Conservationist (1974), Burger's Daughter (1979)
NEWS
August 24, 2012
IN THIS AGE of 3-D blockbusters, it's easy to forget that movies are the direct descendants of photos. "The Long Now," an exhibit starting Friday in the Goldie Paley Gallery at the Moore College of Art & Design, aims to illuminate that history. The gallery has been transformed into a traditional theater to provide the audience with an authentic cinema experience. The first piece is Mark Lewis' "North Circular" (2000). The four-minute film is so static at times it's hard to distinguish it from a photo.
NEWS
September 11, 2010
Thomas Guinzburg, 84, who helped found the celebrated literary journal Paris Review and later ran Viking Press, died Wednesday in New York of complications from heart surgery, his longtime companion, Victoria Anstead, said. A Yale graduate and World War II veteran, Mr. Guinzburg helped launch the Paris Review in 1953 with its legendary founder, George Plimpton, who served for nearly five decades as the magazine's editor until his death in 2003. As one of America's premiere venues for fiction and poetry, the Paris Review has published work by some of literature's great stars, including Philip Roth, Jack Kerouac, and V.S. Naipaul.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thank the Lord for basic cable. A show like Monk wouldn't have lasted a full season on the trigger-happy networks. Monk is too loosey-goosey, quirky and unpredictable for broadcast. But this fun, old-fashioned TV pleasure is enjoying a healthy run on USA. In fact, last night the series, starring Tony Shalhoub as the omniphobic detective, celebrated its 100th episode in delightful fashion. The episode's clever show-within-a-show premise allowed for the return of a cavalcade of Monk's most enjoyable guest stars, including John Turturro, who won an Emmy as Adrian Monk's agoraphobic brother.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
It is a lucky man who can live a life that is the envy of everyone he knows, yet still be liked by everyone he meets. Such a man was George Plimpton, the writer and editor who died last week at 76. Mr. Plimpton had the breeding and bearing of the classic Yankee aristocracy. He was a friend of the Kennedys and a familiar of royalty, movie stars, and Nobel Prize winners. Yet he had nary an ounce of snobbery or arrogance about him. In fact, his special gift was to grasp the secret fantasies of the average Joe. He had the self-deprecatory daring to turn those fantasies into hilarious adventures in "participatory journalism.
NEWS
August 13, 2003 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It was a tough morning for the staff at the Paris Review. This was no mere literary crisis. They had just lost their first softball game of the season to the comic-parody magazine the Onion, and forlorn looks abounded. But down from his office to the rescue came their boss, George Plimpton, wearing his new Boston Red Sox warm-up jacket. Noting that pushovers like the New Yorker and Vanity Fair were still on the schedule, Plimpton offered a strategy. "Everyone in softball hits it to the left side.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | By Kathy Volk Miller
Endless unfolding of words of ages! And mine a word of the modern - Walt Whitman If you like poetry, the Web is your treasure-trove. There are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of poetry sites. The Internet has changed the world of poetry, possibly for good. Problem: What if there's too much poetry on the Web? Now that the "word of the modern" starts with an e, as in e-poetry or e-zine, would Whitman think, "E-nough already?" I'd like to think that he'd celebrate the democracy of the Internet - but I'm worried about our newfound, instant ability to post and read (virtually)
LIVING
March 24, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains information from the Associated Press, New York Post, New York Daily News and Reuters
Fargo, the dark, comic film about a bungled kidnapping in the Midwest, won six Independent Spirit Awards Saturday at a ceremony honoring independent film in Santa Monica, Calif. The Gramercy Pictures film, up for seven Academy Awards tonight, won for best feature film, director Joel Coen, actress Frances McDormand, actor William H. Macy, screenplay and cinematography. Another Oscar contender, actor-director Billy Bob Thornton, took the best-first-feature award for Sling Blade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What do you get when you mix a Caribbean childhood with a hardscrabble upbringing in northern New Jersey? What happens when your socialization process combines lots of reading, in Spanish and English, with a love for baseball and boxing, a hip-hop sensibility and a gift for keen observation of the blue-collar workers and hustlers who populated an immigrant world unknown to most of America? You get a lot of material for a book. And Junot Diaz, one of the publishing world's hottest young properties, has taken advantage of it all. The 27-year-old writer, born in the Dominican Republic but raised in industrial North Jersey, has caused a sensation with Drown, his first book, a collection of 10 of his short stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Except for its exquisite neatness - perhaps the result of pre-interview spring cleaning, the bohemian equivalent of India being spruced up for Hillary Clinton - Richard Burgin's sparsely furnished Center City apartment fits the part of a literary lair. The one room devoted to Boulevard, Burgin's nationally prominent literary journal that's celebrating its 10th anniversary, is, on this sunny Saturday morning, an IRS auditor's model of the home office. Milk cartons designated for "Ads," "Fiction for Readers," and "Contracts" share space with shelves marked "Rejection Slips," "Acceptance Contracts," "Current Envelopes," and "Old Envelopes.
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