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Park Rangers

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NEWS
January 14, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Protestant minister was put on probation and ordered to steer clear of children yesterday after admitting he exposed himself to young boys in the bathroom of a public swimming pool in Bucks County. W. Mark Bartlett, 47, former pastor of Levittown Wesleyan Church in Falls Township, pleaded guilty in Bucks County Court to indecent exposure and open lewdness. Judge C. Theodore Fritsch Jr. sentenced Bartlett to three years of probation and fined him $1,000. Fritsch also ordered him to complete a county sex-offenders program, to have no unsupervised contact with anyone under 16, and to stay away from parks, playgrounds and other places where children gather.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
After punching a National Park Service ranger in the mouth last October in Independence National Historic Park, Faron Bruce May continued resisting arrest while the ranger tried to handcuff him. Two other rangers were called to the scene and twice fired their Tasers at May, but he continued to wrestle with them. May was finally subdued and handcuffed. May, 31, formerly of Cheltenham, who has been in federal custody since his arrest on Oct. 8, 2009, pleaded guilty in federal district court yesterday to two counts of forcibly assaulting two park rangers.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
I READ YOUR Yo! cover story of May 27 by Donna Williams Vance on colonial-era stories, "The Lure of the Lore," and I was horrified, shocked and dismayed to read the comments of Meryl Levitz, president and CEO of the Greater Philadelphia Tourism and Marketing Corp., in the article. To quote Ms. Levitz, "Wouldn't it be wonderful if all those lost stories . . . [came] to light from people who were trained, devoted and enthusiastic about telling them?" Well, Ms. Levitz, I can only assume that you haven't visited Independence National Historical Park in more than a half-century.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Mary Gagnier, Special to The Inquirer
In a landscape filling fast with houses, office buildings and stores, Tyler State Park remains a patch of thriving green. "We're like the oasis in the desert, except our desert is nothing but developments," said John Costello, a Tyler ranger since 1981, about the 1,700-acre park in Newtown Township. The park provides a refuge and a respite from suburban sprawl for an estimated 800,000 visitors a year. But some of those visitors bring into the park the familiar problems of the world outside: alcohol abuse, drugs, and burglaries.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Applications for the the new Philadelphia Ranger Corps - which will do in the 8,700-acre Fairmount Park system what park rangers do in national parks - are already rolling in from recent high school graduates, Alexander L. Hoskins, the park's executive director, said after a Fairmount Park Commission meeting yesterday. Nearly 300 people across the nation have applied for the position of executive director of the corps, which is about to be created by the commission through a $1 million program being funded by the William Penn Foundation.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | By Jake Wagman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It started with a fracas at a softball game. Three years and several lawsuits later, the Gloucester County park rangers have gotten what they wanted: They have earned police powers, and perhaps a little more respect. Until nearly two weeks ago, when they graduated from the county's police academy, the rangers saw their mission as a paradox. They were assigned to protect county parks, but they had no official police training. When they saw trouble happening, the most they could do was take notes and call police.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
AN ANTI-ABORTION protester arrested for refusing to move to another spot on Independence Mall in 2007 can't collect damages from two park rangers who detained him, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday. The three-judge panel upheld a 2011 lower court ruling to dismiss a lawsuit that Michael Marcavage had brought against Independence National Historic Park rangers Alan Saperstein and Ian Crane. The lawsuit stemmed from an October 2007 protest on the sidewalk near the entrance to the Liberty Bell Center, at 6th and Chestnut.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
They won't carry guns and they won't ride horses, but their wide-brimmed Smokey the Bear hats will identify them as park rangers: the urban - not the forest - variety. About 40 such rangers - members of the Philadelphia Ranger Corps - are expected to start working for the Fairmount Park Commission in the spring, directing visitors to park attractions and traveling to city classrooms to offer students information about the park. The rangers' training, which includes a two-year course at Temple University, and their duties were described during a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer
The fledgling Philadelphia Ranger Corps, formed to train young people to serve as Fairmount Park rangers, received almost $10 million from the William Penn Foundation yesterday. The grant will fund the non-profit program through at least its first three years. "It's seed money," said corps executive Peter Engbretson yesterday, "to set up a model program. " The corps, formed in November, will have no law enforcement powers. Instead, rangers will serve as interpreters and conservators of the park, offering tours and directions and educating visitors in historical and natural facts about the sprawling 8,700-acre system.
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Thinking of packing the family off for a day of picnicking and lazy frolicking at a nearby national park to celebrate the Memorial Day weekend summer kick-off? Don't forget to bring your own toilet. And picnic table. And compass. That's because national parks, hit hard by the harsh winter, are fighting a tight budget squeeze from Congress, making it tough for them to pay for upkeep and new rangers. Local park managers complain that employee and maintenance costs have risen, but their budgets have stayed the same.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LOVE PARK RANGER Erron Williams testified in court last week that he did nothing to provoke a skateboarder's violent attack on him last month. And as Curtis Tanner's punches and kicks rained down on him, Williams said, he did nothing to return the violence. A tourist's video that showed Williams collapsed on the ground, trying to ward off kicks to his shoulder and head, went viral after the Aug. 15 beating. "I'm not trying to have no confrontation," Williams testified yesterday during Tanner's preliminary hearing for aggravated assault and related offenses.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writerdifilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
The skateboarding punk caught on video beating a city park ranger last month is a jobless convicted robber who has a long rap sheet and a history of fighting, according to court testimony and records. Curtis Tanner, 19, of Pottstown, "definitely is in a downward spiral," said Assistant District Attorney Joseph Whitehead, as he pleaded yesterday with a judge to add $100,000 to Tanner's $250,000 bail. But Philadelphia Municipal Judge Nazario Jimenez Jr. instead cut bail to $10,000, which is more in line with bail guidelines, saying: "He's not Al Capone.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police are investigating reports that a skateboarder beat a ranger in LOVE Park on Friday as others stood by and laughed. Details were made public over the weekend after a witness posted a video of the attack on the Internet. The confrontation began just before 5:30 p.m. Friday, police said, when a Philadelphia Parks and Recreation ranger approached a group of skateboarders and told them skateboarding was not permitted in the park at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard, a popular spot with tourists for picture-taking.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - For a moment, the line was quiet. As the sun beat down on the field, a row of men dressed in gray adjusted muskets, hoisted flags, and wiped sweat from their foreheads. Then, with a whoop, they were off across the field, followed by ranks and ranks behind them. But the majority of the crowd sprinting across the battlefield Wednesday afternoon was decidedly and defiantly anachronistic: middle-aged men in T-shirts, children riding on parents' shoulders, young women in sundresses, and more than a few amateur photographers with cellphone cameras.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The reopening this summer of the Benjamin Franklin Museum in Old City may be postponed because of the federal budget cuts known as the sequester. Initially opened in 1976, then closed in 2011, the museum celebrating Philadelphia's Great Man was supposed to be ready for the summer tourist season after a $23.1 million modernization. But because of a hiring freeze brought on by the sequester, the National Park Service may not have enough people to staff the museum, still being rebuilt and updated.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
CARLOS J. BALSAS apparently has a thing for state and national monuments. A former Arizona State University professor and urban planner, he led a movement to revitalize Arizona's aged and decrepit state Capitol. But on Saturday, when Balsas, 41, of Tempe, Ariz., came to the Liberty Bell Center, preservation was the furthest thing from his mind. About 10:05 a.m., a security officer told Balsas that he had to check his bags. While security personnel examined his backpack, Balsas said, "I have explosives in there," according to police.
NEWS
September 12, 2012
By Paul Decker Even after more than 30 years of selling the tourist attractions of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and, most recently, Valley Forge and Montgomery County, I still wonder at the natural and historical treasures of our national parks. Think Independence and Valley Forge National Historical Parks, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, the breathtaking Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area in the Poconos, and the sobering Gettysburg National Military Park. There are few places more beautiful, historic, or inspirational than these.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
AN ANTI-ABORTION protester arrested for refusing to move to another spot on Independence Mall in 2007 can't collect damages from two park rangers who detained him, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday. The three-judge panel upheld a 2011 lower court ruling to dismiss a lawsuit that Michael Marcavage had brought against Independence National Historic Park rangers Alan Saperstein and Ian Crane. The lawsuit stemmed from an October 2007 protest on the sidewalk near the entrance to the Liberty Bell Center, at 6th and Chestnut.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com215-854-2656
An antiabortion protester who was arrested for refusing to move to another spot on Independence Mall in 2007 can't collect damages from two park rangers who detained him, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled Thursday. The three-judge panel upheld a 2011 lower-court ruling to dismiss a lawsuit Michael Marcavage brought against Independence National Historic Park rangers Alan Saperstein and Ian Crane. The lawsuit stemmed from an October 2007 protest on the sidewalk of 6th Street near the entrance to the Liberty Bell Center at Chestnut.
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