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Parking Enforcement Officer

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NEWS
July 3, 2015
IT BEGAN Jan. 30 with what a Parking Enforcement Officer wrote up as a "stop prohibited" violation for 38-year-old Brian Carroll. It seemed bogus. It ended Tuesday morning when the Bureau of Administrative Adjudication threw out the ticket on a technicality. "It's a win, but the lowest level of win," says Carroll, happy with the victory but disappointed the hearing examiner didn't ask for his carefully assembled evidence. That evidence didn't carry his first appeal, which he filed by email on Feb. 24, a day after receiving notification of the violation.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The head of the Philadelphia Parking Authority said yesterday that a senior aide did nothing improper in November when he called the District Attorney's Office and asked that additional charges be filed against a man in an alleged assault on a parking-enforcement officer. William L. Rafsky, the authority's chairman and executive director, strongly defended Vincent J. Fenerty Jr. at a meeting of the agency's board, adding later in an interview, "It seems to me that what he did was absolutely in line with his duties.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ticket writers of the Philadelphia Parking Authority have been feeling put upon by motorists who do not appreciate their work. They have been shouted at and shoved, cursed and assaulted. Yesterday, about 70 of the 151 enforcement officers assembled at Parking Authority headquarters at Broad and Callowhill Streets to get a pep talk from the boss, Wilson Goode. They cheered when the mayor said he would back a law that would make it a serious crime to assault them, and they listened quietly when he told they had a duty to treat motorists in a courteous and professional manner.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
The Phoenixville Police Department has gotten permission from Borough Council boost its force to 23 officers. The council decided last year to create two new entry-level patrol positions for the understaffed department and had directed the borough's Civil Service Commission to draw up a list of eligible candidates. At their Tuesday night meeting, the members voted, 11-0, with councilwoman Mary Ellen Sierzega absent, to add a third new patrol position by replacing a part-time parking enforcement officer with another full-time police officer.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Ten-month-old Fareed Hearn remained in critical condition at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia yesterday, struggling to survive the stab wounds inflicted by his mother. The infant was stabbed five to seven times in the chest and abdomen Thursday when his mother, Ramona Gibbs, picked up a kitchen knife in her East Falls apartment and plunged it into her two children. Fareed's 10-year-old sister, Sakinah Hearn, was reported to be in fair condition at Children's. She was cut in the hands and suffered superficial wounds to her neck and back.
NEWS
June 9, 2006
FEW THINGS irritate us more than drivers who double park right next to an open parking space. Like, just how lazy can you be? So we give five enthusiastic honks of the horn to the Philadelphia Parking Authority's proposal to raise fines for double parking, expired meters and other violations. The increases, $25 for an expired meter, $50 for double parking, $100 for parking on access roads such as those near Philly International, will generate extra revenue and encourage drivers, especially those in Center City, to park in a garage, rather than hog the on-street meters all day. In some areas, it was cheaper to eat a ticket than park in a garage.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Darby Borough Council has voted, 5-3, to put part-time Police Officer Con Cassidy - a Republican candidate for Yeadon Borough Council - back on the duty schedule. Democratic Mayor Charles Sanders had removed Cassidy from the schedule, charging that Cassidy's political activity was in violation of the borough code. At the council's meeting Wednesdaynight, Darby Borough Solicitor Peter Nolan said the part-time officer was not regulated by civil service provisions. Nolan said he saw no prohibition against a part-time officer exercising his right to engage in political activity where he lived.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2006 | By Rebecca Carroll FOR THE INQUIRER
Snow day. For children, it means no school, snowmen and sledding. For working parents, it can mean panic and dread. When Rose Smith, a parking enforcement officer who lives in South Philadelphia, found out that school was canceled yesterday morning, her thoughts immediately went to her 12-year-old niece, who lives with her. "I thought, what was I going to do with her? I couldn't leave her at home," Smith recalled. Smith's niece, Myranda Smith, a seventh grader at Vare Middle School, stayed at a neighbor's house while her aunt worked.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A former borough constable who was removed from office in 1995 after his conviction for indecent assault while on duty is vying to get his old job back. Anthony Spano, 61, is on the November ballot as a nonpartisan candidate for constable, having gathered the required 125 signatures on a nomination petition, said officials at the Delaware County Bureau of Election. Spano could not be reached for comment yesterday. He was removed from office in July 1995 by Judge Anthony R. Semeraro, who sentenced him to six to 12 months of house arrest and community service.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
For years, people in South Philly complained that their streets were dirty. And they asked, Why can't we have street sweepers, like other parts of the city? Recently, the sweepers have been making their way to some South Philadelphia neighborhoods. And some people are sorry they ever asked. Here's a South Philly street scene on a recent Tuesday. PLACE: Intersection of 8th and Alter streets, and Passyunk Avenue, just off the Italian Market. TIME: 12:05 p.m. PLAYERS: Gennaro Molinari, owner of Authorized Motor Service, one of his employees; Jim Beem and Mark Christopher, of nearby Christopher's Auto Parts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2015
IT BEGAN Jan. 30 with what a Parking Enforcement Officer wrote up as a "stop prohibited" violation for 38-year-old Brian Carroll. It seemed bogus. It ended Tuesday morning when the Bureau of Administrative Adjudication threw out the ticket on a technicality. "It's a win, but the lowest level of win," says Carroll, happy with the victory but disappointed the hearing examiner didn't ask for his carefully assembled evidence. That evidence didn't carry his first appeal, which he filed by email on Feb. 24, a day after receiving notification of the violation.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
FORGET THE World Cup. Forget the Phillies. (Really.) Forget the Sixers. (Please.) Philadelphia owns a world record. The Philadelphia Parking Authority ticketed a motorist for "meter expired" even before he got out of his car. Here's what happened, according to ticketee Brian Yan: It was about 11 a.m. July 10, and he had dropped his girlfriend off on Arch Street near 22nd. He turned onto 22nd and pulled his white 2010 Ford Taurus into a parking space to get a cup of coffee.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHEN MEDICAL students become doctors, they take an oath to do no harm to those who cross their paths. The promise recognizes the power that medical folks have to muck up a person's day. You know who needs to make a similar pledge? The jerks at the Philadelphia Parking Authority. If they swore to wield their power with reasonableness and respect for the public, a Good Samaritan named George Echenhofer never would have been punished for being the kind of decent citizen this city needs more of. How infuriating was his treatment by PPA?
NEWS
March 2, 2008
What job is more strenuous and prone to injury in Philadelphia: fighting fires, walking the police beat, or writing parking tickets? According to workers' compensation claims it would appear that being a meter maid, er, parking enforcement officer, is dangerous to your health. As detailed last week in The Inquirer, employees at the Philadelphia Parking Authority file workers' comp claims about twice as often as city firefighters or police officers. The PPA spends far more on settling workplace-injury claims: $1,558 per employee, compared with $833 for the average claim in the Police Department.
NEWS
June 9, 2006
FEW THINGS irritate us more than drivers who double park right next to an open parking space. Like, just how lazy can you be? So we give five enthusiastic honks of the horn to the Philadelphia Parking Authority's proposal to raise fines for double parking, expired meters and other violations. The increases, $25 for an expired meter, $50 for double parking, $100 for parking on access roads such as those near Philly International, will generate extra revenue and encourage drivers, especially those in Center City, to park in a garage, rather than hog the on-street meters all day. In some areas, it was cheaper to eat a ticket than park in a garage.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2006 | By Rebecca Carroll FOR THE INQUIRER
Snow day. For children, it means no school, snowmen and sledding. For working parents, it can mean panic and dread. When Rose Smith, a parking enforcement officer who lives in South Philadelphia, found out that school was canceled yesterday morning, her thoughts immediately went to her 12-year-old niece, who lives with her. "I thought, what was I going to do with her? I couldn't leave her at home," Smith recalled. Smith's niece, Myranda Smith, a seventh grader at Vare Middle School, stayed at a neighbor's house while her aunt worked.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
For years, people in South Philly complained that their streets were dirty. And they asked, Why can't we have street sweepers, like other parts of the city? Recently, the sweepers have been making their way to some South Philadelphia neighborhoods. And some people are sorry they ever asked. Here's a South Philly street scene on a recent Tuesday. PLACE: Intersection of 8th and Alter streets, and Passyunk Avenue, just off the Italian Market. TIME: 12:05 p.m. PLAYERS: Gennaro Molinari, owner of Authorized Motor Service, one of his employees; Jim Beem and Mark Christopher, of nearby Christopher's Auto Parts.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A former borough constable who was removed from office in 1995 after his conviction for indecent assault while on duty is vying to get his old job back. Anthony Spano, 61, is on the November ballot as a nonpartisan candidate for constable, having gathered the required 125 signatures on a nomination petition, said officials at the Delaware County Bureau of Election. Spano could not be reached for comment yesterday. He was removed from office in July 1995 by Judge Anthony R. Semeraro, who sentenced him to six to 12 months of house arrest and community service.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Staff writer Larry Fish contributed to this article
Last week, City Council voted to hold parents responsible for the actions of their children. This week, it wants to hold car owners responsible for the actions of their vehicles. It would work like this: You lend your 1997 Porsche to your coworker. Coworker gets a ticket for running a red light. No car stop is made to obtain information from the driver. Instead, a ticket is written to the car owner. In other words, tickets for moving violations would be written against the license plate of the car, not the driver's license of the operator.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Ten-month-old Fareed Hearn remained in critical condition at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia yesterday, struggling to survive the stab wounds inflicted by his mother. The infant was stabbed five to seven times in the chest and abdomen Thursday when his mother, Ramona Gibbs, picked up a kitchen knife in her East Falls apartment and plunged it into her two children. Fareed's 10-year-old sister, Sakinah Hearn, was reported to be in fair condition at Children's. She was cut in the hands and suffered superficial wounds to her neck and back.
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