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NEWS
March 12, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Surgery to transplant embryonic cells into the brains of Parkinson's disease sufferers - an experimental procedure that has outraged some critics - may be less promising than once thought, researchers reported in last week's New England Journal of Medicine. In tests on 40 volunteers, researchers found that patients over age 60 who received the transplanted brain cells fared no better than people whose skulls were drilled into, but who were not given the transplanted cells. Most people who suffer from Parkinson's, a neurological disease, are over 60. Critics of using such cells, harvested from discarded human embryos, include the Vatican, which has called the research "gravely immoral.
SPORTS
November 17, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
GREEN BAY Packers great Forrest Gregg, a man celebrated for his durability on the football field, is facing a difficult challenge away from the gridiron. Nicknamed "Iron Man" for playing in a then-record 188 consecutive NFL games during his Hall of Fame career as an offensive lineman, Gregg has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of the debilitating neurological disorder is unknown, Gregg, his family and his neurologist say his disease may be related to numerous concussions he suffered during his playing career in the 1950s at SMU and from 1956-71 with the Packers and Dallas Cowboys.
SPORTS
October 28, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
TEXAS A & M basketball coach Billy Kennedy said yesterday that he is in the early stages of Parkinson's disease. Kennedy, 47, took a leave of absence from the team earlier this month to undergo testing after experiencing neck and shoulder pain for several months that led to an inability to sleep regularly. The tests revealed that Kennedy was in the early stages of Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. "I am heeding the advice of my doctors and addressing the disease and its symptoms," Kennedy said in a statement.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Every Tuesday, Domenic Lanciano, 60, and his daughter, Nicole, 34, go to dance class. Their goal isn't to dazzle relatives at the next family wedding or sharpen their skills for a spin on Dancing With the Stars. Domenic has Parkinson's disease, and doctors have suggested the rhythms of dance may help keep him loose and limber. He and Nicole have been going to classes for the last five months, joining 25 or so Parkinson's patients who every week shimmy and sway in Studio A at West Chester's Rock School West.
NEWS
June 6, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Mark Helms, the tremors of Parkinson's disease became so bad eight years ago that he was having difficulty doing the most basic things - brushing his teeth, shaving, or holding a cup of coffee. Then the 60-year-old former radio news director underwent surgery to have two electrodes implanted in his brain and attached by wires to battery-powered electric stimulators in his chest. The procedure, known as deep brain stimulation, or DBS, was performed by neurosurgeon Gordon Baltuch at Pennsylvania Hospital.
SPORTS
February 28, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Arizona coach Lute Olson labeled speculation that he has Parkinson's disease "a vicious, vicious rumor" that is "totally false. " The 72-year-old coach brought up the subject at his weekly news conference yesterday. "I have gotten some calls about rumors and certain radio stations running some things about me having Parkinson's, which is a complete lie," Olson said. "I have physicals like everyone else does. There is absolutely no medical indication of any type of problem.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, medical researchers have something nice to say about something millions of us actually like: coffee. A study in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association concludes that coffee drinkers are less likely to get Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurological ailment that affects 3 percent of people over 65. Researchers, who began studying more than 8,000 Japanese American men 35 years ago, found that those who...
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
After the transplanting of gland tissue into their brains, two men with severe Parkinson's disease showed striking improvement - one recovering enough to walk without help and get a job, according to a new report. The report marks "an important event in the history of treatment of Parkinson's disease," said an editorial accompanying the report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. However, experts said that further testing was necessary, that no one knew how long the improvements in the transplant patients would last and that such surgery posed hazards for the elderly people who are the bulk of Parkinson's patients.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Michael J. Fox - leaping into the Hudson River on a recent episode of "Spin City," bubbly as ever for his last charming visit to "The Rosie O'Donnell Show" - has Parkinson's disease. How could we not know? "It's not that I had a deep, dark secret," Fox, 37, tells the new People magazine. "It was just my thing to deal with.' The hockey-playing sitcom star said, incredibly, that he was first diagnosed with the disease seven years ago, after he noticed a recurring "twitch" in his left hand.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once a week for more than a decade, Robert L. Powell Jr. went to art classes at the Haddonfield Adult School. And until the last few weeks of this spring semester, he took classes in watercolor painting with Gwynn Walker Di Pilla. "A lot of his pictures were for his children and his grandchildren," Di Pilla said, including his final work, an incomplete still life of flowers for the youngest, 6-month-old Emily Ford. "I will finish it up for him," she said. Painting was a refuge from Parkinson's disease, she said, because "when he painted, he did not shake at all. " On Friday, June 19, Mr. Powell, 69, of Haddon Heights, who retired three years ago as a professor of business studies at what is now Rowan College at Gloucester County, died of complications of Parkinson's disease at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William T. Pfeffer, 65, of Somerdale, who owned and operated Chatham Communications, a telephone services firm in Bellmawr, from 1981 until it was sold in 2007, died of Parkinson's disease Thursday, Oct. 16, at his home. Born in Camden, Mr. Pfeffer graduated from Collingswood High School in 1967, where he won medals while on the wrestling team, daughter Jennifer Campbell said. After serving in the Navy, Mr. Pfeffer was a lineman for New Jersey Bell Telephone Co. in the 1970s, she said.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is suing a Camden nonprofit, saying it compromised nearly 26,000 research tubes when a freezer door was left open in March. The tubes of blood and other fluids were stored at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research along Haddon Avenue, and would have been used to study the causes of Parkinson's disease, according to the lawsuit. It was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey. Fox's foundation, according to the suit, signed two contracts - one in 2010, the other 2011 - worth a combined $4.3 million to store the tubes at Coriell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
"TOP CHEF" VICTOR Nick Elmi is set to fight Parkinson's disease under the banner "Team Elmi's Dads. " The name, he admitted, makes him giggle a little bit. "It looks like I was raised by two dads," said Elmi, the owner of South Philly's Laurel (1617 E. Passyunk Ave.). Elmi is instead referring to his dad and his stepfather, both of whom suffer from Parkinson's disease. Elmi and his restaurant employees plan to walk in Moving Day: A Walk to Stamp Out Parkinson's on Oct. 11 (go to movingdayphilly.org )
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even before they are diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, many patients suffer from depression and anxiety. These psychiatric problems may actually be early symptoms of what many see as primarily a movement disorder, said Daniel Weintraub, a Penn Medicine geriatric psychiatrist, who studies the psychiatric and cognitive complications of Parkinson's. "People with a midlife history of depression or anxiety," he said, "are at subsequent increased risk of developing Parkinson's. " Over the last 10 years, Weintraub said, researchers have placed increasing emphasis on "nonmotor" aspects of the disorder, which is best known for causing tremors.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Robert Nelson McIntyre, 89, of Doylestown, a pastor in the Reformed Episcopal Church, died Thursday, July 3, of Parkinson's disease at his home. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from Northeast High School in 1942 and attended Philadelphia College of the Bible and Temple University. He graduated from the Reformed Episcopal Theological Seminary in 1956. Mr. McIntyre joined the Navy in 1943 and served in the Pacific. His military discharge papers show that he trained at various naval stations before being assigned to a flight crew.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Parkinson's patient Lori Katz, 60, is whipping a jump rope around her head as she calls out words beginning with the letter B. At the ready nearby: a heavy weight bag that Katz will attack later in her workout - before donning boxing gloves to match mitts with her physical therapist, Joellyn Fox. "Go, go, go!" Fox screams as Katz nimbly steps from one set of colored circles to the next, landing punches against her therapist's gloved hands. "Orange! Green! Red!" Fox is a whirling dervish of energy and encouragement.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce S. Parkinson 86, of Audubon, a longtime golfer and tournament official, who volunteered his services during the 2013 U.S. Open at Merion, died Friday, March 21, of complications from a metabolic disorder at Lankenau Hospital. A Golf Association of Philadelphia volunteer for nearly four decades, Mr. Parkinson would be out weekends officiating in tournaments for players at all skill levels. In 2009, the group honored him for his service with the Distinguished Service Award. In June 2013, he was captain of the marshals for the 14th hole during the U.S. Open in Merion.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Dr.William B. McNamee Jr., For The Inquirer
Her three sisters brought her to the emergency room at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. For the last month she had been having increasing problems with thinking and she could no longer walk on her own. One month before, she was living independently with her daughter in Virginia, but now she looked to her sisters a lot like their elderly mother who died a few years ago of Alzheimer's disease. How could this happen almost overnight? In the emergency room, her vital signs were normal and she could tell the doctors the right place, month, and year.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
QR Pharma is a five-year-old start-up company based in Berwyn, but the young firm has been able to connect with well-known people and groups as it seeks funding to make drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In 2012, QR Pharma got $468,000 from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research to explore a compound called Posiphen as a potential treatment for Parkinson's. This grant is for work that will be led by Robert Nussbaum of the University of California, San Francisco, and Jack T. Rogers, an associate professor of psychiatry at the genetics and aging research unit of Massachusetts General Hospital.
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