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Parkinson

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NEWS
March 12, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Surgery to transplant embryonic cells into the brains of Parkinson's disease sufferers - an experimental procedure that has outraged some critics - may be less promising than once thought, researchers reported in last week's New England Journal of Medicine. In tests on 40 volunteers, researchers found that patients over age 60 who received the transplanted brain cells fared no better than people whose skulls were drilled into, but who were not given the transplanted cells. Most people who suffer from Parkinson's, a neurological disease, are over 60. Critics of using such cells, harvested from discarded human embryos, include the Vatican, which has called the research "gravely immoral.
SPORTS
November 17, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
GREEN BAY Packers great Forrest Gregg, a man celebrated for his durability on the football field, is facing a difficult challenge away from the gridiron. Nicknamed "Iron Man" for playing in a then-record 188 consecutive NFL games during his Hall of Fame career as an offensive lineman, Gregg has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of the debilitating neurological disorder is unknown, Gregg, his family and his neurologist say his disease may be related to numerous concussions he suffered during his playing career in the 1950s at SMU and from 1956-71 with the Packers and Dallas Cowboys.
SPORTS
October 28, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
TEXAS A & M basketball coach Billy Kennedy said yesterday that he is in the early stages of Parkinson's disease. Kennedy, 47, took a leave of absence from the team earlier this month to undergo testing after experiencing neck and shoulder pain for several months that led to an inability to sleep regularly. The tests revealed that Kennedy was in the early stages of Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. "I am heeding the advice of my doctors and addressing the disease and its symptoms," Kennedy said in a statement.
NEWS
June 6, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Mark Helms, the tremors of Parkinson's disease became so bad eight years ago that he was having difficulty doing the most basic things - brushing his teeth, shaving, or holding a cup of coffee. Then the 60-year-old former radio news director underwent surgery to have two electrodes implanted in his brain and attached by wires to battery-powered electric stimulators in his chest. The procedure, known as deep brain stimulation, or DBS, was performed by neurosurgeon Gordon Baltuch at Pennsylvania Hospital.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Every Tuesday, Domenic Lanciano, 60, and his daughter, Nicole, 34, go to dance class. Their goal isn't to dazzle relatives at the next family wedding or sharpen their skills for a spin on Dancing With the Stars. Domenic has Parkinson's disease, and doctors have suggested the rhythms of dance may help keep him loose and limber. He and Nicole have been going to classes for the last five months, joining 25 or so Parkinson's patients who every week shimmy and sway in Studio A at West Chester's Rock School West.
SPORTS
February 28, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Arizona coach Lute Olson labeled speculation that he has Parkinson's disease "a vicious, vicious rumor" that is "totally false. " The 72-year-old coach brought up the subject at his weekly news conference yesterday. "I have gotten some calls about rumors and certain radio stations running some things about me having Parkinson's, which is a complete lie," Olson said. "I have physicals like everyone else does. There is absolutely no medical indication of any type of problem.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, medical researchers have something nice to say about something millions of us actually like: coffee. A study in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association concludes that coffee drinkers are less likely to get Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurological ailment that affects 3 percent of people over 65. Researchers, who began studying more than 8,000 Japanese American men 35 years ago, found that those who...
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
After the transplanting of gland tissue into their brains, two men with severe Parkinson's disease showed striking improvement - one recovering enough to walk without help and get a job, according to a new report. The report marks "an important event in the history of treatment of Parkinson's disease," said an editorial accompanying the report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. However, experts said that further testing was necessary, that no one knew how long the improvements in the transplant patients would last and that such surgery posed hazards for the elderly people who are the bulk of Parkinson's patients.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Michael J. Fox - leaping into the Hudson River on a recent episode of "Spin City," bubbly as ever for his last charming visit to "The Rosie O'Donnell Show" - has Parkinson's disease. How could we not know? "It's not that I had a deep, dark secret," Fox, 37, tells the new People magazine. "It was just my thing to deal with.' The hockey-playing sitcom star said, incredibly, that he was first diagnosed with the disease seven years ago, after he noticed a recurring "twitch" in his left hand.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
Second in a series. Read part one here .  My right thumb has developed a mind of its own. Quite without warning it began to beat a rat-a-tat-tat drum solo. I watched, fascinated. Could I will it to cease? No. Could I make it speed up. To my delight, yes. It held me enthralled. It seemed to be contagious, spreading through the hand and then jumping over to the other hand, as though doing backflips. Amazing, absolutely amazing. I was so absorbed that I never thought to think it might be something dangerous.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AS THE hushed sounds of a choir singing Chinese folk songs drifted in from an adjacent space, Yao Huang sat on a hard chair, lifting and stamping his feet at a senior center in Chinatown. Julia Wood, an occupational therapist, sat facing her audience of about 12 elderly Asian Americans with Parkinson's disease. "We're going to be using seated exercises taken from Tai Chi and yoga," Wood said. An interpreter, David Lee, translated her English words into Cantonese. When prompted, Huang, 75, chanted "om" along with others in the Parkinson's support group that meets at the On Lok Senior Services Center, on 10th Street near Race.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
By Jonathan A. Segal A new North Carolina law, House Bill 2, more officially known as the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act, has created a firestorm of controversy. In sum, the law includes a requirement that individuals in North Carolina use public bathrooms that correspond with their gender of birth and not the gender with which they identify. Further, no city may enact an ordinance to the contrary. The feds have sued North Carolina, and North Carolina has sued the feds, with a focus on the impact of the law on transgender people as well as those who may share bathrooms with them.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Specialists have long suspected that symptoms progressed more slowly in Parkinson's disease patients whose main problem was tremors, rather than walking or balance. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a connection among a genetic variation, tremors, and slower progression of the disease. The information does not yet explain why some patients have a better course, but it may lead to more precise, individually targeted treatments and more accurate information for patients.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Vickie and Jack Farber, longtime supporters of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health, are giving the Center City institution $20 million to expand the Vickie and Jack Farber Institute for Neuroscience. The institute, which was founded in 2002 with a $10 million lead gift from the Farber Family Foundation, will unite Jefferson's departments of neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, and neuroscience, said Robert Rosenwasser, president of the institute. "It breaks down the silos that exist in every university and every medical center," said Rosenwasser, who also is chair of neurological surgery at Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When he was captain of the track team at La Salle College, in the decade when the international four-minute mile was broken in 1954, Edward McCabe's best time as a miler was 4 minutes, 17 seconds, his family said. Mr. McCabe was prominent enough that in 1957, he competed in a 1,000-meter race at an invitational event at Madison Square Garden. But his family seemed proudest that in 1980, when he was 46, his racing history qualified him for the Boston Marathon. "He did not have a good race," his daughter, Mary McCabe, said, but he was legitimate enough that "he had run two marathons to qualify.
FOOD
January 15, 2016 | Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
These days, if you want to impress your food-obsessed friends from New York with the culinary prowess of Philadelphia, you'd have no trouble dropping five figures on a ridiculously elaborate dinner at any one of this city's fine restaurants. But you might be surprised to hear that same boast was made by a group of well-to-do food enthusiasts from Philadelphia in 1851, and the bill from the resulting meal was in the same ballpark: between $1,000 and $1,500 (or between $29,000 and $47,000 today, depending on how inflation is calculated)
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Ed Sasinowski came home from Vietnam, he quickly left the war behind. He jumped so swiftly into civilian life - selling office supplies to some of Philadelphia's largest employers - that he didn't bother to collect a Bronze Star for courage or a Purple Heart for a shrapnel wound. He was busy. He married Deborah Smith, who said they were "soul mates," and had three children. They moved to Huntingdon Valley and then to Maple Glen. And he cofounded the firm Xtec, providing office copiers to a client base of people who had become his friends.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once a week for more than a decade, Robert L. Powell Jr. went to art classes at the Haddonfield Adult School. And until the last few weeks of this spring semester, he took classes in watercolor painting with Gwynn Walker Di Pilla. "A lot of his pictures were for his children and his grandchildren," Di Pilla said, including his final work, an incomplete still life of flowers for the youngest, 6-month-old Emily Ford. "I will finish it up for him," she said. Painting was a refuge from Parkinson's disease, she said, because "when he painted, he did not shake at all. " On Friday, June 19, Mr. Powell, 69, of Haddon Heights, who retired three years ago as a professor of business studies at what is now Rowan College at Gloucester County, died of complications of Parkinson's disease at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William T. Pfeffer, 65, of Somerdale, who owned and operated Chatham Communications, a telephone services firm in Bellmawr, from 1981 until it was sold in 2007, died of Parkinson's disease Thursday, Oct. 16, at his home. Born in Camden, Mr. Pfeffer graduated from Collingswood High School in 1967, where he won medals while on the wrestling team, daughter Jennifer Campbell said. After serving in the Navy, Mr. Pfeffer was a lineman for New Jersey Bell Telephone Co. in the 1970s, she said.
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