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Parks And Recreation

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010
10:30 p.m. CHANNEL 10 Megan Mullally guest-stars as Ron's (Nick Offerman, her real-life spouse, right) ex-wife, Tammy, who runs the library. Leslie (Amy Poehler) is distressed to find out Tammy's department is trying to take over her lot.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's aging parks and recreation facilities are going to get a lot more attention starting this spring. Thanks to a $2.6 million increase in the department's budget, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Michael DiBerardinis plans to hire 63 full-time people, most of them in skilled trades and maintenance. It's the first such expansion in as long as any one in the department - which receives less funding than parks do in most big cities - can remember. "Parks have never gotten anything close to this in recent history," DiBerardinis said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, Daily News Staff Writer
SODA TAXES, 3-1-1 call centers, budget woes and City Council political battles. No, we're not talking about life in Philly's City Hall, but in the government of fictional Pawnee, Ind., featured on the NBC sitcom "Parks and Recreation. " The show follows the travails of the ever-positive Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler), a middle manager in the parks department and a newly elected councilwoman, as she strives to improve her town. Like any great comedy, the show has colorful characters, sharp dialogue and the occasional well-timed pratfall, but what really makes "Parks and Recreation" clever - especially from the perspective of a city government and politics reporter - is how closely the story lines hew to the policy and political issues of the day and how effectively they mine comic absurdity from those topics.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
A long-range experiment is happening in West Philadelphia's Haddington Woods, a 40-acre urban forest, where experts, citizen scientists, and officials hope to find ways to restore and preserve city parklands, and find answers to dealing with invasive species, soil degradation, and even global warming. "All of the [city's] forests are degraded," said Joan Blaustein, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation's director of urban forestry. Haddington Woods, north of the 69th Street Transportation Center and east of Cobbs Creek Golf Club, was chosen as a testing ground because it has some of the most degraded - and some of the healthiest - forests in the city.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | For The Inquirer / RAMOND HOLMAN JR
Newtown Township's Department of Parks and Recreation sponsored its first karate tournament May 16. More than 65 karate enthusiasts from 6 years old to adults and from throughout the area participated.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | For The Inquirer / BILL CAIN
. The county Department of Parks and Recreation held its 14th annual Kite Day Sunday at Core Creek Park in Middletown Township. About 75 kite fanciers demonstrated the breadth of the hobby. Among them were Scott Spencer and John Smith, with a kite almost as broad as a rainbow.
NEWS
March 17, 2010 | By NANCY A. GOLDENBERG
IN JULY, on a sunny afternoon, a crowd convened at the Mander Recreation Center in Strawberry Mansion to listen as Mayor Nutter announced the members of his new Commission on Parks and Recreation. As he named his nine "guardians of the city's treasures," he urged them to swiftly pursue his ambitious vision: to creating the nation's premier parks and recreation system. And that's precisely what we've set out to do. In November 2008, after years of debate, Philadelphia voters overwhelmingly approved an amendment to the Home Rule Charter that transferred the powers and duties of the Fairmount Park Commission to a newly merged Department of Parks and Recreation and reconstituted the Fairmount Park Commission as the Commission on Parks and Recreation.
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SPORTS
May 1, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Marathon and half marathon will be run on different days, creating a race weekend in November, organizers announced Friday. In the past, the half marathon and marathon were run together. This year, the half marathon will take place on Nov. 19 and the full marathon will be run the next day. "This will give the opportunity to increase both races and give both their full justice," new race director Jim Marino said in a telephone interview. "Everybody could be part of the marathon experience without it being as crowded.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
FORMER PRESIDENT Bill Clinton popped into a Philadelphia recreation center last week, bringing world attention to a rally for his wife, Hillary, when he lashed out at protesters. The day before, Kathryn Ott Lovell, the city's new commissioner of parks and recreation, had gone to the same Dorothy Emanuel Rec Center in Cedarbrook to make sure things were ready for Clinton's visit. "You have to prep your house if company's coming," Ott Lovell said Wednesday. "It's an amazing center and a wonderful community," she added.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
ISSUE | MAYOR KENNEY'S PLAN Take stock of needs Mayor Kenney plans to issue at least $300 million in bonds to improve the condition of public parks, recreation centers, and libraries. But before we move forward on this initiative, it would be helpful to consider: City facilities are in appalling condition because the city can't afford to maintain them. Issuing $300 million in bonds is just going to dig the hole deeper. How many recreation and library facilities do we have, and how many did we have in 1970, when the city's population was 22 percent larger?
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
A long-range experiment is happening in West Philadelphia's Haddington Woods, a 40-acre urban forest, where experts, citizen scientists, and officials hope to find ways to restore and preserve city parklands, and find answers to dealing with invasive species, soil degradation, and even global warming. "All of the [city's] forests are degraded," said Joan Blaustein, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation's director of urban forestry. Haddington Woods, north of the 69th Street Transportation Center and east of Cobbs Creek Golf Club, was chosen as a testing ground because it has some of the most degraded - and some of the healthiest - forests in the city.
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Face-painting, hula-hooping, bean-bag-tossing, mini-golfing and, of course, the food trucks. Those activities, and others, drew families from all over the city and beyond Sunday to the final day of the Eakins Oval pop-up park, marking an unofficial end to summer. "I wish they would expand it in time," said Kristin Lorent, who was watching her 6-year-old daughter take hula hoop lessons on the lawn, in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "It feels like a vacation. There's a lot for the kids to do. " Lorent, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania who lives in the Fairmount area, has been bringing her daughter, Noa, down to the park all summer.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
A development group's proposal to bring an Olympic-class bicycle arena to South Philadelphia's historic Franklin D. Roosevelt Park has met with resistance from the city Commission on Parks and Recreation, which handed the group its first negative recommendation in its effort to capture four acres of land. The proposed 6,000-seat competitive cycling velodrome, called Project 250, has spurred avid support among bicycle enthusiasts and resistance from FDR Park neighborhood residents since the proposal was unveiled last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nic Esposito is at once a romantic and a realist, and both inform his passions: farming, telling stories, and advocating for fresh, local food for all. Now, with Kensington Homestead , his second book and first attempt at nonfiction, Esposito, 32, is emerging as a literary voice for the wildly vibrant farm community in Philadelphia. His 14-essay collection chronicles the joys and frustrations of growing crops in uber-urban East Kensington, where the forces of gentrification press relentlessly through the swirl of entrenched poverty.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
NOTE: This story was updated Thursday morning. Three Philadelphia recreation centers violated a long list of bookkeeping regulations, says the city controller, who has referred one former treasurer's activities to the District Attorney's Office. City Controller Alan Butkovitz released an analysis Wednesday of three of the 126 Philadelphia Recreation Advisory Councils (PRACs). The councils, which are responsible for managing the individual recreation centers' accounts, oversee nearly $2 million.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
GREAT MEN often become great curiosities / Too often become great conversation pieces / And nothing more. / But something should be said about Joseph E. Mander / Lest the Lessons he died to teach / Follow him to death. So wrote the poet Sarah E. Wright. The name of the man to whom she referred is known in Strawberry Mansion, but his story is known by only a few. Now, the namesake of Mander Park near 33rd and Diamond streets will finally become better-known. On Friday, in conjunction with a major face-lift of the park and its recreation center, a plaque will be unveiled honoring the rarely told story of Joseph E. Mander, a black man who gave his life trying to save a drowning white boy 62 years ago. "It was a very big story back in 1952, but it has gotten twisted through time," said Judith Robinson, a Strawberry Mansion resident who pushed for the plaque.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
A graphic with a story Thursday on expansion at the Philadelphia Museum of Art wrongly stated the number of items in the museum's collection, 227,000. In addition, the story misstated the material covering the exterior of the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. It is stainless steel. A caption with a photograph in some editions Thursday showing workers repairing damage at the Fairmount Water Works misnamed their employer, the Department of Parks and Recreation.
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