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Parochial Schools

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NEWS
May 6, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joanne Florig Cromie, 53, a teacher for Montgomery County parochial schools, died Saturday of cancer at her home in East Norriton Township. Mrs. Cromie, who began her teaching career at age 17, had taught at St. Mary School in Norristown, St. Philip Neri School in Lafayette Hill, and, in recent years, at Epiphany of Our Lord School in Plymouth Township, where she taught kindergarten and fifth grade. A native of Norristown, she graduated from the former Bishop Kenrick High School in Norristown in 1962 and earned her degree in education from Gwynedd Mercy College.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | Regina Medina
THE ARCHDIOCESE of Philadelphia's Office of Catholic Education on Thursday named two Catholic educators as the new superintendents of schools, effective immediately.   Carol A. Cary, 57, will be the superintendent in charge of parochial high schools. Jacqueline P. Coccia, 47, will oversee the Archdiocese's elementary schools. Cary has a bachelor's degree from West Chester University and a teaching certificate from Meredith College in Raleigh, N.C. The Exton resident has a master's degree in educational administration from North Carolina State and a doctorate from Immaculata University.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a result of a Feb. 5 decision by a federal judge, 325 teachers and aides in the Philadelphia school district whose salaries are paid with federal funds were sent back to Catholic schools this week. But educators said the ruling was a mixed blessing: While parish principals were rejoicing over the return of their longtime staff, their public school counterparts who had been relying on the services of the teachers and aides were upset by their departure. "We are elated to have them back," said Sister Helen Ann Sharkey, principal of St. Malachy School in North Philadelphia, which welcomed back three part-time aides and a reading specialist on Monday.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
As the financially struggling Archdiocese of Philadelphia looks to a private foundation to manage its high schools, it should take a close look at the city public schools' venture into similar waters to avoid the same mistakes. Beginning Sept. 1, the Faith in the Future Foundation will take over management of 17 Catholic high schools and four special-education schools. It will become the first independently run Catholic system in the country. Grade schools will still be managed by the parishes.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
By yesterday morning, there wasn't much left inside St. Michael's Elementary School in Gibbstown, except some clunky steel desks and the paper tulips on the windows in the first grade. It was a forlorn sight to Becky Blazek. Blazek has had the misfortune of presiding over St. Michael's Parent- Teachers Association during its worst year. She was still shaken yesterday as the school's last day of classes wound to a close. "How can I say it?" she said, choking back tears.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE DREADED polar vortex hit Philadelphia again yesterday morning - earlier than expected - and resulted in school closures today, massive flight cancellations and a snow emergency that's in effect until noon. All Philadelphia district and Archdiocesan schools are closed today. Early-childhood and after-school programs run by the district also will be shuttered. For more information on school closures, call the district's information hotline at 215-400-INFO (4636) or log on to philasd.org.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
JUST 10 years ago, Mark Gleason was a journalist and publisher working in New York, trying to launch a magazine called Book that was heavily funded by Barnes & Noble. His first foray into education came a couple of years later, when as a sometimes-frustrated parent he ran for and won a seat on his suburban school board in North Jersey. Now the 48-year-old Gleason - unknown in Philadelphia at the start of the decade - finds himself at the center of the maelstrom that is school reform in America's fifth-largest city.
NEWS
January 14, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four times a year, the choice to send her two children to Catholic school makes Winnie Branton wince. But for the 361 other days, the Haddonfield mother has no regrets about her decision to bypass the Camden County borough's highly regarded public-education system for close-knit Christ the King, her parish's school for kindergarten through eighth grade. "The days I have to pay my quarterly taxes, it kills me. But I like the town and I love the school, so it's worth it," Branton said.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New Jersey's parochial-school football playoffs could be drastically altered if a proposal currently before the NJSIAA Executive Committee is approved. The proposal, which would affect only football, would do the following: Eliminate the current classifications of Parochial A and Parochial B, and replace them with four groups: Parochial 1, Parochial 2, Parochial 3 and Parochial 4. Eliminate the current Parochial North and Parochial South geographical sections and regroup the state's 42 football-playing parochial schools on a statewide basis.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A year ago, Christa Hill was facing a problem. She wanted her daughter Caitlyn, then 3, to eventually attend a parochial school, but the Gibbstown woman had no parish preschool nearby. "I wanted to send her to a school where she would get the background for the Catholic school she'd be going to later," Hill said. Today, Hill is readying Caitlyn for her first day in the 4-year-old prekindergarten class at Guardian Angels Regional School, which will open Sept. 5 to students in Gibbstown, Paulsboro and Mullica Hill.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE DREADED polar vortex hit Philadelphia again yesterday morning - earlier than expected - and resulted in school closures today, massive flight cancellations and a snow emergency that's in effect until noon. All Philadelphia district and Archdiocesan schools are closed today. Early-childhood and after-school programs run by the district also will be shuttered. For more information on school closures, call the district's information hotline at 215-400-INFO (4636) or log on to philasd.org.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WITH A CHILD in seventh grade, Philadelphia resident Sarah Forrest has already begun navigating the high-school application process. Although it's fairly simple for district-run schools, she said, the process can be anything but for charters. She said information on the charter application process is available, but the schools have different timelines, "and it's kind of all over the map," said Forrest, who also has a third-grader in the district. Forrest is hardly alone. She was among a few hundred community members who debated a proposal for a single application and common enrollment for district-run, charter and parochial high schools last night at a School Reform Commission meeting.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
JUST 10 years ago, Mark Gleason was a journalist and publisher working in New York, trying to launch a magazine called Book that was heavily funded by Barnes & Noble. His first foray into education came a couple of years later, when as a sometimes-frustrated parent he ran for and won a seat on his suburban school board in North Jersey. Now the 48-year-old Gleason - unknown in Philadelphia at the start of the decade - finds himself at the center of the maelstrom that is school reform in America's fifth-largest city.
NEWS
August 28, 2013
FOR EVERY article written about ex-offenders, I notice that there is never any mention of the fact that these people are where they are in their lives because of the choices they made. Why should they be rewarded with special treatment while the law-abiding person is overlooked for making the right choices in his or her life? I can understand second chances but at whose expense? With all the unemployed people in Philadelphia, why are companies only being offered incentives for hiring ex-cons?
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
A READER CALLED to complain about the coverage the Daily News gave to Philadelphia School District Superintendent William Hite's announcement that our dead-broke schools might not open on Sept. 9. "I'm sick of reading about the schools," he bitched. (Yes, I just used the word "bitched. " I am that angry.) He no longer has school-age kids, he said. Besides, he sent his children to parochial schools, so the state of public education has never meant anything to him. "Not everyone in Philly uses public school," he said.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fight between two teenage girls Tuesday afternoon in Center City drew a large crowd of young people in the area of 15th and Chestnut Streets, said parents of some of the teens arrested at the scene. It was not a planned "flash mob," and the crowd had not gathered for any particular purpose, the parents said Wednesday. "My son wasn't out there fighting," Dwayne Louis, 39, said outside the Youth Study Center, where 10 juveniles were awaiting hearings Wednesday. Whatever happened, police arrested 14 people - including Louis' son - amid rumors of a flash mob. The Wendy's restaurant at 15th and Chestnut locked its doors during the mayhem.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
WHILE the number of district-run and parochial schools shrinks and the city's charter-school population booms, a group of education advocates is looking at a plan to implement a single, citywide enrollment process. The result could alter Philadelphia's educational landscape. The plan, still in the early stages, would involve students' filling out one application that would place them on lists at district, charter and parochial schools in the city, said Miles Wilson, director of the Great Schools Compact for the Philadelphia Schools Partnership.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting the real estate market in this region's communities.   It had been March for only about 12 hours, but already the front windows of houses on every street in Fox Chase were sporting shamrocks in anticipation of St. Patrick's Day. The day also was on the mind of Gina O'Rourke, who with husband Sean owns In the Loop Cafe at Barnes and Loney Streets. She was in the market for Irish musicians to perform March 16 at the cafe's St. Patrick's "acoustic breakfast.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
As sad as it was to see adults and children crying over the final decision to close 23 Philadelphia schools, it was more disheartening to see politicians act as if they were innocent bystanders in the matter. Particularly irritating were City Council members who acted sympathetic but hadn't tried to get the schools more money by adjusting the property-tax rate during the reassessment process. Council patted itself on the back for giving the schools extra funds last year, but the commitment was modest.
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