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NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
The deluge of pet-linked parodies of national periodicals continues with publication of CQ by Ina Schell (Main Street Press, paper $8.95). This is a takeoff on Gentlemen's Quarterly and follows Dogue, which parodied Vogue, and Catmopolitan, a somewhat less successful sendup of Cosmopolitan. CQ is slick, has excellent photos, is printed on luxuriously heavy stock and, unfortunately, clings tenaciously to the formula that made its predecessors successful. The articles are signed with such cutesy names as Gay Taleash, Rona Bassett, Lhasa L'Amour, Jane Pawley and Bernard Malamute.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Comedians, musicians and satirists who use copyrighted works to poke fun at their targets won a major victory yesterday in the Supreme Court. The justices, ruling unanimously in a dispute over the rap group 2 Live Crew's crude version of the rock classic "Oh, Pretty Woman," declared for the first time that unauthorized commercial parodies may be protected from penalties for copyright infringement. "This is a very important victory for Saturday Night Live, the Capitol Steps, Mark Russell, Mad magazine, the Harvard Lampoon and many others who make their living through the commercial use of parody," said Alan Mark Turk, a Nashville lawyer who represented 2 Live Crew before the Supreme Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Naked Gun and Without a Clue, the two spiritless spoofs in current release, offer a pair of dimwitted detectives and further proof - if any were needed - that we do indeed live in the age of Parodies Lost. To measure how far off course the art of parody has strayed, you need only contrast a scene from The Naked Gun, which opened Friday, with a similar moment in Mel Brooks' brilliant sendup of Alfred Hitchcock in High Anxiety. It's a fair comparison because High Anxiety (1977)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
A cop comedy with a severe case of arrested development, The Naked Gun is a cheerfully vulgar spoof that does for Police Squad! what Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks did for (and to) Dragnet last summer. It turns out that there is parity in police parody, so perhaps we can greet the new entry with a paraphrase of Dragnet's fanfare: Dumb-de-dumb-dumb. When The Naked Gun is parboiling the cliches of the hard-boiled detective and sticking to the conventions of the gumshoe idiom, it's silly and sometimes amusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the woolly-bully world of John Waters' Cry-Baby, the "bad" kids are good, the "good" kids are bad and their parents are real-life has-beens who were once teenage celebrities. The film is a must for those pining to know what Patty Hearst, David Nelson and Troy Donahue look like as grownups. This inert musical by the director of the lively Hairspray and the 100 percent unnatural Polyester has its moments, but precious few of them. As Cry-Baby, a leatherclad Baltimore biker/bad-boy circa 1954, Johnny Depp has the sweet surliness of a lobotomized young Elvis and wears a spit curl like a tilted halo.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1993 | By Dennis Romero, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Was it live? Or was it a P.C. fest? Both, really, and I feel fine. Tennessee's Judybats brought their mixture of R.E.M. obliquity and out-and-out parody to the Chestnut Cabaret on Wednesday night and transcended the tight, tuneful sounds of its recorded work. "Say it loud, 'I'm P.C. and I'm proud,' " was the manifesto of the night, and the Judybats proved it. Before "Margot Known as Missy," lead singer Jeff Heiskell warned: "We're going to do a song about lesbians. So if you have a problem with lesbians, hit the . . . door.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Dr. Frankenstein's train pulls alongside the platform and he hails an urchin with, "Pardon me, boy, is this the Transylvania Station?" It sure is, and Young Frankenstein, the finest and most disciplined of Mel Brooks' parodies, is up and running. The action and the jokes are as antic and anarchic as ever, but Brooks has made a meticulous homage to the style and look of the great thirties horror films, as well as a droll and affectionate sendup. He once described his approach by saying, "My movies rise below vulgarity.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
OK, there was this rock band. Couldn't play much of anything well enough to get a foot into the industry. The members tried three times. All failures. But this trio really wanted to make it in the music industry. So what did they do? A few months ago, Nuclear Fish - three Northeast men in their 20s - started a comedy band that poked fun at rock groups. And it's working. On Nov. 17, Nuclear Fish took third place in Tropicana Hotel & Casino's Fourth Annual "Comedy Showdown" in Atlantic City.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
After watching a couple of installments of VH1's Behind the Music - or an episode or two of MTV's The Osbournes - the seminal 1984 mockumentary This Is Spinal Tap doesn't seem anywhere near as far-fetched as it once did. (Actually, it didn't seem too far off the mark to begin with - that's why it's so scarily funny.) Pretending to be the portrait of a British metal band in its waning, paunchy days, the Rob Reiner-directed parody captures the noisy, narcissistic world of rock-and-roll - the backstage bickering, the pretentious on-camera pontificating - in all its shabby, self-serious excess.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Media lawyer Norman L. Goldberg, who in the last two years has sued and been sued over his law practice, is suing again. This time his target is the Delaware County Bar Association for publishing a parody that called him names. In a suit filed this month in Delaware County Court, Goldberg is seeking more than $50,000 in punitive damages for the item in the May 1994 issue of the association's De Minimis newsletter. The item is portrayed as a classified ad placed by the "Board of Judges, Court House, Media, PA," looking to complete a set of playing cards poking fun at Norman Goldberg.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
So you say you haven't had enough politics. Well, have I got the show for you! Take a break from the bloggers and the pundits, the TV and the newspapers, and go to the theater! Hillary and Clinton , Philadelphia Theatre Company's last production of their season, couldn't be better timed - or worse, depending on your appetite for politics. In Lucas Hnath's mildly amusing, mildly insightful play is a parody of two particularly famous figures, living in pre-election 2008 in some parallel universe where these Clintons are not exactly our Clintons, but close enough to be caricatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
It's a match made in nothing related to heaven: Larry Flynt vs. some guy named Donald. In a presidential election year in which candidates allude to their penis size, it seems only fitting that the Hustler founder and chairman is releasing a new parody adult video, The Donald , which he calls "a fantasized look at how the Republican Party front-runner might select his Vice Presidential running mate. " "The downward spiral of name-calling in the GOP Presidential primary campaign is a national embarrassment and an insult to the intelligence of the American people," declared Flynt, "but it's also the perfect catalyst for the debauchery that Hustler Video has concocted in The Donald . This parody is my contribution to the most entertaining Republican Party contest in recent history.
NEWS
May 22, 2015
IT'S NOT that the "Forbidden Broadway" series has spent more than 30 years butchering musical theater's sacred cows. It's more like the venerable revue has tipped said revered bovines. "Forbidden Broadway" is a theater-world fixture, thanks to its playful skewering of musicals, both iconic and long-forgotten, using the music from various scores but with original lyrics written by Gerard Alessandrini , who created the concept in the early 1980s. While the songs poke gentle fun at their subjects - often the stars who sang the originals - there is little that is mean-spirited in the musical satires.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Fans of Mel Brooks and John Waters will love We Will Rock You , now in a touring production at the Academy of Music. Fans of Queen's music, not so much. As someone who likes both Brooks' comedies and Queen's music, I can tell you the two styles don't mix well, at least not in Ben Elton's book. The storyline draws on Star Wars , 1984 , A Clockwork Orange , and The Matrix . "Sometime in the future," tormented teenager Galileo (Brian Justin Crum) lives in a totalitarian state called the iPlanet, where everyone plugs into Globalsoft - a virtual world of video games, advertisements, and pop music.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Henry C. Jackson, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A conservative watchdog group released a half dozen movie parody videos and comedy skits Tuesday by the General Services Administration that were removed from the agency's website after an inspector general report last year revealed lavish agency spending on a Las Vegas conference. Judicial Watch, which obtained the material through a Freedom of Information Act request, said it was tipped to the videos by a current GSA employee, Linda Shenwick. Shenwick, a self-described whistle-blower, said the videos were a waste of time and money.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By William Loeffler, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
It's not easy being a national disgrace for 60 years. If you stacked all the issues of Mad magazine that grade-school teachers and high-school principals have confiscated since its 1952 debut, you might have enough paper to house-train 20 million puppies. To add insult to injury, the editors of Mad have issued Totally Mad: 60 Years of Humor, Satire, Stupidity, and Stupidity (Time Home Entertainment, $34.95, Cheap!). Readers can relive some of their Maddest moments: comic-strip movie parodies like "The Oddfather," mock ads, political satire, the Mad "Fold-In," "Spy vs. Spy," "The Lighter Side" and the cartoons of Don Martin, with their dementedly inventive sound effects like "Pshchlaff!"
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Tony Norman
"I'm not really the heroic type. I was beat up by Quakers. " - Woody Allen as Miles Monroe in "Sleeper" Quakers aren't part of the American Anabaptist tradition. Other than a shared predisposition toward nonviolence, they have nothing in common with the Amish. Still, Allen's quip helps us think realistically about groups with reputations for fierce peacefulness. Recently, seven members of a breakaway sect were arrested in Ohio for chopping off the beards of their fellow Amish for refusing to tolerate their bad behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2011 | By Gregory Thomas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bedtime is a battleground. Just try to find a parental chore that's harder than getting an unwilling toddler down for the night. "Sleep is a hot button," says Adam Mansbach, who gives that button a push with his new book Go the F- to Sleep (Akashic Books, $14.95). The profanely titled parody is a far cry from the typical "tuck 'em in" stuff of bedtime books, but scores with moms and dads as a "children's book for parents. " It zoomed right to the top of Amazon.com's best-seller list in April, thanks to Internet buzz, even though it doesn't officially debut until Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | Billboard.com
Even though it took some doing, "Weird Al" Yankovic has no hard feelings toward Lady Gaga over the struggle to release "Perform This Way," his parody of her hit "Born This Way" and the first single from his forthcoming new album "Alpocalypse. " Gaga's manager had initially refused permission for Yankovic to release "Perform This Way," but Yankovic says things changed once Gaga herself heard the song. "Even though her manager was presenting it as such, she had never once approached Gaga, so it was news to her when people were . . . asking, 'How come you're not letting Weird Al do his parody?
NEWS
May 22, 2011
Bill Rechin, 80, a cartoonist known for the syndicated Crock strip that parodies life in a Foreign Legion desert outpost, died at home Saturday in Spotsylvania County, Va., of complications from esophageal cancer. In 1975, Mr. Rechin, Don Wilder, and Brant Parker created the strip as a parody of the Foreign Legion classic Beau Geste . The strip, which follows the adventures of Vermin P. Crock and an assortment of characters at a grim desert outpost, appears in more than 200 newspapers.
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