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Parole Board

NEWS
December 2, 2012 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
ASTATE parole officer and two of his bosses were fired Friday for their botched supervision of Rafael Jones, a career criminal who allegedly murdered a veteran Philly cop. Authorities have said that Jones, 23, and an accomplice, Chancier McFarland, 19, stalked and gunned down Officer Moses Walker Jr. in North Philly on Aug. 18 during a botched robbery attempt. The question of why Jones - who failed a drug test about a week before Walker's slaying - was still on the street soon took center stage.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou, Kitty Caparella and John Baer, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Gloria Campisi and Kurt Heine contributed to this report
The Blame Game has begun. Gov. Ridge blasted his parole board yesterday and blamed them for letting a convicted murderer go free, only to kill again. He's so mad that he might ask the board's chairman to resign, said his press secretary. The chairman, Allen Castor, is believed to have approved the parole of Robert "Mudman" Simon, 43,a Warlocks motorcycle gang member accused in the shooting death Saturday of a South Jersey police sergeant. New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman - less than thrilled with Simon's release on Feb. 18 - pointed her finger straight at Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Mike Vereb introduced legislation Wednesday that would give crime victims and their families the right to speak directly to the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole before parole decisions were made. Technically, the proposal is known as House Bill 492. But Vereb (R., Montgomery) said at a news conference in Norristown packed with state and local officials that he was naming it the "Ellen Gregory Robb Legislation. " "Out of the tragic, horrific death of Ellen Gregory Robb, we are seeing something very positive happen," said Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman, who was among those who worked on the legislation with Vereb and the victim's family.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelanand Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The brother of a woman bludgeoned to death by her husband, former University of Pennsylvania professor Rafael Robb, learned Friday he will get an audience with the state parole chairman in an eleventh-hour bid to keep Robb from being released in prison. Gary Gregory, brother of Ellen Robb, slain in December 2006 in her Upper Merion home, got the call before a news conference at which state legislators and Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman accused the parole board of violating state law by previously denying the family the right to testify before it. State Board of Probation and Parole spokesman Leo Dunn said it is not typical but not unheard of a board chairman to meet with a victim's family.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | Breaking News Staff
This story corrects a previous version. The Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole and its chairman have asked a federal court to dismiss a civil suit filed by the family of Philadelphia Police Officer Moses Walker Jr., who was slain in the summer by a criminal out on "special probation. " Walker's family filed the suit in November, seeking damages against the board and chairman Michael Potteiger. Walker, 40, was slain during an attempted stickup Aug. 18 as he walked to a bus stop after an overnight shift in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The state's parole board would have far more power to deny early release to criminals under several bills that a key Senate committee passed yesterday, two years after the Robert "Mudman" Simon murder case sparked criticism of the system. But the changes, which include a provision requiring a violent offender to serve at least 85 percent of a sentence, could further burden an already crowded state prison system and drive up costs, an issue the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee sidestepped during its debate yesterday.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, Daily News Staff Writer (Daily News staff writer Michael Days contributed to this story.)
Alfonso Robbins Africa, a jailed MOVE member considered a potential leader of the cult, wants to return to his home - the main MOVE house in Southwest Philadelphia - when he becomes eligible for parole on July 29, the Daily News has learned. "This opens up a whole Pandora's box," said a police official. "We could object to that on the basis of a potential for violence and a concern for the community. " Africa, convicted last year of assaulting a police officer with a tire iron, has drafted a parole plan that includes residing at 1630 S. 56th St., which he owns with his wife, Mary Robbins Africa, according to Joseph Long, spokesman for the state Department of Probation and Parole.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Prisoners up for parole in New Jersey will face greater hurdles to their release because of changes approved by the legislature yesterday, which give the state parole board more power to deny parole. The changes come two years after Pennsylvania parolee Robert "Mudman" Simon murdered a Franklin Township policeman and sparked considerable criticism of New Jersey's own parole system. Currently, the state parole board is drastically restricted in the facts about a prisoner's behavior it can review when determining whether to grant the inmate early release.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Efrain Feliciano, Gov. McGreevey's former deputy campaign manager, is now something of a mystery man. Since October, Feliciano has officially been an "interagency liaison" for the Delaware River Port Authority, responsible for assisting the bistate authority's directors with government relations, communication and research. But Feliciano, 49, is the only authority employee who is not on its payroll. He gets his $81,993 annual salary from the State of New Jersey, which since 1979 has employed him as an officer of the Parole Board.
NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Since convicted murderer Thomas Trantino was released Feb. 11 from a Camden halfway house, he has lost his job, a chance to live in New York, and his residence in a Collingswood group home. Trantino, who spent 38 years behind bars for the slaying of two police officers in Bergen County, is back in Camden, in a homeless shelter. His attorney, Roger Lowenstein, contended that the state parole board was acting on a "secret agreement" with the victims' families to deny Trantino a job and housing.
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